Effective: Late Spring 8-Week, 2017/2018

SACS 102: South Asian Culture And Society II

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  Course Description

An exploration of the societies and cultures of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka,, Maldives, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Bhutan. This course will allow the students with a theoretical knowledge of South Asia to examine the diverse realities of South Asian societies and cultures. Students will gain a more in-depth understanding of South Asian social norms, social hierarchy, religious practice, political conflict, immigration patterns and folklore. This course meets the multicultural graduation requirement. 

Prerequisite: It is strongly recommended that students take SACS 101 before taking this class.

Proctored Exams: None



  Textbooks

Required

  • Mines, Diane and Sarah Lamb, eds. Everyday Life in South Asia. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2010.
    • ISBN-978-0253221940
  • Narayan, Kirin. Mondays on the Dark Night of the Moon: Himalayan Foothill Folktales. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997.
    • ISBN-978-0195103496
  • Dyson, Jane, Lubow, Arthur and Schmidle, Nicholas. Online Readings.

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.

  Course Overview

This course will allow the student to go beyond a theoretical knowledge of South Asia and delve into the lived realities of South Asia societies. Case studies of different South Asian cultural locations will take students from generality to specificity as we explore multiple cultural locations. Students will gain a better understanding of the diversity of South Asian social norms and their impact on gender roles, identity, and social hierarchy. The course material will expose the manner in which caste and class shape the lives of real individuals in South Asia. Utilizing ethnographic and journalistic narratives, the course will also explore the diverse practices of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam in several South Asian societies. Issues of political conflict, violence, and globalization will be examined through case studies of South Asian nations and the South Asian Diaspora. Finally, students will learn about the many functions of South Asian folklore through reading folk stories from the Kangra region of Northern India. I hope that the insights gained in this class will encourage students to pursue further academic and/or personal studies of South Asian culture and society.

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Objectives

  • To gain a more in-depth knowledge of the lived realities of life in South Asia
  • To explore how elements of culture shape South Asian social norms, worldview, and behavior

  Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Engage in discussions of South Asian social norms and traditions
  • Apply knowledge and understanding regarding the ways that social and cultural norms shape human societies throughout the world
  • Analyze caste, class, and social inequality in South Asia and beyond
  • Participate in an intense study of the lived realities of South Asian religions and cultural traditions
  • Develop an informed and ethical perspective on the current conflicts in South Asia
  • Utilize readings of folklore to better understand how norms and values are communicated through different kinds of literature
  • Write an analytical, well-reasoned, structured paper that explores an issue of South Asian culture and society

  Grading

Grading Scale

Grade Points Percent
A 270-300 90-100%
B 240-269 80-89%
C 210-239 70-79%
D 180-209 60-69%
F 0-179 0-59%

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (12) 100 33%
Midterm Paper (1) 40 13%
Quizzes (2) 20 7%
Final Paper (1) 100 33%
Participation (8) 40 13%
Total 300 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Introduction 5 Wednesday/Sunday
Document Analysis #1 5 Friday
Roundtable Discussion #1 5
Online Investigation #1 5 Sunday
Midterm Paper topic due 0

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Document Analysis #2 5 Wednesday
Roundtable Discussion #2 5 Friday
Participation or Response 5 Sunday

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Document Analysis #3 5 Wednesday
Roundtable Discussion #3 5 Friday
Online Investigation #2 5 Sunday
Participation or Response 5
Quiz #1 10
Dropbox 1 5

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Document Analysis #4 5 Wednesday
Roundtable Discussion #4 5 Friday
Online Investigation #3 5 Sunday
Participation or Response 5
Midterm Research Paper 35

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Document Analysis #5 5 Wednesday
Roundtable Discussion #5 5 Friday
Participation or Response 5 Sunday

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Document Analysis #6 5 Wednesday
Roundtable Discussion #6 5 Friday
Participation or Response 5 Sunday
Dropbox 2: Sources/Updated topic (if applicable) 5

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Document Analysis #7 5 Wednesday
Roundtable Discussion #7 5 Friday
Online Investigation #4 5 Sunday
Participation or Response 5
Quiz #2 10

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Document Analysis #8 5 Wednesday
Roundtable Discussion #8 5 Thursday
Participation or Response 5
Final Research Paper 95 Saturday
Total Points: 300

  Assignment Overview

Text readings

Text readings should be completed prior to submitting assignments or weekly discussion postings.  All graded assignments will rely on information derived from the text.  All other sources must be identified.

Discussions

Discussion postings should be completed and turned in by Wednesday and Friday of each assigned week. Document Analysis postings are due each week on Wednesday and Roundtable postings and Online Investigation postings (assigned in Weeks 1, 3, 4 and 6) are due each week on Friday.  Full instructions and a rubric for each prompt are in the week’s overview, found in the course Content area.  Discussion postings should represent a thoughtful analysis of the weekly readings. There will be two discussion postings per week, plus four online investigation postings. This adds up to a total of 20 postings for the course. Each posting is worth 5 points. Discussion postings are informal and are an opportunity for you to express your thoughts and opinions, to engage in respectful debate, and to solicit feedback from the instructor and other students in the class.  You will be unable to participate in the Document Analysis, Roundtable Discussion, or Online Investigation threads until you first post your own response.  In addition to fulfilling the requirements of weekly discussion assignments, participation points are earned by meaningful responses to other student’s postings, clarifying their question or posting a meaningful question or point in need of clarification. Please note that “What a great post!” or “I totally agree with you.”  are not substantive enough posts to receive credit.  I will not take off points for misspelling or grammatical errors. However, your responses should be readable and utilize appropriate punctuation. i insist that u do not rite like this!

Here are some possible approaches to answering a discussion prompt:

Compare what you read with other information you have from other classes or personal knowledge/experience.

Critique the text. I also call this 'talking back to the text.' Think about why an author chose to say the things he/or she said, or why they chose to approach an issue in a certain way.

Make connections to other things you know and have learned.

Expand upon what you read. Theorize about how the material relates to other scholarly or practical information.

Ask questions.

Participation Points

Forty points can be gained by active and frequent online class participation in excess of assigned posting discussions. Each week you will have the opportunity to earn five participation points. Points are earned by posting at least two meaningful, substantive, and academic responses to other students’ postings, clarifying one of their questions, or posting a meaningful question or point in need of clarification. Substantive responses are more than a sentence or two long. .

Quizzes

There will be two quizzes during the course.  The first quiz will take place during Week 3 and the second quiz will take place during Week 7. These quizzes will be used to check your comprehension of the material up to that point and consist of several short essay questions that will be worth 2 points each. Look for a study guide in the week’s announcements. Quizzes will be due no later than Sunday of the week in which they are assigned.

Midterm and Final Paper Assignments

There are two options for completing the midterm and final paper assignments.
  1. Select one topic and complete the midterm paper assignment as described below. Then using your completed midterm paper and same topic provided additional information and sources to adhere to the final exam paper guidelines.
  2. Select a topic and complete the midterm paper assignments as described. Select a different topic and complete the final paper assignment as described. This second option means you must select two topics and write two complete papers.
Midterm Paper Assignment:  The midterm paper assignment is divided into three manageable sections; topic selection, dropbox 1, and the final submission. Resources to help guide your research and writing are available in the Content and Links areas of the course.  You should be sure to read the document that fully explains the assignment. 
  • Topic due: Post your selected topic to the appropriate discussion board by Sunday of Week 1. I must approve all selected topics. Approval will be posted as a reply in the discussions area.
  • Dropbox 1: Thesis and Introduction draft: Submit a document with a draft of your introductory paragraph for your midterm paper to the dropbox by Sunday of Week 3.Your draft must include a clear thesis statement (answer to your research question) and should consider the midterm Paper guidelines and requirements.
  • Midterm Paper: The midterm paper is due to the dropbox by Sunday of Week 4. The midterm paper must be a 4-5 page formal exploration of a topic in South Asian culture and society. The paper must be based on scholarly research and should include headings, assignment number and title, and be double-spaced with 12 point font, 1 inch margins.The title page and bibliography/works cited do not count towards the page minimum of written content. The midterm paper is worth 35 points, assigned on the basis of percent of completeness, strength of main argument, structure, thoughtfulness, and readability. 
Final Paper Assignment:  The final paper assignment is divided into sections as well; dropbox 2 and the final submission. Resources to help guide your research and writing are available in the Content and Links areas of the course.  You should be sure to read the document that fully explains the assignment.
  • Dropbox 2: Sources/Updated topic (if applicable):
    • If you are selecting Option 1 from above, submit a document with at least 3 additional sources, sources not previously used in the midterm paper that will support your final paper. Sources must be from the Stafford Library and should be ebooks or articles. Provide a citation in proper APA or MLA style and at least two sentences describing how each source will help you edit and develop your paper.
    • If you are selecting Option 2 from above, submit a document with a new suggested topic, at least 3 sources that will support your final paper and pose the question you anticipate answering with your thesis statement. Sources must be from the Stafford Library and should be ebooks or articles. Provide a citation in proper APA or MLA style and at least two sentences describing how each source will help you develop your paper.
  • Final Paper: The final paper is due to the dropbox by Saturday of Week 8. The final paper must be an 8-10 page research paper on a topic of your choosing. The midterm paper can be developed into the final paper with permission. Papers should have headings, a title, double-spaced, 12 point font, 1 inch margins, citations, and bibliography. The title page and bibliography/works cited do not count towards the 8-10 page minimum of written content. The paper should be a scholarly investigation of a topic in the area of South Asian culture/society. You should utilize and cite at least six sources, three of which must be outside of assigned course readings.I will post a list of suggested topics and texts in the Course Content area as well as a series of documents designed to aid you in the writing process.The assignment is meant to be an enjoyable opportunity to be creative and explore a topic that interests you.The final paper is worth 95 points and will be graded according to the point system presented in the assignment table below and the rubric provided in the Content area. 

  Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Reading Assignments (90 pgs)
Note: For each week readings are shown in suggested order.
Everyday Life in South Asia
•    “Out Here in Kathmandu”: Youth and the Contradictions of Modernity in Urban Nepal – pg. 40
•    Breadwinners No More: Identities in Flux – pg. 110
•    Crossing “Lines” of Difference: Transnational Movements and Sexual Subjectivities in Hyderabad, India – pg. 132
•    Life on the Margins: A Hijra’s Story – pg. 124
•    Allah Gives Both Boys and Girls – pg. 26
•    Weakness, Worry Illness, and Poverty in the Slums of Dhaka – pg. 180
•    New Light in the House: Schooling Girls in Rural North India – pg. 80
•    Offstage with Special Drama Actresses in Tamil Nadu, South India: Roadwork – pg. 94
Introduction
Tell the class something about yourself and any special interests you have in the study of South Asia. (Due Wednesday by 11:50 PM CT)
Document Analysis #1
What does the term “norm” mean when it is used in the social sciences? What are some of the South Asian norms of masculinity and love described in “Out here in Kathmandu,” “Breadwinners No More,” “Crossing  ‘Lines’ of Difference,” and “Life on the Margins”? How do the individuals in these chapters both conform to and violate these norms? Give examples from at least two of these readings. (Due Wednesday by 11:59 PM CT)
Roundtable Discussion #1
How do women in “Allah Gives Both Boys and Girls,” “Weakness, Worry Illness, and Poverty in the Slums of Dhaka,” “New Light in the House,“ and “Roadwork” demonstrate both passivity and action in the face of the inequalities that confront them? In your opinion, overall do the women in these chapters appear to be more passive or more active in confronting oppression?  Give examples from at least two of these readings. (Due Friday by 11:59 PM CT)
Online Investigation #1

Go to the Content area of the course and click on the link “Online Investigation #1: South Asian Countries and Geography.” Follow the instructions there to explore South Asian geography.   Familiarize yourself with the countries and their locations for Quiz #1.

For the Online Investigation #1 posting answer the following questions: How do you think the geography and political boundaries of nation states have shaped the cultures and societies of modern South Asia? If the political boundaries had been drawn differently, how might those cultures and societies be different?(Due Sunday by 11:59 PM CT)

Midterm Paper topic due
Post your selected topic to the appropriate discussion board. All topics must receive approval from me. Post your desired topic by Sunday.
Reading Assignments (69 pgs)
Everyday Life in South Asia
•    Introduction to Part III: Caste, Class and Community – pg.145
•    God Chariots in the Garden of Castes: Hierarchy and Festival in a Hindu City – pg. 155
•    High and Low Castes in Karani – pg. 171
•    Anjali’s Alliance: Class Mobility in Urban India—pg. 192
•    Introduction to Part IV: Practicing Religion – pg. 219
•    The Hindu Gods in a South India Village – pg. 226
•    The Feast of Love – pg. 238
Document Analysis #2

What are some of the restrictions on exchange and interaction between individuals of different castes? Give examples from at least two readings. What is the rationale behind these restrictions? (Due Wednesday by 11:59 PM CT)

OR

Is caste status fixed or can an individual move into a higher caste within his/her lifetime? How are caste and class different (or are they)?  Can individuals or families move upward in terms of class? Give examples from at least two readings. (Due Wednesday by 11:59 PM CT)

Roundtable Discussion #2
What traditional Indian village norms are broken during the celebration of Holi? Can you think of any holidays, festivals, or parties celebrated in the U.S. that have any similarities to Holi?  What social purposes do you think this type of celebration fulfills?  Be sure to specifically reference the article you read about Holi. (Due Friday by 11:59 PM CT)
Participation or Response
Points can be gained by active and frequent online class participation in excess of assigned posting discussions. Each week you will have the opportunity to earn five participation points. Points are earned by posting at least two meaningful, substantive, and academic responses to other students’ postings, clarifying one of their questions, or posting a meaningful question or point in need of clarification. Substantive responses are more than a sentence or two long.
Reading Assignments (54 pgs)
Everyday Life in South Asia
• The Delusion of Gender and Renunciation in Buddhist Kashmir – pg. 250
Online Reading (links found in Content area of the course or above with full citations)
• The Changing Face of Buddhism in Bhutan in Smithsonian Magazine
Everyday Life in South Asia
• Muslim Village Intellectuals: The Life of the Mind in Northern Pakistan – pg. 263
• In Friendship: A Father, a Daughter, a Jinn – pg. 275
• Vernacular Islam at a Healing Crossroads in Hyderabad – pg. 290
Online Reading (link found in Content area of the course)
• Pakistan’s Sufis Practice Faith and Ecstasy in Smithsonian Magazine

Document Analysis #3
In SACS 101 we focused mainly on general theoretical readings about religion. How do these readings expand your understanding of Buddhism and Islam? What did you find surprising in the way religion is practiced “on the ground” as opposed to reading about its theoretical practice? (Due Wednesday by 11:59 PM CT)
Roundtable Discussion #3
What sort of stereotypes might be associated with “Muslim villagers”?  How does the article “Muslim Village Intellectuals” counter stereotypes about Muslim villagers? Discuss the diversity of opinions on standards of acceptable behavior and how to live a Muslim life in Chitral. (Due Friday by 11:59 PM CT)
Online Investigation #2
Go to the Content area of the course and click on the “Islamic Art” link. That will take you to The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Islamic Art of the Deccan exhibit.  Scroll through the photographs of the collection.  Respond to the following prompts: What are some themes that you notice in the art? Pick a particular piece, provide a link to it, and describe several aspects of it that you find interesting. What do you think makes this particular piece Islamic?  (Due Sunday by 11:59 PM CT)
Participation or Response
Points can be gained by active and frequent online class participation in excess of assigned posting discussions. Each week you will have the opportunity to earn five participation points. Points are earned by posting at least two meaningful, substantive, and academic responses to other students’ postings, clarifying one of their questions, or posting a meaningful question or point in need of clarification. Substantive responses are more than a sentence or two long.
Quiz #1
Complete Quiz #1 available in the Quizzes area of the course no later than Sunday at 11:59pm CT.
Dropbox 1
Dropbox 1: Thesis and Introduction draft: Submit a document with a draft of your introductory paragraph for your midterm paper to the dropbox.  Your draft must include a clear thesis statement (answer to your research question) and should consider the midterm paper guidelines and requirements. For additional help, review the paper writing information available in the Content and Links areas of the course.
Reading Assignments (67 pgs)
Everyday Life in South Asia
• Introduction to Part V: Nation-Making – pg. 309
• Voices from the Partition – pg. 314
• A Day in the Life – pg. 328
• Living and Dying for Mother India – pg. 343
• Interviews with High School Students in Eastern Sri Lanka – pg. 384
• Unexpected Destinations – pg. 487
Document Analysis #4
Consider what you learned about Partition.  How might those experiences have shaped the Hindu nationalist (Hindutva) worldview exhibited in “Living and Dying for Mother India”?  What other social and cultural factors might encourage a Hindu nationalist stance?  How do the women in “A Day in the Life” respond to underlying ethnic tensions?  Are there any similarities between the women in these two readings?  (Due Wednesday by 11:59 PM CT)
Roundtable Discussion #4
Give some examples of the difficulties that Tamils have encountered in trying to immigrate, legally or illegally, in order to seek asylum in Western countries. At the end of this chapter the author suggests that racism and xenophobia play a role in British policy makers’ reluctance to grant asylum to Tamils. What do you think of this argument?  (Due Friday by 11:59 PM CT)
Online Investigation #3

Go to the Content area of the course.Read the BBC’s explanation of the conflict in Kashmir and familiarize yourself with the situation (read the first three sections of “Q&A: Kashmir Dispute". View the short slideshow presentation provided here by PBS’ Frontline

For the Online Investigation #3 posting answer the following questions:  How do you believe Kashmiri culture and society have been shaped by this conflict?  Can you see some aspects of Kashmiri culture in the slideshow that exist independently of the conflict?  (Due Friday by 11:59 PM CT)

Participation or Response
Points can be gained by active and frequent online class participation in excess of assigned posting discussions. Each week you will have the opportunity to earn five participation points. Points are earned by posting at least two meaningful, substantive, and academic responses to other students’ postings, clarifying one of their questions, or posting a meaningful question or point in need of clarification. Substantive responses are more than a sentence or two long.
Midterm Research Paper
The midterm paper is due to the dropbox by Sunday of Week 4. The midterm paper must be a 4-5 page formal exploration of a topic in South Asian culture and society. The paper must be based on scholarly research and should include headings, assignment number and title, and be double-spaced with 12 point font, 1 inch margins.The title page and bibliography/works cited do not count towards the page minimum of written content. The midterm paper is worth 35 points, assigned on the basis of percent of completeness, strength of main argument, structure, thoughtfulness, and readability. 
Reading Assignments (69 pgs)
Everyday Life in South Asia
• Introduction to Part VI: Globalization, Public Culture, and the South Asian Diaspora – pg. 399 (note: you read this introduction in SACS 101, but it is material that you will want fresh in your mind as you read the other articles for this week)
• Examining the “Global” Indian Middle Class: Gender and Culture in the Silicon Valley/Bangalore Circuit – pg.  461  
• A Diaspora Ramayana in Southall – pg. 436
• British Sikh Lives Lived in Translation – pg. 448
• Placing Lives Through Stories: Second Generation South Asian Americans – pg. 472

Online Readings (links found in Content area of the course)
•    Harvesting Identities: Youth, Work, and Gender in the Indian Himalayas in Annals of the Association of American Geographers (pgs. 164-175 only, beginning with the section entitled “Rural Livelihoods in Uttarakhand”)
Document Analysis #5
Harvesting Identities” not only introduces us to the lives of people who are living on the very fringes of the reach of globalization, it also addresses many of the themes that we have covered in earlier weeks.  Are there any ways in which globalization and “modern” consumption patterns have reached the lives of the youths described in the article?  What are some of the aspects of the article and the youths’ lives that deal with earlier themes and readings in this course?  (Due Wednesday by 11:59 PM CT)
Roundtable Discussion #5
How do the readings illustrate changing norms of marriage, family, and gender? What role do global cultural flows have to play in these changing norms?  Be sure to give specific examples from the readings.  (Due Friday by 11:59 PM CT)
Participation or Response
Points can be gained by active and frequent online class participation in excess of assigned posting discussions. Each week you will have the opportunity to earn five participation points. Points are earned by posting at least two meaningful, substantive, and academic responses to other students’ postings, clarifying one of their questions, or posting a meaningful question or point in need of clarification. Substantive responses are more than a sentence or two long.
Reading Assignments (58 pgs)
Mondays on the Dark Night of the Moon

(We will read from the Introduction through Chapter 3: First Sour, Then Sweet)
  • Introduction – pg. 3
  • Mondays on the Dark Night of the Moon – pg. 25
  • Across the Seven Seas – pg. 27
  • The Five Days of Fasting – pg. 39
  • Daughter, My Little Bread! – pg. 41
  • First Sour, Then Sweet – pg. 50
Document Analysis #6
What important social norms and values are communicated by the stories in the first section of ritual tales? Give at least two examples from the readings. (Due Wednesday by 11:59 PM CT)
Roundtable Discussion #6
In the introduction, what worries does the author have about being a “real” anthropologist? Do you think these concerns are justified? Can a “real” anthropologist or social science researcher study his/her own society? (Due Friday by 11:59 PM CT)
Participation or Response
Points can be gained by active and frequent online class participation in excess of assigned posting discussions. Each week you will have the opportunity to earn five participation points. Points are earned by posting at least two meaningful, substantive, and academic responses to other students’ postings, clarifying one of their questions, or posting a meaningful question or point in need of clarification. Substantive responses are more than a sentence or two long.
Dropbox 2: Sources/Updated topic (if applicable)
  • If you are selecting Option 1 from above, submit a document with at least 3 additional sources, sources not previously used in the midterm paper that will support your final paper. Sources must be from the Stafford Library and should be ebooks or articles. Provide a citation in proper APA or MLA style and at least two sentences describing how each source will help you edit and develop your paper.
  • If you are selecting Option 2 from above, submit a document with a new suggested topic, at least 3 sources that will support your final paper and pose the question you anticipate answering with your thesis statement. Sources must be from the Stafford Library and should be ebooks or articles. Provide a citation in proper APA or MLA style and at least two sentences describing how each source will help you develop your paper.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Reading Assignments (71 pgs)
Mondays on the Dark Night of the Moon
(Read from Chapter 4: The Daughter-in-Law With No Groom through Chapter 12: Earth into Gold)
•    The Daughter-in-Law With No Groom – pg. 59
•    The Frog Groom – pg. 64
•    The Fragrant Melon – pg. 70
•    Under the Berry Bush – pg. 79
•    The Female Weevil Who Fasted – pg. 88
•    The Dog-Girl – pg. 95
•    The Skein Woman – pg. 101
•    The Thunder Thread – pg. 107
•    The Twelve Years of Affliction – pg. 109
•    Earth into Gold – pg. 125
Document Analysis #7
What family hierarchies do these stories reveal? What relationship tensions do these stories reveal? Describe these tensions and hierarchies using details from the readings. (Due Wednesday by 11:59 PM CT)
Roundtable Discussion #7
What do the story and the commentary about “The Dog-Girl” teach us about South Asian conceptions of purity and pollution? What are some behaviors we practice in the United States to maintain physical or spiritual purity? (Due Friday by 11:59 PM CT)
Online Investigation #4

Go to the Content area of the course and follow the instructions found in the Online Investigation #4 Assignment.  You’ll be reading a synopsis of the Ramayan.

Online Investigation #4 posting answer the following questions: Which aspect of the Ramayana does Paley choose to emphasize in her telling?  How does her emphasis differ from tellings more embedded in South Asian cultures?  Do you think it is acceptable to draw inspiration from the religiously significant works of other cultures, blend it with your own experiences and agendas, and thereby create a new interpretation?  Is it equally acceptable or unacceptable to do that with an artifact from your own religion or culture?  (Due Friday by 11:59 PM CT)

Participation or Response
Points can be gained by active and frequent online class participation in excess of assigned posting discussions. Each week you will have the opportunity to earn five participation points. Points are earned by posting at least two meaningful, substantive, and academic responses to other students’ postings, clarifying one of their questions, or posting a meaningful question or point in need of clarification. Substantive responses are more than a sentence or two long.
Quiz #2
Complete Quiz #2 available in the Quizzes area of the course no later than Sunday at 11:59pm CT.
Reading Assignments (34 pgs)
Mondays on the Dark Night of the Moon
(We will read from Divining Destiny and Rebirth through Chapter 16: The Two Gems)
•    Divining Destiny and Rebirth – pg. 133
•    In the Court of Destiny – pg. 135
•    The Floating Flower – pg. 147
•    Heaven and Hell – pg. 154
•    The Two Gems – pg. 159

Document Analysis #8
How is caste presented and understood within the context of these stories and commentaries? Give at least two specific examples from the readings. (Due Wednesday by 11:59 PM CT)
Roundtable Discussion #8
We learn some things from "Chapter 15: Heaven and Hell" about the results of good and bad actions: What Hindu terminology is used to describe the results of good and bad actions? What are the two different kinds of good actions outlined at the end of the chapter? How does the use of dharma here compare to our discussion in SACS 101 of dharma and karma as concepts? (Due Thursday by 11:59 PM CT)
Participation or Response
Points can be gained by active and frequent online class participation in excess of assigned posting discussions. Each week you will have the opportunity to earn five participation points. Points are earned by posting at least two meaningful, substantive, and academic responses to other students’ postings, clarifying one of their questions, or posting a meaningful question or point in need of clarification. Substantive responses are more than a sentence or two long.
Final Research Paper
The final paper is due to the dropbox by Saturday of Week 8. The final paper must be an 8-10 page research paper on a topic of your choosing. The midterm paper can be developed into the final paper with permission. Papers should have headings, a title, double-spaced, 12 point font, 1 inch margins, citations, and bibliography. The title page and bibliography/works cited do not count towards the 8-10 page minimum of written content. The paper should be a scholarly investigation of a topic in the area of South Asian culture/society. You should utilize and cite at least six sources, three of which must be outside of assigned course readings.I will post a list of suggested topics and texts in the Course Content area as well as a series of documents designed to aid you in the writing process.The assignment is meant to be an enjoyable opportunity to be creative and explore a topic that interests you.The final paper is worth 95 points and will be graded according to the point system presented in the assignment table below and the rubric provided in the Content area. 

  Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

No late assignments will be accepted without extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the student. All assignments are due in accordance with Central Time.  The instructor must be notified prior to the due date of the assignment if you intend to turn it in late and documentation supporting your extenuating circumstance may be required.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

  Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.