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Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

HIST 494: Senior Seminar In History

Course Description

The Senior Seminar in History is dedicated to the research and writing of a senior thesis. All participants are expected to apply the techniques of scholarship as generally accepted by the historical profession. The seminar is the culminating experience for graduation as a history major.

Completion with a grade of “C” or higher is required.


Assessment Testing
: In this course you will be required to take the History Assessment Test (HAT) and you may be randomly selected to participate in the completion of the ETS Proficiency Profile (ETSPP). The HAT is a test of content mastery in History developed by the Columbia College History faculty. It takes two hours. The ETSPP is a test of proficiency in areas covered in your general education and foundation courses. It takes forty minutes. The ETSPP is nationally standardized test taken by thousands of students in the US. Columbia College uses your results and the results of every Columbia College student taking both the HAT and the ETSPP to improve learning experiences in the curriculum. Your cooperation and honest effort contributes to the integrity and value of your education and are vital to the effectiveness of the Columbia College outcomes assessment program. If you are within reasonable distance of one of our Nationwide Campuses, you will be asked to schedule a proctor session at that campus and to take the tests in a proctored setting in Week 8.

Prerequisite: HIST 294; HIST 121; HIST 122; HIST 101 or HIST 111; HIST 102 or HIST 112; and nine hours of HIST electives at the 300- or 400-level



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Benjamin, Jules. (2013). A Student’s Guide to History (12 ed.). Bedford/St. Martin’s.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4576-2144-4]
    • Note: Readings/Assignments: refer to this syllabus under “Benjamin”
  • Furay, Conal and Salevouris. (2015). The Methods and Skills of History: A Practical Guide (4 ed.). Harlan Davidson.
    • [ISBN-978-1-118-74544-1]
    • Note: Readings/Assignments: refer to this syllabus under “Furay”
  • John Lewis Gaddis. (2002). The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.
    • [ISBN-978-0-19-517157-0]
    • Note: Readings/Assignments: refer to this syllabus under “Gaddis”
  • Howel, Martha and Prevenier, Walter. (2001). From Reliable Sources: An Introduction to Historical Methods (1st ed.). Cornell University Press.
    • [ISBN-978-0-8014-8560-2]
    • Note: Readings/Assignments: refer to this syllabus under “Prevenier”
  • Marius, Richard. (2012). A Short Guide to Writing about History (9th ed.). Longman, Inc.
    • [ISBN-978-0-321-95329-2]
    • Note: Readings/Assignments: refer to this syllabus under “Marius
  • Turabian, Kate. (2013). A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (8th ed.). University of Chicago .
    • [ISBN-978-0-226-81638-8]
    • Note: This text is not used for reading assignments, but is necessary to have for reference in accordance with the History Department guidelines for HIST 294 and 494.

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Based upon the Research Design complete in HIST 294, you will proceed to apply the techniques of research as generally accepted by the historical profession. After thoroughly examining primary and secondary sources on the selected topic, you will then write an original research paper, following the general format of bibliography, outline, note-taking, drafts, and a final documented research paper. Papers will be distributed to members of the online seminar and will be critiqued and defended.

Historical Research and Methods introduces the tools required to write and to teach history, including both the theories and the practical application of those theories with the tools to make the job possible. The course begins with an overview of what was covered in HIST 294 (Historiography), an introduction to research methods. It is followed with weeks devoted to techniques used by historians in the research, writing and teaching of history, and with a continual focus on the modern “philosophy of history” for a basic understanding of the discipline as it is practiced by historians today. Topics include the use of sources, writing techniques, statistical methods, and of course, the use of computers and the Internet in completing research.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of key events in U.S. and world history.
  2. Articulate a philosophy and theory of history that aligns with current historical research practices.
  3. Detect assumptions, bias and opinions in primary source materials.
  4. Produce an original thesis using the Chicago Style.
  5. Criticize the research methodology of a peer after reviewing a thesis draft.
  6. Defend the evidence and argument of a thesis.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 360-400 90-100%
B 320-359 80-89%
C 280-319 70-79%
D 240-279 60-69%
F 0-239 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Projects: Critical Review Essays (3) 50 12%
History and Resarch Methods Discussions 80 20%
Research Project: Methods 5 1%
Reserach Project: Annotated Bibliography 10 2%
Research Project: Note Cards 10 2%
Research Project: Outline 15 4%
Research Project: Rough Draft 60 15%
Research: Project Final Paper 130 32%
Research Project: Critical Reviews (4) 40 10%
Total 400 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introduction 0 Sunday
Discussions 10
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Research Project: Methods 5 Friday/Sunday
Discussions 10
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Research Project: Annotated Bibliography and Note Cards 20 Friday/Sunday
Discussions 10
Project 1: Historical Paper Reviews 10 Sunday
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Research Project: Outline 15 Friday/Sunday
Discussions 10
Project 2: Historian Review 30 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussions 10 Friday/Sunday
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussions 10 Friday/Sunday
Research Project: Rough Draft 60 Sunday
Project 3: Film Review 10
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Research Project: Critical Reviews of Rough Draft Papers 40 Wednesday
Discussions 10 Friday/Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Research Project: Final Papers 130 Tuesday
Discussions 10 Friday/Saturday
Total Points 400

Assignment Overview

History Discussion Postings and Replies

In this discussion forum, we will engage in the study of history. Each week, I will pose 1-3 questions about the week’s reading assignment in the Discussions area. You are required to answer each question posed with a thoughtful and documented response. In addition to the student’s initial post, all students are required to read all postings in this forum. Select at least two of your classmates’ posts per question and provide a substantial, thought-provoking response. Your follow up postings should further the conversation and/or provide constructive feedback. In addition, be sure to respond to all questions posed to you. It is vital that you read all of the postings in this forum. Each post for this class must have footnotes and a bibliography, with proper formatting.

Research Methods Postings and Replies

In this discussion forum, we will research and analyze the way historians have approached the components of researching and writing. We will look at various research techniques, evaluation methods for sources, how to appropriately and efficiently use libraries and online research guides. Additionally, we will discussion writing techniques, citation formats, required components of historical research, and the use of the research to the historical community and the public at large.

Projects

Over the span of this course, you are required to complete three projects that will utilize the course dropbox. The projects are designed to assist you in implementing the skills you acquire through your research, class discussions, and study. Each project will require you to critically review a document or artifact and write a 300-word, formal essay depicting your findings. Project 2 will actually require you to write two essays, so you will write a total of four essays for all three projects. Project 1 will require you to review an historical paper, Project 2 will require you to review two historians, and Project 3 will require you to review an historical film (of your choice). All of these essays must be written without the use of “I” in the paper.

Research Project

These are “formal” assignments which are all part of the final research paper. The discussions about and submissions of these assignments will take place in the Discussions area (with the exception of the Rough Draft, due in Week 6, which should be submitted to both the discussion and the Dropbox area and the Final Paper*, which will be submitted to the appropriate Dropbox). Please submit each assignment, according to its due date, in the correct discussions topic.

1) Updating the Research Design – first part of the writing project. Using your work from HIST 294, you will update your Annotated Bibliography assignment; create a Methods section, as well as, revise/polish your thesis and topic. This is an opportunity to update your topic, thesis, methods, and annotated bibliography, and should be used wisely. The Methods and Annotated Bibliography will be posted as separate assignments.
If you completed HIST 294 (or its equivalent) at another college/university and the format of your prospectus is different, this is not a problem. However it was formatted, the prospectus should always discuss the thesis, the methodology, and an annotated bibliography of primary and secondary sources. If your bibliography was not annotated, it needs to be for this exercise.

2) Note cards, Outline, and Rough Draft -- Preliminary writing artifacts, such as note cards and outlines, for the final paper will be reviewed and critiqued and evaluated throughout the course. We will also look at rough drafts/revisions as time allows. Each assignment will be submitted separately, and specific directions for completing each may be found in the Content area. The Rough Draft must be submitted to both the discussion link and the course Dropbox.

3) Final Paper* – based on the thesis developed, you will write a 5,000- word (approximately 20-25, double-spaced pages) Final Paper. In writing this paper, you must follow the components of the research you have completed. Your grade will be based on your adherence to your developed thesis, methods, outline and your rough draft. You will have an opportunity to defend your paper and the methods you chose in the discussions.

4) Critical Review of Groups Rough Draft Papers
– You will be assigned to critically review four (4) of your classmates’ Rough Draft Papers. All critical reviews should be posted as replies to the original post in either Week 6 or Week 7 discussion log. Be sure to evaluate whether or not your classmate followed the method and then consider how well he/she has set the stage to prove his thesis with his/her methodology. There is a Critical Review Guideline in the Content are you are to follow. These reviews will be due the Wednesday of Week 7 (could begin earlier if papers are submitted sooner).


Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Methods Intro, Ethics and the Chicago Style
Readings
• Overview and other readings for Week 1 found in the Content area
• Prevenier: pp. 1-42;
• Benjamin: Chapter 1 “The Subject of History and How to Use it”, 69-79 (Interpreting Sources), 98-101 (Preparing to Write), 109 (Plagiarism). Use Chapter 10 throughout the course for Chicago Style reference.
• Marius: Chapter 1 “Writing and History” and Chapter 2 “Thinking about History”
• Furay: Chapters 1 & 2. Be sure to read all the “writing capsules” in Furay chapters assigned throughout the course.
Assignments
• Research Project: Over the next two weeks, you will be updating the Annotated Bibliography and your research from HIST 294. Begin working on updating these now!
Introduction
Please introduce yourself to the rest of the class. Tell us about your job, what you like to do, your interest in history, etc. Be sure to also include your location. Please post your introduction postings to the correct discussion topic in the General Forum by midnight Sunday.
Discussions
·   Research Methods Discussion: Question 1:  Review of the Historiographical Process covered in HIST 294, (content area) specifically the “Seven Steps” of research planning.  Post answers to the question(s) posed and any follow ups by midnight Sunday.  Follow up postings are strongly recommended, yet optional for this week only.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Questions 2: Review of the ethics of the historian profession and the Chicago Manual of Style.  Post your answers to the activity and any questions about these topics by midnight Sunday.  Again, follow up postings are strongly recommended, but not required for this week only.
Week 2: Research
Readings
• Overview and other readings for Week 2 found in the Content area
• Prevenier: pp. 60-87
• Benjamin: Chapter 3 “Working with Different Types of Historical Evidence” and Chapter 7 “Conducting Research in History”
• Marius: Chapter 3 “Gathering Information”
• Furay: Chapter 7 “Libraries” and Chapter 10 “Evidence”
Research Project: Methods
This week, we will review research methods and evaluate the methods we have used to date and how they will be used in the completion of the Research Project.  In this post, briefly discuss your topic and thesis.  Then, post your Methods section from the research you completed in HIST 294.  Using the Critical Review Guide, available in the Content area, provide sustentative commentary on at least one other classmate’s updated Methods section.  Be sure to evaluate whether or not your classmate followed the method and then consider how well he/she has set the stage to prove his thesis with his/her methodology.  In addition to your original and follow up postings, be sure to read all postings and respond to all questions posed to you.  Post your updated Methods section by midnight Friday and your critic by midnight Sunday.
Discussions
·   History Discussion: Question 1: How do we know that something happened the way the historian claims that it did?  The answer is simple.  Find additional sources that are credible and that can corroborate his facts and then evaluate his deductions using critical methods.  We’ll practice this technique and discuss our findings in this topic.  Please post your examples and original analysis by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 1:  Using the categories studied in HIST 294 (see the Content area for review), discuss what a primary source is using an example not chosen by a previous classmate.  Be sure to consider different classes of primary sources (As we learned in HIST 294, these can be documents, artifacts, oral testimony, etc.)  Post your answer by midnight Friday and comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 2: Using one of the History Sourcebook Internet databases (links are available in the Week 2 Overview and Links area), select one primary source that deals with your research paper and briefly discuss its value to your research. If you cannot find a suitable source in one of these Internet databases, then look elsewhere on the Internet to find something suitable. In either case, provide the proper reference citations in the Chicago Style. Post your source and discussion by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday. 

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 3: With this topic, we will explore the methods used to find library sources, including journals and online databases.  Please follow the instructions provided in the Content area under the Week 2 Overview.   In addition to discussing your searching methods, discuss if your topic/thesis has been refined by this activity.  Post your original posting by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmate’s methods by midnight Sunday.
Week 3: Writing
Readings
• Overview and other readings for Week 3 found in the Content area
• Benjamin: Chapter 6 “Building a History Essay”, and Chapter 8 “Writing and Research Paper”
• Marius: Chapter 4 “Notes and Drafts” and review Chapter 1 “Writing and History”
• Furay: Chapter 5, Chapter 8, Chapters 12-13
Research Project: Annotated Bibliography and Note Cards
This week, we will review our updated bibliographies and study techniques of note-taking.  Briefly discuss your topic and thesis again.  Then, post your updated Annotated Bibliography for peer review.  At this point in researching, your bibliography should contain at least 12+ primary sources and at least 15+ secondary sources.  The reference cited should have at least one or two lines explaining how this source is being used in your research.  Then, using the examples provided in the Furay text, create at least three sample note cards for your project.  Post your sample note card examples.  Using the Critical Review Guide, available in the Content area, provide sustentative commentary on at least one other classmate’s updated Annotated Bibliography and Note Cards.  Be sure to evaluate whether or not your classmate followed the method and then consider how well he/she has set the stage to prove his thesis with his/her methodology.  In addition to your original and follow up postings, be sure to read all postings and respond to all questions posed to you.  Post your updated Annotated Bibliography and sample Note Cards by midnight Friday and your critic by midnight Sunday.
Discussions
·   Research Methods Discussion: Question 1:  On pages 9-23 (ed. 6), Marius discusses five points: a) sharp focus, b) clear arguments, c) build with evidence, d) be organized and objective, and e) write clearly and consider your audience.  Pick one of the five points and expand upon it in your posting.  You should pick a different point from one already posted until all five have been chosen.  Then, you may repeat.  There is an old adage concerning writing which says to remember that the “snake bites its tail,” meaning that you should conclude where you started.  Consider this adage in your comments as well.  Post your answer by midnight Friday and comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 2: What is the best method of taking notes and why?  Consider using note cards, computers, etc.  Why is it important to plan and organize your work?  Post your source and discussion by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 3: Look at the writer’s checklist in the Marius text (pp 97).  Pick one of these items and comment on it.  You should pick a different point from one already posted until all have been chosen.  Then, you may repeat.  Post your original posting by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmate’s methods by midnight Sunday.
Project 1: Historical Paper Reviews
Read “The Progressive Era and Race” paper found in the Furay text (pp 144-146) and complete the exercises for that chapter.  Then, using the essay format requirements outlined in the Content area, write a 300-word formal essay critiquing the historical paper.  (The specific answers to the chapter exercise do not need to be submitted, only the essay.)  Submit your essay to the correct folder in the Dropbox area by midnight Sunday.  No “I” used in these essays.
Week 4: Critical Thinking and Review
Readings
• Overview and other readings for Week 4 found in the Content area
• Benjamin: Chapter 5 “Writing Assignments” and review Chapter 7
• Marius: Chapter 5 “Voice and Style”
• Gaddis: pp 1-33
Research Project: Outline
As we review the outlines this week, you should also be working on your rough draft.  In your posting, briefly discuss your topic and thesis again.  Then, post your Outline. Using the Critical Review Guide, available in the Content area, provide sustentative commentary on at least one other classmate’s Outline.  Be sure to evaluate whether or not your classmate followed the method and then consider how well he/she has set the stage to prove his thesis with his/her methodology.  In addition to your original and follow up postings, be sure to read all postings and respond to all questions posed to you.  Post your Outline section by midnight Friday and your critic by midnight Sunday.
Discussions
·   Research Methods Discussion: Question 1:  Is the Holy Bible an historical document?  Use your critical thinking skills to provide objective evidence to support or reject this claim.  Post your answer by midnight Friday and comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 2: Read Appendix B and the book review in Marius (pp 194-200) and comment on 2-3 of the writer’s checklist items regarding this one book review.    Post your source and discussion by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday. 

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 3: Consider the following statement and determine whether the statement is biased or objective:  “The Civil War began as a constitutional struggle over states’ rights, not slavery.”  What can the historian do to evaluate this statement?  Can you imagine why topics like this make remaining objective very difficult?  For variety, here is another statement you can discuss in the same way (just pick one or the other): “He who surrenders freedom for security deserves neither.”  Consider the latter statement using examples from the past two centuries of American or world history.  Post your original posting by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmate’s methods by midnight Sunday.
Project 2: Historian Review

Read the following two selections from 19th century historians and critique their methods:

  1. Macauley: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/macauley-cromwell.html
  2. Turner: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1893turner.html

Then, using the essay format requirements outlined in the Content area, write a 300-word formal essay critiquing each historian (similar to the essays completed for HIST 294).  You should have two, 300-word essays that must be submitted separately.  Submit your essays to the correct folders in the Dropbox area by midnight Sunday.

Week 5: Scientific History and Historical Methods
Readings
• Overview and other readings for Week 5 found in the Content area
• Prevenier: pp.43-60, 119-127;
• Marius: Chapter 6 “Documenting Sources” and review Chapter 2
• Gaddis: Chapters 3-4 and pp 35-70;
• Furay: Chapters 10, 12 and 15, and Appendix B
Discussions
·   History Discussion: Question 1: Read Chapters 3 & 4 and review Chapters 1 & 2 in the Gaddis text.  What does Gaddis praise about Marc Bloch and E. Carr and why?  What did they think, and what does Gaddis think, about the scientific nature of history?  Please post your examples and original analysis by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
History Discussion: Question 2: Read Chapters 3 & 4 and review Chapters 1 & 2 in the Gaddis text.  Gaddis says the historian’s job is to “peel away” the mists confronting the “wanderer” pictured on the cover of his book, to understand the past (metaphor—“clear the mists”) and put yourself in the midst of past events.  How does he say we should do this?  How does he cite Collingwood, Braudel, and McNeill regarding the task of the historian?  Please post your examples and original analysis by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 1:  We completed one brief study on quantification in HIST 294.  This time, we will look at quantification using an example from 17th century Salem—based on the exercises you have completed in Furay for this week.  This discuss will permit us to discuss what you have learned from these exercises.  What do the numbers tell us about the sudden appearance of witches in Puritan New England?  What does this technique accomplish in helping us to understand this very alien way of thinking regarding supernatural causation?  What indeed do the numbers tell us about what really happened?  Along with this consider the value of “quantifying” historical data.  Post your answer by midnight Friday and comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 2: We’ve already seen how the Internet may be used in historical research.  Now we want to consider what other advantages may be provided by the use of such technology.  How do computers and the tools (software) associated with them provide a more scientific evaluation of historical data?  Along with this, consider the use of technology to preserve the record of the past.  Is this rally making it more objective?  Can machines do a better job than the historian?  An optional resource for reference is “Historians and Computers” by Dr. Jim Jones (West Chester University, 2004).  Post your source and discussion by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday. 
Week 6: Spreading the Word – Teaching, Writing, and Visual Representation
Readings
• Overview and other readings for Week 6 found in the Content area
• Prevenier: pp. 88-143
• Benjamin: pp. 52-60
• Gaddis: Chapter 5, pp. 71-89
• Furay: Chapters 9 and 14
Discussions
·   Research Methods Discussion: Question 1: We know that historians usually are biased even if they do their best to remain objective.  Many times, however, “non-fiction” is far from being objective and may indeed be blatant propaganda (beware of what you see on the History Channel!)  One example of a propaganda film is the Nazi film “Triumph of the Will.”  Research this film.  While researching, you should locate similar examples.  Provide an example of a biased documentary that was intended to present historical fact and briefly discuss it.  Remember that “the media is the message” and it is indeed possible to control what people believe about themselves and their past even in societies that are NOT totalitarian.  Post your original answer by midnight Friday and comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 2: Does historical literature add to our understanding of historical situations and cause/effect relationships?  Imagination is no replacement for fact, but the writer can indeed present situations which can be avenues for research (every once and a while we find fiction becoming fact).  The writer of historical fiction begins with the known facts and fills in the holes with imagination—with reasonable deduction.  He also “paints a picture” of a world long gone, which is important for us to have a good connection with the past.  Many popular historians write in a similar manner and catch the attention of the “populace.”  History writing doesn’t have to be dry, and in fact, it should not be.  Comment here on the importance of historical fiction, pros and cons.  Give examples.  Post your original answer by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 3: How history is presented in the public is often the history they know and believe.  It becomes a part of folklore and tradition.  The ancient Romans (Livy) put the importance of tradition thus: “quad simper quad ubique quad ad omnibus creditus est,” which means “that which always, everywhere, and by everyone is believed.”  That is why when the “media is the message” that message must be reasonably accurate and objective.  There have been many books on the subject of Hollywood and history; perhaps you have seen one of them?  What is your opinion about the portrayal of history in the media?  Consider theatrical films like the one you reviewed for the Project 3: Film Review assignment.  Comment here on the significance of historical films to the popular conception of history.  Provide examples.  Post your original posting by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmate’s methods by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 4: The old adage of “those you can, do; those who can’t, teach” really doesn’t apply to the teaching of history.  A scientist may only be an experimenter, and may never teach or write.  While an historian makes his living with his writing, and teaches with his writing even if he never gets in front of a classroom.  Teaching is at the core of the historical profession, yet like in any discipline, what one knows is one thing and his ability to impart this knowledge to another is something else.  In your college careers you have undoubtedly witnessed both good and bad teaching practices in your history courses.  Discuss them in this topic.  What made the good practices good?  How could the bad practices have been improved?  Were there learning/teaching styles that played a positive or negative role in your learning?  Post your original posting by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmate’s methods by midnight Sunday.  
Research Project: Rough Draft
This week we will turn in rough drafts. Remember that your complete Rough Draft must be placed in the discussions area AND the Dropbox for your paper to be graded and to receive comments. Your rough draft must be a complete version of your paper.  In your discussion post, briefly discuss your topic and thesis again. Then, post your Rough Draft. In addition to your original and follow up postings, be sure to read all postings and respond to all questions posed to you. Post your Rough Draft by midnight Sunday and your critic by Week 7 Wednesday.
Project 3: Film Review
This time your task is to watch an historical theatrical movie (ANY movie with an historical theme).  Then, using the essay format requirements outlined in the Content area, write a 300-word critical essay discussing the approach the film’s creative team took regarding the depiction of historical events.  Was it accurate?  Was it accurate in key points of historical details?  Did it appear to be consistent with the lifestyle of the people of the time depicted or was it anachronistic?  Use the form in Furay (p 166) for guidance.  Submit your essay to the correct folder in the Dropbox area by midnight Sunday.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Final Thoughts on Causation
Readings
• Overview and other readings for Week 7 found in the Content area
• Prevenier: pp. 127-143
• Marius: Appendix A
• Gaddis: Chapters 6-7, pp 91-128
• Furay: Chapters 3-4
Research Project: Critical Reviews of Rough Draft Papers
Using the Critical Review Guide, available in the Content area, provide substantive commentary on four of other classmate’s Rough Draft. (Your group members)  Be sure to evaluate whether or not your classmate followed the method and then consider how well he/she has set the stage to prove his thesis with his/her methodology.  All critical reviews should be posted as replies to the original post.  Be sure to evaluate whether or not your classmate followed the method and then consider how well he/she has set the stage to prove his thesis with his/her methodology.  In addition to your original and follow up postings, be sure to read all postings and respond to all questions posed to you. 
Discussions
·   History Discussion: Question 1: What are Gaddis’ thoughts on causation?  In HIST 294 we talked about categorizing causes into “Idealist” or “Naturalist” schemes based on the “forces” behind the causes (human free will or environmental factors).  Gaddis looks at causes differently.  What, for example, are “immediate causes” and what other types of categorizations does he consider?  Please post your examples and original analysis by midnight Friday.  Comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.

·  
Research Methods Discussion: Question 1:  Pick one historian known to you and discuss his theories regarding historical causation (someone other than Gaddis obviously).  Everyone should pick a different historian and focus on the 19th-21st centuries!  Post your answer by midnight Friday and comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Sunday.
Week 8: Your future in history and the Final Project
Readings
• Overview and other readings for Week 8 found in the Content area
• Prevenier: pp. 143-150
Research Project: Final Papers
Post your Final Paper to the dropbox by midnight Tuesday.
Discussions
·   Research Methods Discussion: Question 1:  Is history dead?  Is there a future in history?  Can we really ever understand anything about the past?  It’s time once again for you to give considered opinions based on what you have learned!  This question was asked back in HIST 294, but now that we have completed our journey, do you have a new perspective on postmodern and modern views related to the ability to obtain knowledge of the past?  Post your answer by midnight Friday and comment on at least one other classmates’ posting by midnight Saturday.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted. Late assignments will only be accepted if extenuating circumstances beyond your control exist.  I must be notified prior to the due date of the assignment if it will be late.  A grade penalty may apply.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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