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Online classes

Effective: Late Spring 8-Week, 2017/2018

ECON 294: Microeconomics

Course Description

Introduction to specific economic units and to individual markets and individual interactions within an economy.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Miller, Roger LeRoy. Economics Today, Custom Package. 19th ed. New Jersey: Pearson, 2017.
    • ISBN-978-1-323-82770-3
      • Note: This course uses a VitalSource ebook. If you wish to have a print book, it can be ordered as a loose-leaf print on demand book through VitalSource. Please note there is a cost for this, and financial aid book vouchers cannot be used for this purchase. Once orders are placed, it can take approximately 5-7 business days for you to receive your print on demand book. The ebook comes with an access code for MyEconLab which is where the electronic homework for this course is performed. We utilize many of the available resources including videos, podcasts, animations (narrated interactive PowerPoints), web links and homework assignments. These features can found on a chapter-by-chapter basis once you have processed access to MyEconLab.

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Welcome to Microeconomics Online!

It is hard to improve upon this overview of economics in general provided to the world by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco:

The word "economics" is derived from the Greek "oikonomikos," which means skilled in household management. Although the word is very old, the discipline of economics as we understand it today is a relatively recent development. Modern economic thought emerged in the 17th and 18th centuries as the western world began its transformation from an agrarian to an industrial society.  

Despite the enormous differences between then and now, the economic problems with which society struggles remain the same:

  • How do we decide what to produce with our limited resources?
  • How do we ensure stable prices and full employment of our resources?
  • How do we provide a rising standard of living both for ourselves and for future generations?

The study of economics may be undertaken from a macro perspective of overall economic activity or a micro perspective of individual decision making in typical households, businesses, or governmental units.

This is a course in microeconomics. Our study of microeconomics will involve learning some new terminology and microeconomic theory. Think of it as a study of market processes and outcomes; what they mean, how they happen, and what we can and can't do about them! Our journey will make extensive use of something called “marginal analysis,” which will help us to examine decisions made by consumers and producers. 

Together we will provide some provisional answers to the following questions: 

  • What determines the price of a product?
  • Why do some seemingly unrelated events cause prices to change?
  • How are wages determined? 
  • What are the key characteristics of product, resource, and financial markets? 
  • What are the structural differences between different types of product, labor, natural resource, financial, and international markets? 
  • What are the concepts of economic efficiency and economic equity?
  • What are the major public policy approaches for ameliorating inefficient and/or inequitable processes and outcomes in product and resource markets?
Our interaction will be based on weekly readings from the text supplemented by online learning resources and discussions.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office
  • a MyEconLab Access Code

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Draw supply and demand curves and manipulate these curves when explaining changes in product markets.
  2. Explain the concept of elasticity, including price elasticity of demand, price elasticity of supply, income elasticity, and cross-price elasticity and the use of these concepts in explaining the response of supply and demand.
  3. Describe the concepts of production and cost in both the short run and long run; explain the relationship between production and cost outcomes.
  4. Identify the four types of market structure and describe the characteristics of each; explain how cost, price, efficiency, and profit relate to each of these market structures.
  5. Describe and explain government involvement in the economy to eliminate market failures; describe the impact of government action of efficiency and equity.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (5) 200 20%
Dropbox Assignments (4) 200 20%
MyEconLab (8) 200 20%
Exams (2) 400 40%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 40 Thursday/Sunday
Dropbox 1: Famous Entrepreneur 50 Saturday
MyEconLab 1 25 Sunday
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 40 Thursday/Sunday
MyEconLab 2 25 Sunday
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Dropbox 2: Elasticity 50 Saturday
MyEconLab 3 25 Sunday
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 40 Thursday/Sunday
MyEconLab 4 25 Sunday
Midterm Examination 200
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Dropbox 3: Differentiating Products 50 Saturday
MyEconLab 5 25 Sunday
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 40 Thursday/Sunday
MyEconLab 6 25 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Dropbox 4: Economics of Healthcare 50 Saturday
MyEconLab 7 25 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 40 Thursday/Saturday
MyEconLab 8 25 Saturday
Final Examination 200
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Readings

Complete all assigned weekly readings prior to submitting assignments or taking quizzes for the week so the concepts covered can inform your work.

Discussions

There will be discussion posts assigned for every even numbered week plus Week 1. Discussions should be completed after the readings and prior to quizzes or exams during a given week. Review the “Discussion Instructions” posted for each week in the Content area for detailed guidance. Failure to read this lead posting is the single most common reason for lower scores on discussions. Each discussion assignment is worth 40 points for the week. There are two due dates for discussions:

  • The first post assignment is due by at 11:59 pm CT Thursday.

  • A minimum of three follow-up posts or replies to other students are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday (except for the last week when the follow-up is due Saturday 11:59 pm CT).

Points will be calculated based on the quality of the initial post: how well it relates to the topic at hand, completeness, and level of interaction with fellow students in the initial post. Points are not given for mere chat. Because the online discussion mirrors a discussion in a classroom, another important component of discussion postings is the responsive posts to classmates. Students who do not respond to their classmates or wait until the final hours of the last day of the week will receive less credit than those who actively engage in discussions. Discussions will be evaluated each week according to the standards in the Grading Criteria section below. No late discussion posts will be accepted.


Dropbox Assignments

Dropbox assignments are short research/analysis assignments comprised of one question and/or activity. Dropbox paper subjects are chosen to reinforce the week's material, and should be viewed as an opportunity to display mastery of that unit's work. Dropbox assignments are worth 50 points, assigned on the basis of percent of completeness, correct concept analysis, spelling, and grammar.

Each dropbox paper should be around two pages in length and submitted as one assignment saved as a MS Word (.doc/.docx) or .rtf (Rich Text Format) file. They should be superior work, edited carefully for grammar and style, and also include a separate cover page and works cited/references. Good dropbox assignments contain relevant references properly cited using APA or Chicago Manual of Style.

In many cases, students draw from the text and the resources in MyEconLab to complete the dropbox assignment. If a student’s answer references a source other than the text, the student should cite this reference according to the APA or Chicago Manual of Style. The use of any secondary reference without providing citation is plagiarism and will receive a score of 0. Also, work done in a previous course, in whole or in part, is regarded as plagiarism and will not be accepted. Repeated incidents of plagiarism are reported to the Academic Affairs Office and the student receives an “F “grade in the course.

Punctuality is vital in order to receive full credit. Each weekly dropbox assignment is due at 11:59 pm CT  Saturday for the week it is due. Late assignments are penalized 5 points per day late beginning at 5 points for the 1st day late, 10 points for the 2nd and so forth up to 50 pts. No late dropboxes will be accepted (i.e. graded) two weeks after the original due date. Students are responsible for making sure that any late dropboxes have been submitted prior to that time.


MyEconLab Homework

Each week, there will be between 17 and 30 questions to complete in MyEconLab (http://www.myeconlab.com). There are 8 MyEconLab modules, one for every week, worth 25 points each. Each module will open on Monday and close on the following Sunday at 11:59 pm CT except for the last week when the module closes on Saturday. Students have two attempts at every homework problem. There is no time limit and problems for each week may be accessed multiple times. Upon submission, results will be automatically scored and immediately available for viewing. Detailed results of submissions, including correct and incorrect answers, will be made available for viewing only after the deadline for submission has passed. Students are encouraged to use the text (paying particular attention to "key graphs") and the resources in MyEconLab accompanying the text as resources. 

Each student is responsible for observing the rules regarding academic honesty noted above in regard to homework on MyEconLab. 

Homework answers submitted in error: The advantage of having two attempts at each question comes with a cost. Once an answer is submitted, those answers are unchangeable. If the student erroneously checks a wrong selection, or superimposes or misaligns their answer electronically from what they had intended, the answer is deemed to be the student’s final answer for that attempt. The student assumes all responsibility for submitting their intended choices.

Make-up MyEconLab assignments are allowed only for exceptional circumstances as detailed in the Late Assignments Policy.

Midterm and Final Exams

There will be a midterm and final exam, each worth 200 points. Each exam will consist of between 50 to 75 multiple-choice questions, are open book, timed and taken online. The final exam is cumulative, covering material over the whole course. These tests are administered without a proctor under the assumption that the student has read this syllabus in general, particularly the section on academic honesty. Exams are given during the week in which they occur and like the quizzes, open on Monday and close on the deadline for submissions. Submitted exams will be acknowledged, the score posted, and returned only following the weekly deadline for submission. Make-up examinations are allowed only for approved reasons and excused absences. 

Note: You will have exactly 240 minutes to complete this exam.  If you log out, the time will continue to run. You are responsible for your own answers and allowed only one final submission. Upon submission, the results will be automatically scored and thus immediately available for review in the "Grades" section. Detailed results of submissions, including correct and incorrect answers, will be made available for viewing only after the deadline for submission has passed.

Exams submitted in error: The advantage of open-note exams comes with a cost. Once an exam is submitted, those answers are unchangeable. If the student erroneously checks a wrong selection or superimposes or misaligns their answer electronically from what they had intended, the answer is deemed to be the student’s final answer. The student assumes all responsibility for submitting their intended choices.

Exams not submitted: The submission of an exam is a function performed by the student when clicking the “submit” button in the module. If a student tries to send their responses via e-mail to the instructor, D2L or the Technology Solutions Center (http://web.ccis.edu/Offices/TechnologyServices/Support.aspx), this is deemed “not submitted” and receives a score of 0. Because each student is given 5 days to submit their quizzes and exams, “My ISP is down,” or “my computer broke,” or “the website is slow,” are never valid excuses to not submit a quiz or exam.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Course Introduction; Economics, Economic Problems, & the Issue of Scarcity
Focus
Creating a community of economic scholars; understanding economics as a study, economic problems, and the market economy of the United States. Understanding how economic reasoning is unique and focuses on scarcity. Meet and examine some exemplary entrepreneurs.
Readings

Read and Study:

  • Chapter 1: The Nature of Economics
  • Chapter 1: Appendix
  • Chapter 2: Scarcity and the World of Tradeoffs
Webquests
  • ECON 294 Course: Familiarize yourself with Desire2Learn and the course by browsing around and exploring the syllabus. You may want to print it out and/or save it electronically.
  • MyEconLab: Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Familiarize yourself with this website and learn to navigate the resources for each chapter.
  • Links (optional): Two notable Internet sources for economic concepts are AmosWEB and Khan Academy for Microeconomics for a collection of easy to understand videos. These resources are available in the Content area.

Brushing Up Needed? Having trouble with the graphs after doing the readings? See the Content area for more resources.

Discussion 1
Please introduce yourself, and your choice of one Nobel Laureate in Economics. In your introduction of the Nobel Laureate, make sure to explain the theory or contribution that led to their prize. Additional details and requirements for this assignment can be found in the Week 1 Content area. Do not duplicate a selection of your classmates or you will be asked to re-post. Respond at will to your fellow students' postings.
Dropbox 1: Famous Entrepreneur
Your assignment is to write a short (2-3 page, double-spaced, typed) essay and upload it to the Week 1 dropbox by 11:59 pm CT Saturday. Identify at least one important entrepreneur that you would consider an "entrepreneurial legend" and state why you consider the person to be (or have been) exemplary. You must also identify at least one economic decision made by this entrepreneur that was significant in their success and provide a detailed example of that decision. Your reason for selecting the person should include examples of managerial economics and should include other criteria such as social responsibility and ethics. Remember to cite your authority and be careful not to plagiarize. Details for this assignment can be found in the Week 1 Content area.
MyEconLab 1
Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Click on Week 1 under Assignments and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Week 2: General Analysis of Market Supply and Demand
Focus
Developing theoretical understanding of market forces in the context of the classic "supply and demand" model. Understanding how equilibrium prices and quantities are determined in markets and why they change
Readings

Read and Study:

  • Chapter 3: Demand and Supply
  • Chapter 4: Extensions of Demand and Supply
Webquests

Web (optional): Visit Kim Sosin's very fine Online Lesson in Supply and Demand, as well as AmosWEB’s series on “elasticity” in the Content area.

MyEconLab: Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Familiarize yourself with the resources for Chapters 3 and 4.

Discussion 2

Select a market for a product or service, then identify at least one critical determinant of demand or supply in that selected market and forecast a reasonable future change in the determinant. Explain the changes in equilibrium price and quantity you expect for that market. A graph is not required, however, it is helpful and illustrative that you fully comprehends this week’s material.

Hint: To economists, the word “determinant” has special significance. Please pay particular attention to the listed determinants in Chapter 3 prior to posting.

MyEconLab 2
Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Click on Week 2 under Assignments and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Week 3: Marginal Analysis, Elasticity and the Foundations of Individual Economic Choices
Focus
Understanding the concept of elasticity and implications of elasticity for the magnitude of changes in revenues, prices and quantities that business managers face. Understanding basic consumer rationality and  concept of utility and how marginal analysis examines the changes in utility as consumption changes.
Readings

Read and Study:

  • Chapter 19: Demand and Supply Elasticity
  • Chapter 20: Consumer Choice
Webquests

MyEconLab: Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Familiarize yourself with the resources for Chapters 19 and 20.

Dropbox 2: Elasticity
Your assignment is to write a short (2-3 page, double-spaced, typed) essay identifying and describing two markets of your choosing; the first characterized by an elastic demand and the second one by an inelastic demand. Indicate why your choices have the relative elasticities they do. Hint: Use the determinants of elasticity to sort why some products are elastic and others are inelastic.
  • Market One: What are some of the goods you purchase in your life for which your demand is most elastic? Why?
  • Market Two: What are some of the goods you purchase in your life for which your demand is highly inelastic? Why?

Draw upon Chapter 19 for your analysis. This will be graded using the “Evaluation of Written Assignments” rubric.

(Hint: Use the determinants of elasticity to sort why your choices in Market One are elastic and why the choices in Market Two are inelastic).

MyEconLab 3
Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Click on Week 3 under Assignments and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Week 4: Microeconomics of Product Markets: Competition and Monopoly
Focus
Understanding basic employer rationality in maximizing production at minimum cost. Using Marginal Analysis for these rational production decisions. Identification of the characteristics of pure competition and monopoly product markets, understanding of the implications of these market structures for rational managerial decisions involving production and pricing, and understanding the results from perspectives of efficiency and equity.
Readings

Read and Study:

  • Chapter 22: The Firm, Costs and Output Determination
  • Chapter 23: Perfect Competition
  • Chapter 24: Monopoly
Webquests

MyEconLab: Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Familiarize yourself with the resources for Chapters 22, 23, and 24.

Discussion 3

Identify a particular industry (non-government) that meets the criteria for Pure Competition or Monopoly. Explain clearly why you think the industry is in Pure Competition or is a Monopoly and evaluate it from perspectives of efficiency and equity. You may post to both categories, but are required to only select one. Keep in mind there are four market structures and we study Monopolistic Competition and Oligopoly next week. Read the Discussion Instructions for Week 4 and identify the market characteristics, productive efficiency, allocative efficiency, and equity in the particular industry that you selected.

  • Note: Do not duplicate an example in the text, lead post or a selection from one of your classmates or you will be asked to re-post.
MyEconLab 4
Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Click on Week 4 under Assignments and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Midterm Examination
You are asked to take an online midterm over the first four weeks of the course (Chapters 1-4, 19-20, 22-24). The ECON Midterm Examination is available in the Quizzes area. This exam is open-book, does not have a proctor, and will remain open only during the indicated time interval. Answers are recorded by clicking on the one best selection of the multiple choices. You may access to complete individual questions, log out, and return to edit or change prior answers or to complete the quiz before the quiz deadline. If you print the quiz out and return to select answers, be careful to read all the choices again as these choices randomize on different logins for some questions. You are responsible for your own answers and allowed only one final submission. You will be able to see your score immediately upon submission, but not the correct answers until the deadline for submissions has passed. You will be able to return to the exam and compare your answers with the correct answers by clicking on the exam, then "Submissions," and then "Attempt 1" following the submission deadline.
Week 5: Microeconomics of Product Markets, Cont'd: Monopolistic Competition & Oligopoly
Focus
Identification of the characteristics of monopolistically competitive and oligopolistic product markets, understanding the implications of these market structures for rational managerial decisions involving production and pricing, and understanding of the results from perspectives of efficiency and equity.
Readings

Read and Study:

  • Chapter 25: Monopolistic Competition
  • Chapter 26: Oligopoly and Strategic Behavior
Webquests

MyEconLab: Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Familiarize yourself with the resources for Chapters 25 and 26.

Dropbox 3: Differentiating Products

Write a short (2-3 page, double-spaced, typed) essay identifying and describing the conditions you observed for a business in Monopolistic Competition or a Differentiated Oligopoly who differentiates their product. Your paper should also provide brief market analysis including the state of the market before and after the differentiation, as well as the observed changes that resulted. Specifically, the following questions should be addressed:

    • What type of market structure was the product or service in when the differentiation occurred?
    • What is the differentiation?  Describe specifically what the differentiation was and tell us what that means for rational business price and production decisions.
    • What was the observed change in the equilibrium price and quantity in the market, as well as the company?
    • Evaluate the result of the observed change from perspectives of efficiency and equity drawing upon price/cost margins for your explanation.
    • Evaluate whether the decision to differentiate the product was a good move for that business at that time.

Evaluate whether the decision to differentiate the product was a good economic decision for that business at that time. That is, were economic or normal profits realized as a result?

MyEconLab 5
Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Click on Week 5 under Assignments and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Week 6: Microeconomics of Resource Markets: The Market for Labor and Income Inequalities
Focus
Understanding the determination of wage levels and differences in various labor market structures. Understanding the influence of unions as well as the issues involving earnings and income differences, poverty, discrimination, and outsourcing from perspectives of economic efficiency and equity.
Readings

Read and Study:

  • Chapter 28: The Labor Market: Demand, Supply and Outsourcing
  • Chapter 29: Unions and Labor Market Monopoly Power
  • Chapter 30: Income, Poverty and Healthcare (p. 691 – 701)
Webquests

MyEconLab: Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Familiarize yourself with the resources for Chapters 28, 29, and 30 (pages 691–701)

Discussion 4
For Week 6 you will find two topics. Select one topic, then post and concisely defend your view. You may post to both topics,but are required to only select one for your initial post. Be careful to identify the positive reasons for your normative position. Read and respond to your fellow student's postings at will. The topics to choose from are:
  1. Examples of Outsourcing. Identify one example of outsourcing that you have observed or desire to research. Be certain to apply the economic analysis of Chapter 28 in your post and tell us what you believe was the most significant economic factor in the outsourcing you described. Examine the labor and product markets involved. Lastly, should there be any changes you would favor to any laws or regulations that accommodated the outsourcing?
  2. Determinants of Income Differences. Identify one of the determinants of income differences as enumerated in Chapter 30 which you have personally observed or desire to research. Be certain to tell us what you believe was the most significant economic factor in determining the wages for the labor market you selected. Lastly, should there be any changes you would favor to income policies and why?

Note: A post that merely recites an example, without offering economic analysis or responding to the questions assigned, garners few points.

MyEconLab 6
Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Click on Week 6 under Assignments and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Resource Markets, Continued: The Markets for Land, Capital, and Entrepreneurs and the Economics of Health Care
Focus
Understanding of supply and demand in the markets for land, capital, and entrepreneurship. Understanding the predominant economic issues in the health-care industry from a microeconomic perspective.
Readings

Read and Study:

  • Chapter 21: Rents, Profits, and the Financial Environment of Business
  • Chapter 30: Income, Poverty and Healthcare (p. 702 – 715) 
Webquests

MyEconLab: Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Familiarize yourself with the resources for Chapters 21, and 30 (pages 702-715).

Dropbox 4: Economics of Healthcare
Write a short (2-3 page, double-spaced, typed) essay identifying and describing the current state of the health care industry using the Microeconomic concepts and tools we have studied this semester. You will find an overview of the economics of health care in chapter 30 and a discussion of Medicare in Chapter 5. Also, a list of pros and cons related to this industry along with a short explanation of health insurance and how it relates to the debate is in the Content area. You are asked to develop your own solution to this social issue. In your essay, please answer in terms of what you think is the socially optimal solution versus the economic least cost solution, but you must understand and explain the economic costs of your decision.
MyEconLab 7
Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Click on Week 7 under Assignments and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Week 8: Microeconomics of Government
Focus

Understanding and defining the characteristics of public goods, common resources and why private markets fail to provide public goods. Understanding what an externality is and common examples of externalities in the economy as well as government policies aimed at solving the problem of externalities. Understanding the role of the public sector and tax policy from a microeconmic perspective.

IT’S A SHORT WEEK! Remember the Final Exam, dropbox and responsive discussions are due by Saturday!

Readings

Read and Study:

  • Chapter 5: Public Spending and Public Choice
  • Chapter 6: Funding the Public Sector
  • Chapter 27: Regulation and Antitrust Policy in a Globalized Economy
Webquests

MyEconLab: Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Familiarize yourself with the resources for Chapters 5, 6, and 27.

Discussion 5
For Week 8 you will find two topics. Select one topic, then post and concisely defend your view. You may post to both topics, but are required to only select one for your initial post. Be careful to identify the positive reasons for your normative position. Read and respond to your fellow student's postings at will. The topics to choose from are:
  1. Select a Government Regulation. Identify a particular government regulation of your choosing that in your opinion has either been successful or a failure. Briefly state the original purpose of this regulation and whether it has changed over time. Then, concisely defend your view on whether you favor the expansion or reduction of the enforcing regulatory agency.
  2. Anti-trust Measures. Identify a particular market that has experienced government anti-trust efforts or you think should have antitrust efforts. Analyze what type of market structure was in existence at the time of the anti-trust measures or is in currently. Then justify whether the market justified(s) the intervention.
MyEconLab 8
Visit the MyEconLab website (http://www.myeconlab.com/) for our course that accompanies your text. Click on Week 8 under Assignments and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Final Examination
You are asked to take a comprehensive, online final examination by midnight Saturday. The ECON 294 final examination, with additional instructions, is available in the Quizzes area.
  • This exam is open book, does not have a proctor, and will remain open only during the indicated time interval. Answers are recorded by clicking on the one best selection of the multiple choices. You may access the exam, log out, and/or return to edit or change prior answers to complete the exam prior to the deadline. If you print the exam and return to select answers, be careful to read all the choices again as these choices randomize on different logins for some questions.
  • You are responsible for your answers and are only allowed one final submission. You will be able to see your score immediately upon submission, but not the correct answers until the deadline for submission has passed. You will be able to return to the exam and compare your answers with the correct answers by clicking on the exam, then "Submissions," and then "Attempt 1."


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

The Late Assignment Policy operates on the assumption that submitting assignments is the student’s responsibility.

Dropbox Assignments that are late may be turned in for partial credit. That is, all late dropboxes receive a late penalty of five points per day. For late dropboxes, there is a minimum five point deduction per day. No late dropboxes will be accepted (i.e. graded) two weeks after original assigned week ends nor after the course has ended. All dropboxes must be uploaded in the D2L module for the appropriate week. The instructor will not accept dropboxes via e-mail.

My EconLab assignments that are late may be completed for partial credit. That is, all late My EconLab assignments will receive a late penalty of three points per day. Late My EconLab assignments will only be accepted up to one week after the original assigned week closes. Subsequent submissions will receive no credit, unless approved by the instructor.

Exams are scheduled for weeks four and eight. Once that week has passed the opportunity to take the exam expires. The one exception is for a documented emergency, such as a medical condition. If an emergency can be shown, make-up credit will be allowed once approved by the instructor and the emergency circumstances have been confirmed. Once the course has ended the opportunity to earn points terminates.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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