Skip to main content

Search Bar Icon Close Menu

Online classes

Effective: Late Spring 8-Week, 2017/2018

ARTS 152: Digital Photography

Course Description

Introduction to digital photographic imagery. Students explore a variety of creative techniques for digital artists and graphic designers. Students learn the fundamentals of digital camera operations and a variety of creative techniques for manipulating photographic images using Photoshop. Topics include a digital portfolio of images for presentation that includes: still life, self-portraits, documentation, landscape, special effect, surrealism, night photography and more. Digital camera required (adjustable, high end; not a point and shoot).

Prerequisite: None

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • London, B., & Stone, J.. (2015). A Short Course in Digital Photography (3rd). Boston: Pearson.
    • [ISBN-978-0-205-99825-8]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

In this course, you will create new digital photographic images by combining fundamental photographic skills with digital camera technology and basic image editing technology. A primary goal of the course is the use of photography as a means of personal expression and solving visual problems that are specific to photography.

Emphasis will be placed on camera operation, photographic techniques, composition and application of design principles. No prior art experience is required, as this class is designed for the beginning digital photographer; however, those with prior skill will be able to build on their foundation. All images must be shot on or after the class start date with a digital single lens reflex (DSLR), four-thirds, or high-end point and shoot camera that has manual override capabilities.

You will explore a range of subject matter and topics through the application of camera use and learning to use a digital camera to visually solve problems specific to photography. The focuses on the assignments involve in-camera shooting techniques to demonstrate spatial use, eye movement, and balance. You are encouraged to explore the visual impact, mood, and emotional reaction through photography to demonstrate meaning to the viewer in a creative way.

You will learn how to use image editing software to prepare images for proper technical presentation in classroom discussion-critiques and Dropbox assignments. You will learn image editing basics, including proper image adjustments, file sizing, color correction and color conversion, excluding filter use, dramatic color shifts, and extreme cropping.

To promote a learning community, you will learn to critique photographs from a design-based point of view. You are required to share one or more photograph each week to the critique, along with technical information. Additionally, you have to respond to two of your classmates’ photographs, offering suggestions, asking clarifying questions, and stimulating dialogue related to the topic of the week. Weekly critiques serve the purpose of providing a format in which you can improve your photography prior to submitting your work for grading.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

You must also have access to a digital camera and image editing software to complete this course.

  1. Digital Camera:  Recommended: Digital Single-Lens Reflex (DSLR).
  2. Image-editing Software: Recommended: Adobe Photoshop CC, CS6 or Adobe Photoshop CS6 Extended. Other image editing software may be used, such as older versions of Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Adobe Lightroom, Gimp, etc. Please allow time for ordering and installation of software.

Course Objectives

  • To learn proper digital camera operation.
  • To learn color evaluation and color correction techniques.
  • To explore experimental lighting and digital special effects.
  • To learn proper resample techniques.
  • To learn basic digital image enhancements using Photoshop.
  • To present digital photographs using basic design principles.
  • To identify the fundamental design elements and know how to use them effectively.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Identify the essential equipment and software needed to produce quality digital images.
  • Create proper exposure by accurately combining film speed, aperture, shutter speed, and depth of field to utilize lighting conditions
  • Evaluate levels, curves, density and contrast in a digital image.
  • Use digital, burning, dodging, cropping, and toning to improve the look of photographs.
  • Identify the fundamental design elements and know how to use them effectively
  • Learn to use digital editing confidently.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 1350-1500 90-100%
B 1200-1349 80-89%
C 1050-1199 70-79%
D 900-1049 60-69%
F 0-899 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (9) 300 20%
Shooting Assignments (8) 800 53%
Quizzes (8) 400 27%
Total 1500 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion 20 Thursday
Discussion 1 35 Thursday/Sunday
Shooting Assignment 1 100 Sunday
Quiz 1 50
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 35 Thursday/Sunday
Shooting Assignment 2 100 Sunday
Quiz 2 50
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 35 Thursday/Sunday
Shooting Assignment 3 100 Sunday
Quiz 3 50
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 35 Thursday/Sunday
Shooting Assignment 4 100 Sunday
Quiz 4 50
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 35 Thursday/Sunday
Shooting Assignment 5 100 Sunday
Quiz 5 50
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6 35 Thursday/Sunday
Shooting Assignment 6 100 Sunday
Quiz 6 50
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 35 Thursday/Sunday
Shooting Assignment 7 100 Sunday
Quiz 7 50
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 35 Thursday/Saturday
Shooting Assignment 8 100 Saturday
Quiz 8 50
Total Points 1500

Assignment Overview

Discussions

There is one (1) Introduction discussion (due Thursday by 11:59 p.m. CT of Week 1) and eight other discussions in the course. You must post your original response to each discussion topic by 11:59 p.m. CT, Thursday. All original posts should include one properly-sized photograph along with technical shooting information and a short statement about the photograph. The short statement should include approximately 1 paragraph or 150-200 words, excluding technical information.

You must then respond to at least two other students’ initial responses for each discussion topic by 11:59 p.m. CT, Sunday of each week (except in Week 8, when your responses are due by 11: 59 p.m. CT, Saturday). Each response should be approximately 1 paragraph or 150-200 words. It should offer suggestions, ask clarifying questions, and stimulate dialogue related to the topic of the week.

Discussion posts should include references in APA format if external material is cited. Each original post is worth 25 points (except the for introductory post, which is worth 20 points) and two responses are worth 5 points each. Combined, the original post and response posts make each discussion topic worth up to 35 points.

Requirements for image uploads are as follows:

Images must be sized correctly, approximately 500 pixels on the longest dimension, using image editing software.Each must be uploaded as single .jpg format image. It must be named appropriately as indicated in the assignment, Week#_Description.jpg (For example, Week2_Symmetrical.jpg).  All images must be shot on or after the class start date. Images must include original metadata in the .jpg file that reflects current shooting information. There should be no date stamps on the image display area. You must post only .jpg files. They need to be re-sampled to under 3MB or smaller. No PSD, TIF, DOC, Camera Raw, PDF, ZIP, PNG, or other file formats will be accepted. Images must be smaller than 3MB after resizing. Make sure your image is inserted properly. Use the insert picture icon located in the discussion response box. Don't forget to submit your assignment to the Dropbox!

Please note: You must enter your written responses directly into your post as text, and use the insert image icon or attach your .jpg to the post. Discussion posts with images linked on external sites or incorrectly posted files will not receive points.


Shooting Assignments

There are eight Shooting (Dropbox) Assignments in this course. They are due by 11:59 p.m. CT, Sunday of each week, except in Week 8, when your assignment is due by 11: 59 p.m. CT, Saturday. Assignments will be graded per the rubric provided in the Content area of D2L. Total possible points are 100 points each. Together, these are approximately 53% of your final grade. You will be graded on your ability to exhibit a comprehension of the issues and goals established for each assignment. Grades will be based on the application of design principles, creativity, effort, and craftsmanship. You must retain the original digital file to submit if I request it for assessment purposes.

Requirements for image uploads are as follows:

Images must be uploaded as single .jpg format images. Images Must be named appropriately as indicated in the assignment, Week#_Description.jpg (For example, Week2_Symmetrical.jpg) Images must be resized using image editing software, approximately 1000 pixels on the longest dimension.All images must be shot on or after the class start date.Images must include original metadata in the .jpg file that reflects current shooting information. The date stamps on the image should not be included. No PSD, TIF, Camera Raw, PDF, ZIP, PNG, or other file formats allowed. ONLY JPG file format is allowed. Images must be smaller than 3MB after resizing. Files that cannot be opened or are of the wrong size will not be graded. You must edit and choose your images prior to submission. Do not crop your images. Submit them as shot in the camera.

Grading criteria for the images is given as follows:

  • Composition: Photographs strongly demonstrate elements of compositional arrangement, balance, design principles, visual interest, and unity. All photographs clearly communicate nonverbal meaning and intent.
  • Content: Submissions show successful application of photography techniques, presenting concept and all assignment requirements. Submissions show intent, and demonstrate meaning to the viewer in a creative way. Visual impact, mood and/or emotion are used as effective aesthetic elements in all photographs. All requested files submitted to the assignment.
  • Format: All submitted files are named correctly. Images are resized properly. Images are properly adjusted, within the scope of the assignment.

Quizzes

There are eight quizzes (one in each week) in the course, worth 50 points each. Quizzes will open at 12:01 a.m. CT, Mondays and close by 11:59 p.m. CT, Sundays, except for Week 8, when the due date is 11:59 p.m. CT, Saturday. Each quiz consists of 20 multiple-choice questions that correspond to the required reading material covered during the week. Please select the most appropriate answer. You have 60 minutes and one attempt to complete each quiz. Quizzes are taken online in the D2L course environment. You should click the 'Save' button after each question. The correct answers will be released after the availability period has ended. You can review the quiz results at 12:01 a.m. CT on the day after the quiz closes. 



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Camera Work
Readings
  • Chapter 1: Camera
  • Image Submission Guidelines

Note: Please see the content area for more details.

Introduction Discussion

Introduce yourself to the class in the "Introduction" topic of our class discussion area. Include your location, profession, hobbies or interests, background, camera, and any other information that can help us get to know you.

Why are you interested in digital photography? If you would like, include a photo of yourself.

Discussion 1

Post one image from Shooting Assignment 1: Photographs demonstrating basic compositional techniques of horizontal, vertical, diagonal, and proportion (rules of the thirds).

Provide a statement that includes camera technical information as well as a short statement about the image you took.

Respond to at least two classmates’ original posts/photos, offering suggestions, asking clarifying questions, and stimulating dialogue related to the topic of the week.

Shooting Assignment 1

Before you begin the assignment, be sure to review the Welcome to Basic Photography video, Digital Photography video, Basic Composition Techniques video, and Image Resizing video.

In this assignment, you will shoot images using four basic composition techniques.

  1. Shot 1: Horizontal
  2. Shot 2: Vertical
  3. Shot 3: Diagonal
  4. Shot 4: Proportion (Rule of Thirds)

Name the images as follows:

  1. Yourname-Horizontal.jpg
  2. Yourname-Vertical.jpg
  3. Yourname-Diagonal.jpg
  4. Yourname-Proportion.jpg

I recommend that you shoot at least 10 of each shot and submit your best one for each shot.

You will submit all four images to the appropriate Dropbox folder. Read “Image Submission Guidelines” prior to submission.

Quiz 1

Quiz 1 consists of 20 multiple-choice questions. You will have 60 minutes and only one (1) attempt to complete them. Quiz 1 will be based on chapter 1. Answers of the quiz will be released on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 2.

Week 2: The Artistry of the Lens
Readings
  • Chapter 2: Lens

Note: Please see the content area for more details.

Discussion 2

Post one image from Shooting Assignment 2: Photographs demonstrating basic compositional techniques of symmetrical (formal balance), asymmetrical (informal balance), framing, pattern, and reflections

Respond with a statement that includes camera technical information as well as a short statement about the image you took.

Shooting Assignment 2

Submit five (5) photographs that illustrate the following basic composition techniques:

  1. Shot 1: Symmetrical (Formal Balance)
  2. Shot 2: Asymmetrical (Informal Balance)
  3. Shot 3: Framing
  4. Shot 4: Urban Patterns
  5. Shot 5: Reflection

Name the images as follows:

  1. Yourname-Symmetry.jpg
  2. Yourname-Asymmetrical.jpg
  3. Yourname-Framing.jpg
  4. Yourname-Pattern.jpg
  5. Yourname-Reflection.jpg

Submit all 5 images to the appropriate Dropbox folder. Read “Image Submission Guidelines” prior to submission.

Quiz 2

Quiz 2 consists of 20 multiple-choice questions. You will have 60 minutes and only one (1) attempt to complete them. Quiz 2 will be based on chapter 2. Answers of the quiz will be released on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 3.

Week 3: The Full Exposure
Readings
  • Chapter 3: Light and Exposure
  • Lecture on Exposure
  • Depth of Field Demystified
  • Field Guide for Exposure

Note: Please see the content area for more details.

Discussion 3

There are two parts to this discussion. Complete both parts in a single post.

Part 1: Write a paragraph or two (not to exceed 300 words) that demonstrates your understanding of exposure, exposure meters, and various metering situations.

Part 2: Post one image from Shooting Assignment 3: Photographs demonstrating basic camera techniques of stopped motion (no flash), blurred motion, panning, and depth of field. Respond with a statement that includes camera technical information as well as a short statement about the image you took.

Shooting Assignment 3

Submit eight (8) photographs that illustrate the following basic composition techniques:

  1. Shots 1 & 2: Stopped Action
  2. Shots 3 & 4: Blurred Action
  3. Shots 5 & 6: Panning Motion
  4. Shots 7 & 8: Depth of Field (DOF)

Name the images as follows:

  1. Yourname-stopped1.jpg
  2. Yourname-stopped2.jpg
  3. Yourname-blurred1.jpg
  4. Yourname-blurred2.jpg
  5. Yourname-panning1.jpg
  6. Yourname-panning2.jpg
  7. Yourname-DOF1.jpg
  8. Yourname-DOF2.jpg

Submit your 8 shots to the appropriate Dropbox folder. Read “Image Submission Guidelines” prior to submission.

Quiz 3

Quiz 3 consists of 20 multiple-choice questions. You will have 60 minutes and only one (1) attempt to complete them. Quiz 3 will be based on chapter 3. Answers of the quiz will be released on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 4.

Week 4: Exploring Place
Readings
  • Chapter 4: The Digital Darkroom
  • Chapter 5: Imaging Editing

Note: Please see the content area for more details.

Discussion 4

Post one image of your work from Shooting Assignment 4: Photographs demonstrating documentary techniques of small towns, farms, buildings, and landmarks. Complete both parts of this discussion in a single post.

Part 1: Research photographic work of a documentary photographer from the list provided. Describe his or her style and how they photographed the place. Discuss how his or her work informed your understanding of photographing the place.

  1. Walker Evans
  2. Helen Levitt
  3. Jill Freedman
  4. Robert Frank
  5. William Eggleston

Part 2: Respond with a statement that includes camera technical information as well as a short statement about the image you took.

Shooting Assignment 4

Submit photographs of four (4) different landmarks, public places, or buildings.

Name the images as follows:

  • Yourname-b-w1.jpg
  • Yourname-b-w2.jpg
  • Yourname-color1.jpg
  • Yourname-color2.jpg

These are documentary photographs demonstrating documentary techniques of small towns, farms, buildings, and landmarks.

Your documentary photographs can be taken in the area you are located.

Your 4 pictures should be of 4 different historic buildings. Remember all photographs are to be current and not old work.

Submit your four shots to the appropriate Dropbox folder: Two black-and-white images and two color images

Do not submit black-and-white and color images of the same building.

Read “Image Submission Guidelines” prior to submission.

Quiz 4

Quiz 4 consists of 20 multiple-choice questions. You will have 60 minutes and only one (1) attempt to complete them. Quiz 4 will be based on chapter 4. Answers of the quiz will be released on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 5.

Week 5: Compositional Considerations
Readings
  • Chapter 6: Printing and Display
  • Web Resources: Review two articles below from Photography Composition Library Articles
  • An Eye for Composition by Gary Stanley
  • Breaking all the Rules by Gloria Hopkins
  • Tips from the Pros

Note: Please see the content area for more details.

Discussion 5

Post two images from Shooting Assignment 5: Take several photos of your chosen subject using different camera angles, proximities, focus points, and lighting/white balance choices.

Respond with a statement that includes camera technical information as well as a short statement about the image you took.

Shooting Assignment 5

Choose a three-dimensional subject or an indoor or outdoor environment to photograph. Take several photos of your chosen subject using different camera angles, proximities, focus points, and lighting/white balance choices. Use a tripod when necessary. 

Your 4 pictures should be of the same subject. Approach the subject with a variety of angles, intentional focus and different lighting. You may choose to have some of the images in black and white, but if you do, you still must have a different approach or view on the image.

Name the images as follows:

  • Yourname-composition1.jpg
  • Yourname-composition2.jpg
  • Yourname-composition3.jpg
  • Yourname-composition4.jpg

Submit your four shots to the appropriate Dropbox folder: Four color or black-and-white images

Remember: Do not submit black-and-white and color versions of the same shot.

Read “Image Submission Guidelines” prior to submission.

Quiz 5

Quiz 5 consists of 20 multiple-choice questions. You will have 60 minutes and only one (1) attempt to complete them. Quiz 5 will be based on chapter 6. Answers of the quiz will be released on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 6.

Week 6: A New View
Readings
  • Chapter 7: Organizing and Storing
  • Chapter 8: Lighting
  • Week 6 Lecture on Abstraction
  • Week 6 Lecture on Selective Color
  • Read the article New Views

Research images taken by the following photographers using the links in the Content area or your favorite online search tool:

  • Alex Cearns
  • Uta Barth
  • Rinko Kawauchi

Note: Please see the content area for more details.

Discussion 6

Post two images from Shooting Assignment 5: Take several photos of your chosen subject using different camera angles, proximities, focus points, and lighting/white balance choices.

Respond with a statement that includes camera technical information as well as a short statement about the image you took.

Shooting Assignment 6

Produce and submit four (4) images of four different common objects, making them unrecognizable or different from how they appear.

Review the lecture on abstract photography before beginning.

Name the images as follows:

  1. Yourname-newview1.jpg
  2. Yourname-newview2.jpg
  3. Yourname-newview3.jpg
  4. Yourname-newview4.jpg

Submit your four shots to the appropriate Dropbox folder: Four color/black-and-white/selective color images.

Remember: Do not submit black-and-white and color versions of the same shot.

Read “Image Submission Guidelines” prior to submission.

Quiz 6

Quiz 6 consists of 20 multiple-choice questions. You will have 60 minutes and only one (1) attempt to complete them. Quiz 6 will be based on chapters 7 & 8. Answers of the quiz will be released on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 7.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Color Shifts and Low Light
Readings
  • Chapter 9: Seeing Like a Camera
  • Review the websites in the Content area

Note: Please see the content area for more details.

Discussion 7

Post one image from Shooting Assignment 7: Photographs that explore low light and night photography. Avoid using direct flash this week.

Respond with a statement that includes camera technical information as well as a short statement about the image you took.

Shooting Assignment 7

You can shoot anything at night you like in any way except for direct auto mode with flash.

If you use a flash, use "night portrait mode" or "rear-curtain sync" on the flash if you have this, and stabilize your camera. Avoid unintentional camera movement. Use a tripod.

Submit your four shots to the appropriate Dropbox folder.

  1. Shots 1 and 2: Black and White
  2. Shots 2 and 3: Color

Name the images as follows:

  1. Yourname-b-w1.jpg
  2. Yourname-b-w2.jpg
  3. Yourname-color1.jpg
  4. Yourname-color2.jpg
Read “Image Submission Guidelines” prior to submission.
Quiz 7

Quiz 7 consists of 20 multiple-choice questions. You will have 60 minutes and only one (1) attempt to complete them. Quiz 7 will be based on chapter 9. Answers of the quiz will be released on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 8.

Week 8: Strike a Pose
Readings
  • Chapter 10: History of Photography
  • Week 8 Lecture on Emotion

Note: Please see the content area for more details.

Discussion 8

Post one image from Shooting Assignment 8: Photographs that explore different types of portraits with direct light, direct light with fill light, open shade and shadow with strong emotional qualities.

Respond with a statement that includes camera technical information as well as a short statement about the image you took.

Shooting Assignment 8

For the final assignment, explore four (4) different types of portraits using one model. You will need to provide a model. Use only a single subject. You may create portrait, three-quarter length, or full-length images. This is not a group photograph. You will use the same model for all shots for comparison reasons. All photographs are to be taken outdoors if possible. Work with direct light, direct light with fill light, open shade, and shadow to create portraits with strong emotional qualities.

Name the images as follows:

  1. Yourname-Direct light.jpg
  2. Yourname-Direct Light with Fill.jpg
  3. Yourname-Open Shade.jpg
  4. Yourname-Portrait with Shadow.jpg

Note: If you have no sunshine this week, read below:

You will need to use a flood lamp or shop light mounted up high to simulate the sun. A clip-on reflector from a hardware store may be used in a pinch. Be sure to light the model at about 45 degrees and use at least a 100-watt bulb or stronger.

Submit your four shots to the appropriate Dropbox folder. Read “Image Submission Guidelines” prior to submission.

Quiz 8

Quiz 8 consists of 20 multiple-choice questions. You will have 60 minutes and only one (1) attempt to complete them. Quiz 8 will be based on chapter 10. Answers of the quiz will be released on 12:01 a.m. CT, Sunday of Week 8.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

Late discussion, assignments, and quizzes will not be accepted in this class.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


+

Request info