Skip to main content

Search Bar Icon Close Menu

Online classes

Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

HIST 348: World War II

Course Description

Analysis of the causes and consequences of the Second World War from a transnational perspective. This course examines the major events of the armed conflict from 1939 to 1945 while featuring the remembrances of combatants and non-combatants in Europe and Asia. The impact of "total war" on modernity is considered, as is the geopolitical realignment of the post-war world.

Prerequisite: HIST 102 or HIST 112

Proctored Exams: Midterm and Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Williamson Murray and Allan Millett . (2000). A War to be Won: Fighting the Second World War.The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    • [ISBN-978-0-674-00680-5]
  • Coetzee, Franz and Marilyn Shevin-Coetzee. (2011). The World in Flames: A World War II Sourcebook. Oxford University Press.
    • [ISBN-978-0-19-517422-7]
  • Bell, P.M.H. (2012). Twelve Turning Points of the Second World War. Yale University Press.
    • [ISBN-978-0-300-18770-0]
  • Rampolla, Mary Lynn. (2016). A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (8th). Bedford/St. Martin’s.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4576-9088-4]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

World War II was the defining event of the 20th Century and shaped the world forever. This course examines the causes, events, and consequences of the Second World War from a global perspective. You will study the major diplomatic, political, and military objectives and campaigns of the nations involved; examine the war from the perspective of the leaders as well as the individual combatants and civilians. You will assess the strengths and weakness of each belligerent, the contribution of each to the war effort, the impact of the war on American society and culture, and the political alignment of the post-war world. Additionally, you will examine the historiography of the war by writing a paper analyzing and discussing a subject of your own choosing using primary and secondary sources.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe the conditions and events in Europe and Asia that led to the Second World War.
  2. Analyze the comparative advantages of the Grand Alliance and the Axis Powers.
  3. Analyze the influence of World War II on decolonization in the 20th Century.
  4. Explain the effects of “total war” on civil society.
  5. Evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, and trends in the historiography of World War II.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Weekly Discussions (24) 240 24%
Writing Quiz 10 1%
Midterm Exam 250 25%
Scholarship Paper 250 25%
Final Exam 250 25%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion -- Wednesday
Discussion 1: Essential Questions 10 Friday/Sunday
Discussion 2: Online Research 10
Discussion 3: Roundtable Discussion 10
Writing Quiz 10 Sunday
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4: Essential Questions 10 Friday/Sunday
Discussion 5: Online Research 10
Discussion 6: Roundtable Discussion 10
Scholarship Paper: Topic Submission -- Sunday
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7: Essential Questions 10 Friday/Sunday
Discussion 8: Online Research 10
Discussion 9: Roundtable Discussion 10
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 10: Essential Questions 10 Friday/Sunday
Discussion 11: Online Research 10
Discussion 12: Roundtable Discussion 10
Midterm Exam 250 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13: Essential Questions 10 Friday/Sunday
Discussion 14: Online Research 10
Discussion 15: Roundtable Discussion 10
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 16: Essential Questions 10 Friday/Sunday
Discussion 17: Online Research 10
Discussion 18: Roundtable Discussion 10
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 19: Essential Questions 10 Friday/Sunday
Discussion 20: Online Research 10
Discussion 21: Roundtable Discussion 10
Scholarship Paper 250 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 22: Essential Questions 10 Friday/Saturday
Discussion 23: Online Research 10
Discussion 24: Roundtable Discussion 10
Final Exam 250 Saturday
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Besides the Introduction Discussion, there are Weekly discussion posts, separated into three discussion topics based on the type of discussion.  The discussion categories are:

  • Essential Questions
  • Online Research
  • Roundtable

Participation in all weekly discussions will improve your performance in the exams and improve your overall understanding of the concepts covered in this course. Exam questions will be based on the topics discussed in the Essential Questions and Roundtable Discussions, as well as the topics identified in the Online Research Discussions.

Chicago Style should be used for all writing assignments and you should provide citations as necessary. There is no maximum word limit for discussion posts or response comments.

You are expected to post your initial answers, read all of the instructor’s and classmates’ posts each week, and interact with at least one other student in each discussion thread. You are expected to contribute to the weekly discussion with original observations and responses. Simply agreeing with or rephrasing the statements of other students is not acceptable. You have until Friday, 11:59 pm CT to post initial answers to each topic and until Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT to post response comments except in Week 8 when the due date for response comments is Saturday, 11:59 pm CT.

Note: There is a non-graded Introduction Discussion to be completed by Wednesday, 11:59 pm CT of Week 1.

It is strongly advised that you read the weekly materials and make your Initial Discussion Posts early each week. This will help facilitate discussion and help you avoid making poor posts at the last minute.  The key to discussions is quality, not quantity: “last-day/last-minute” postings do not receive maximum points.

A suggested schedule for initial answers is:

  • Online Research: Tuesday, 11:59 pm CT.
  • Essential Questions: Wednesday, 11:59 pm CT.
  • Roundtable: Thursday, 11:59 pm CT.

Discussion Categories Explained

Essential Question(s)

You will answer each of the given questions using materials from the reading assignments and the Online Research topics. You may also include information from other sources but the course textbooks should be the primary source of your answers and you should identify any outside sources used. Support your arguments with information from these sources and analyze and comment on the answers from at least one of your classmates. ­Answers must be your original work and stated in your own words. Responses cut and pasted from the textbook or other sources are not acceptable.

Online Research

Using a search engine of your choice, search the web for information on two of the given topics. Wikipedia and other encyclopedic sources are NOT acceptable academic sources. ­ Describe the information on each topic that you have found on each site, identify the sponsor of the site, analyze its credibility (based on the guidelines in Rampolla), and discuss how the information on the site contributed to your understanding of each topic. ­You may choose any two topics you wish but try to avoid examining a topic from a site previously submitted by anyone else in the class.

The objective of this discussion is to identify as many credible research sources on each topic as possible. It is extremely important that you read the information posted by your classmates on all the topics in order to gain a fuller understanding of the significance of these topics. Comment on at least one site found by one of your classmates.

Roundtable Discussion

You will discuss one or more topics covering broader aspects of events, key leaders, actions, and decisions based on the reading assignments, online research. Answer each of the given questions using materials from the reading assignments and the Online Research topics. You may also include information from other sources but the course textbooks should be the primary source of your answers and you should identify any outside sources used.  Answers must be your original work and stated in your own words.  Responses cut and pasted from the textbook or other sources are not acceptable.


Writing Quiz

The Writing Quiz is intended for you to demonstrate your familiarity with the various aspects of writing a research paper as well as the Chicago Style of source documentation. The quiz will require you to define plagiarism, describe a thesis statement, explain the difference between a primary and a secondary source, and submit examples of footnotes and corresponding bibliographic entries in the Chicago style. It is an open book quiz with 20 questions and no time limit. You may use the Rampolla text.

The Writing Quiz is to be completed by Sunday, 11:59 pm CT of Week 1.


Scholarship Paper

You are required to write one Scholarship Paper in the course. The paper requires you to critically analyze primary resources and to research related secondary sources. The intent of this paper is to provide the opportunity to develop research and writing skills as well as synthesize knowledge about an important subject, discuss matters of fact and tell their stories with skill. Papers or other work previously submitted in other courses will not be accepted. You may choose any topic related to World War II and investigate it in detail.

To earn the maximum points, you must:

  • Consider an issue relevant to the course.
  • Construct a thesis statement.
  • Identify at least six examples of primary sources (letters, diaries, publications, etc.) related to the issue to support your thesis.
  • Consult additional secondary sources that help develop the thesis.
  • Incorporate an introduction, body, and conclusion.
  • Elaborate major points with a degree of specificity.
  • Clarify premises using coherent diction.
  • Avoid spelling errors, improper grammar, flawed punctuation, and awkward language.
  • Include at least 10 pages but no more than 15 pages of fully typed text, using one-inch margins, double-spaced, 12 point font, approximately 250 words per page.
  • Include a cover page and a bibliography. (These do not count towards the requirement for 10 pages of typewritten work.)
  • Use the Chicago Style documentation style guide correctly. (One of the class texts is Rampolla’s A Pocket Guide to Writing in History, which you should consult extensively.)
  • Use the Chicago Style numerical footnote/bibliography model described in Rampolla, not the abbreviated, parenthetical model with citations embedded in the text.

The course schedule for this paper is:

  • Topics must be submitted for approval to the appropriate Dropbox folder by Sunday, 11:59 pm CT of Week 2.
  • Submit your paper to the appropriate Dropbox folder by Sunday, 11:59 pm CT of Week 7.
  • Post a one page summary of your paper to Discussion 23 in the discussion area of Week 8 by Thursday, 11:59 pm CT and comment on the work of at least one other student.

Exams

There are two exams in the course, a Midterm and a Final. The Midterm and Final exams are proctored, and can be found in the Quizzes area of the course. Proctor information should be submitted to the Dropbox by the end of Week 2.

There are two (2) sections in each exam. The first section consists of 50 multiple choice questions covering major people, places, and events of the war. The multiple choice questions are auto-graded. The second section consists of essay questions requiring analysis and discussion of major aspects of the conflict. You must answer 4 out of 5 essays. The essay questions are graded by the instructor.  Please remember that after submitting your exam, the grade you see is only based on the multiple-choice section, not the entire exam.  Your score will be updated once the essays have been graded.

The Midterm Exam covers the materials in Weeks 1-4. The exam opens on Tuesday at 12:01 am CT, and is due on Sunday by 11:59 pm CT of Week 4. The Final Exam covers the materials in Weeks 5-8. The exam opens on Tuesday at 12:01 am CT, and is due on Saturday by 11:59 pm CT of week 8. You will have two (2) hours to complete each exam, and are allowed one (1) attempt only. No textbooks or class notes are allowed while taking the exams.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: The Path to War
Readings

1. Murray & Millett:

  • Preface
  • Chapter 1 – Origins of a Catastrophe
  • Chapter 2 – The Revolution in Military Operations, 1919-1939
  • Chapter 3 – German Designs, 1939-1940
  • Chapter 7 – The Origins of the Asia-Pacific War, 1919-1941
  • Epilogue (You will be required to evaluate the conclusions of the authors at the end of the course based on the readings throughout the course.)

2. Bell:

  • Introduction

3. Coetzee and Coetzee:

  • Chapter 1
    • Seeds of Turmoil p. 4
    • Japan's Outlook p. 16
    • Statement at Lushan p. 18
    • Rape of Nanking p. 20
    • Hossbach Memorandum p. 22
    • Appeasement p. 25
    • France Goes to War p. 30
  • Chapter 2
    • Soviet-Finnish War p. 36
    • Rethinking Armored Warfare p. 38
  • Chapter 3
    • Warning Signs from Japan p. 68
    • Japan's Decision for War p. 70
    • Avenging Western Imperialism p. 72
    • Plan Dog p. 78
    • Forging Allied Strategy p. 80
    • Allied Grand Strategy 83
  • Chapter 9
    • The Four Freedoms p. 270
    • The Atlantic Charter p. 271
    • Japan and Greater East Asia p. 275
Introduction Discussion

Tell the class something about yourself and any special interests you have in the study of history.

Discussion 1: Essential Questions

Respond to the following questions.

  • What were the conditions and events that led to war in Europe? Include in your answer the objectives, personalities, and events that contributed to Germany's expansionist moves in Europe.
  • What were the conditions and events that led to war in the Pacific? Include in your answer the objectives, personalities, and events that contributed to Japan's expansionist moves in the Pacific.
Discussion 2: Online Research

Research on any two topics from the list given below and write your response.

  • Treaty of Versailles
  • Washington Naval Conference of 1921
  • The Neutrality Acts
  • Benito Mussolini
  • Neville Chamberlain
  • Munich Conference of 1938
  • Anschluss
  • German Invasion of Poland
  • Heinz Guderian
  • Nazi-Soviet Pact
  • Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere
  • Japanese Invasion of Manchuria
  • Sino-Japanese War
  • Destroyers for Bases Deal
  • Atlantic Charter
  • Lend Lease
Discussion 3: Roundtable Discussion
  • Do you believe that the events leading to the start of hostilities were the result of the outcomes of the Great War or did the actions of the major nations in the 1930s reflect long-standing political, economic, cultural, psychological and other factors that shaped their behavior?
  • Analyze the actions of the major Axis Powers (Germany and Japan) and Allied Powers (Great Britain, China, the USSR, and the United States) as they approached these events.
  • Tell the class what you think and support your position based on the texts, online research, and primary source documents.
Writing Quiz

The quiz is an open book quiz with 20 questions that will require you to define plagiarism, describe a thesis statement, explain the difference between a primary and a secondary source, and submit examples of footnotes and corresponding bibliographic entries in the Chicago style. It has no time limit. You may use the Rampolla text. The Writing Quiz is to be completed by Sunday, 11:59 pm CT.

Week 2: Europe at War
Readings

1. Murray & Millett:

  • Chapter 4 – Germany Triumphant, 1940.
  • Chapter 5 – Diversions in the Mediterranean and Balkans, 1940-1941.
  • Chapter 6 – Barbarossa, 1941.

2. Bell

  • Chapter 1 – Hitler’s Triumph: The Collapse of France, May-June 1940.
  • Chapter 2 – ‘Finest Hour’: The Battle of Britain, July-September 1940.
  • Chapter 3 – Operation Barbarossa: The German Attack on the Soviet Union, 1941. 

3. Coetzee and Coetzee:

  • Chapter 2
    • Only Movement Brings Victory" Blitzkrieg p. 32
    • France's Collapse p. 42
    • Strange Defeat p. 46
    • A Certain Eventuality 49
    • De Gaulle's Appeal to France p. 52
    • French Collaboration p. 53
    • Occupied Poland p. 54
    • Air Raid on Southampton p. 56
    • London Is Burning p. 58
  • Chapter 3
    • The Widening War p. 61
    • Desert War p. 87
    • Survival in North Africa p. 89
    • Germany Strikes East p. 91
    • "The Criminal Orders" p. 94
    • Saving Moscow p. 96
    • Combat on the Russian Front p. 98
    • Hitler's Obstinance p. 100
  • Chapter 4
    • Mobilizing for War p. 102
    • Arsenal of Democracy p. 105
    • Factories on Rails p. 110
    • Producing for Victory 112
    • Ford's Willow Run p. 114
  • Chapter 6
    • Siege of Leningrad p. 190
    • Panzer Warfare in the East p. 192
    • Soviet Tactical Doctrine p. 194
  • Chapter 9
    • The Nazi New Order p. 268
    • Revival of Russian Orthodoxy p. 285
  • Chapter 10
    • The Inhumanity of Man: The Holocaust p. 308
    • Atrocities in Karmenets-Podolsky p. 319
    • The Youngest Victims p. 322
    • Wannsee Conference p. 324
    • A Polish Witness to Massacre p. 327
    • The Warsaw Ghetto p. 332
    • Himmler and the final Solution p. 337
Discussion 4: Essential Questions

Respond to the following questions.

  • What factors (on both sides) enabled the Germans to conquer France so quickly in May-June 1940?
  • Why did Germany become involved in Africa and the Balkans? Did they achieve their objectives?
  • Why did Hitler decide to invade the USSR?
Discussion 5: Online Research

Research any two topics from the list given below and write your response.

  • The “Final Solution”
  • Einsatzgruppen
  • Reinhard Heydrich
  • Erwin Rommel
  • Battle of Dunkirk
  • Operation Sea Lion
  • Battle of Britain
  • Hermann Goering
  • Afrika Korps
  • Stalin's Purges
  • Operation Barbarossa
Discussion 6: Roundtable Discussion

Using materials from the readings in both textbooks as well as your online research, answer the following questions:

  • How did German actions and conduct affect the civilian populations and military operations on the Eastern Front?
  • How did Stalin's policies in the 1930's help and hurt the Soviet Union's ability to resist the German invasion?
  • Murray and Millett say that Hitler's decision to declare war on the US "one of the worst mistakes he made." Why do they believe that? Do you agree?
Scholarship Paper: Topic Submission

Submit your Proposed Scholarship Paper Topic to the appropriate Dropbox folder by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Fighting Back in the Pacific and the Development of an Allied Grand Strategy
Readings

1. Murray & Millett:

  • Chapters : 8 & 9

2. Bell:

  • Chapters: 4 & 5

3. Coetzee and Coetzee

  • Chapter 3
    • Yamamoto's Strategy p. 75
    • Attack on Pearl Harbor p. 76
  • Chapter 5
    • The Tide Turns: June-December 1942 p. 135
    • Admiral Ugaki Reflects on Midway p. 151
    • The Strain of Jungle Warfare p. 153
    • Winning the Solomons p. 156
    • Why Japan Lost Guadalcanal p. 157
  • Chapter 7
    • The Asian Theater p. 204
    • Bataan Death March p. 207
    • "Vinegar Joe" and China p. 209
    • The British Army in Burma p. p. 212
    • Japanese Operations in Burma p. 216
    • Marxism and Burmese Resistance p. 218
    • The Indian Situation p. 221
  • Chapter 8
    • The War at Home in America p. 237
    • To Undo a Mistake p. 243
    • The Internment of German-Americans p. 246
  • Chapter 9
    • The Culture and Psychology of War p. 264
    • The Gl's Perspective p. 272
    • The Anthropology of Japanese Conduct p. 277
    • The New Imperatives of Education p. 293
    • Radio on the Home Front p. 296
    • Film and Propaganda p. 298
    • War Bonds and Mass Persuasion p. 303
Discussion 7: Essential Questions

Respond to the following questions.

  • What was the Allied Grand Strategy for defeating Japan and what were the practical difficulties in implementing this strategy?
  • What was the relationship between FDR, Chaing Kai Shek, and Joseph Stillwell and how did their relationship affect the China Campaign?
  • What factors made Pacific operations different from operations in Europe and did the Germany First strategy affect Pacific operations?
Discussion 8: Online Research

Research any two topics from the list given below and write your response.

  • Isoroku Yamamoto
  • Joseph Stillwell
  • Executive Order 9066
  • Chester W. Nimitz
  • Bataan Death March
  • Battle of the Coral Sea
  • Battle of Midway
  • Guadalcanal
  • Merrill's Marauders
  • Burma Road
  • "The Hump"
Discussion 9: Roundtable Discussion

Using materials from the readings in both textbooks as well as your online research, discuss the following questions:

  • How did the onset of war affect the American Home Front?
  • What were MacArthur's strengths and weaknesses as a commander? Was he an effective leader during the battle of the Philippines? Why was he not given the overall command of operations in the Pacific?
  • How effective were Allied operations in the Pacific in 1942-43? What were the relative strengths and weaknesses of each side at the beginning of the war and how did the US and its allies overcome their weaknesses?
Week 4: The Allied Fight for Survival in Europe
Readings

1. Murray & Millett:

  • Chapter 10 – The Battle of the Atlantic, 1939-1943.
  • Chapter 11 – The Year of Decision for Germany, 1942.

2. Bell:

  • Chapter 6 – The Battle of Stalingrad, July 1942 – February 1943.
  • Chapter 7 – Convoys and Wolfpacks: Decision in the Atlantic, March – May 1943.

3. Coetzee and Coetzee:

  • Chapter 5
    • The Mood in America p. 139
    • Rommel Reflects on the Desert War p. 141
    • Breakthrough at EI Alamein p. 143
    • Eisenhower Reflects on Operation Torch p. 146
    • Stalingrad: The Rats' War p. 149
  • Chapter 6
    • U-Boat Peril p. 174
    • Germany's U-Boat Strategy p. 177
    • Battle of Kursk p. 196
Discussion 10: Essential Questions

Respond to the following questions.

  • What was the significance of the Battle of the Atlantic? How close did the US come to going to war with Germany over incidents in the Atlantic before the country formally entered the war?
  • What factors contributed to the Allied success and the German defeat in the Battle of the Atlantic?
  • How did the battles of Stalingrad and Kursk affect the war on the Eastern front?
  • Why did FDR overrule his generals and commit US forces to the campaign in North Africa in November 1942? What were the major factors that contributed to the Allied victory in North Africa?
Discussion 11: Online Research

Research any two topics from the list given below and write your response.

  • German Wolfpacks
  • Karl Donitz
  • Enigma machine
  • Battle of Stalingrad
  • Battle of Kursk
  • Bernard Montgomery
  • Battle of El Alamein
  • Operation Torch
  • Kasserine Pass
  • Casablanca Conference
  • Unconditional Surrender
  • Second Front
  • Operation Husky
Discussion 12: Roundtable Discussion

Using materials from the readings in both textbooks as well as your online research, answer the following questions:

  • The German invasion of the Soviet Union was one of the largest military encounters of all time. How did the leadership of Hitler and Stalin affect the outcome?
  • Were Allied operations in North Africa and Sicily critical to the outcome of the war? If so, why? If not, why not?
Midterm Exam

The Midterm Exam covers course material from Weeks 1 - 4. It is broken down into 2 sections. Section 1 contains 50 multiple choice questions covering major people, place, and events of the war. Section 2 requires you to answer 4 of 5 essay questions requiring analysis and discussion of some of the major aspects of the conflict. You will have 2 hours to complete this closed book, no note, proctored exam. The exam opens at 12:01 am CT Tuesday, and must be complete by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT.

Week 5: Battles in the Air and on the Sea
Readings

1. Murray & Millett:

  • Chapter 12 – The Combined Bomber Offensive, 1941-1945.
  • Chapter 13 – The Destruction of Japanese Naval Power, 1943-1944.

2. Bell:

  • Chapter 8 – “The Proper Application of Overwhelming Force”: The Battle of the Factories.

3. Coetzee and Coetzee:

  • Chapter 6
    • The European Theater p. 159
    • Bombing Ploesti p. 164
    • Flying a B-17 p. 167
    • Area Bombing p. 169
    • Massacre by Bombing p. 170
  • Chapter 9
    • Soldiers Under Stress p. 279
    • Civilians Under Stress p. 281
    • Religion in the Skies p. 284
Discussion 13: Essential Questions

Respond to the following questions.

  • What were the underlying assumptions and beliefs that inspired the strategic bombing campaign?
  • What were the differences between US and British bombing tactics? What were the strengths and weaknesses of each?
  • What was the US strategy for the Pacific Campaign against Japan?
  • Why did MacArthur want to attack through the Philippines? How did the Japanese respond to the US advances?
Discussion 14: Online Research

Research any two topics from the list given below and write your response.

  • Arthur Harris
  • Erhard Milch
  • B-17 Flying Fortress
  • P-51 Mustang
  • Bombing of Berlin
  • "Big Week" Bombing Campaign
  • German V-weapons
  • Bombing of Dresden
  • Ernest J. King
  • Invasion of Tarawa
  • Invasion of Saipan
  • The “Great Marianas Turkey Shoot”
  • Battle of Leyte Gulf
  • B-29 Super Fortress
  • Henry "Hap" Arnold
Discussion 15: Roundtable Discussion

Using materials from the readings in both textbooks as well as your online research, answer the following questions:

  • How effective was the use of air power against Germany? (Be sure to discuss the total use of air power, not just the strategic bombing campaign.)
  • What lessons did the US learn from their experiences fighting the Japanese on Tarawa, Saipan, Guam, and Tinian?
Week 6: The Defeat of the Third Reich
Readings

1. Murray & Millett:

  • Chapter 14 – The Killing Time, 1943-1944.
  • Chapter 15 – The Invasion of France, 1944.
  • Chapter 16 – The End in Europe, 1944-1945.

2. Bell:

  • Chapter 9 – The Teheran Conference, 28 November-1 December 1943: Turning Point for the Grand Alliance.
  • Chapter 10 – D-Day and the Battle of Normandy, June-July 1944.
  • Chapter 11 – ‘A Fateful Conference’: Yalta, 4-11 February 1945.

3. Coetzee and Coetzee:

  • Chapter 6
    • The Fall of Mussolini p. 179
    • The Polish Resistance p. 182
    • Greece at War p. 184
    • Yugoslavia's Partisans p. 187
    • Eisenhower and Overlord p. 198
    • D-Day p. 200
    • Ernie Pyle's War p. 201
  • Chapter 8
    • The Rabbis March on Washington p. 241
  • Chapter 10
    • Defining Genocide p. 312
    • Lidice p. 330
    • Von Moltke's Thoughts on Resistance p. 340
    • Treblinka p. 344
  • Chapter 11
    • Liberating the Death Camps p. 351
    • The German Problem p. 355
Discussion 16: Essential Questions

Respond to the following questions.

  • What were the strategic objectives of the Italian campaign? Did it accomplish those objectives?
  • What factors contributed to the Allied victory in Normandy? Why were the Germans unable to defeat the invasion?
  • What were Hitler's objectives in launching the Ardennes offensive? How did that battle affect the outcome of the war?
  • How did the Soviet's military successes in early 1945 affect the Yalta conference?
Discussion 17: Online Research

Research any two topics from the list given below and write your response.

  • Teheran Conference
  • Mark W. Clark
  • Anzio
  • Operation Valkyrie
  • Klaus von Stauffenberg
  • Operation Overlord
  • Omar Bradley
  • George Patton
  • Operation Market Garden
  • Battle of the Bulge
  • Yalta Conference
  • Georgi Zhukov
Discussion 18: Roundtable Discussion

Using materials from the readings in both textbooks as well as your online research, answer the following questions:

  • How did the activities of the resistance and the partisans in German-occupied territory contribute to the defeat of Germany?
  • Roosevelt and Churchill chose to not act on the intelligence information regarding the concentration camps. Why did they choose not to act? Do you think their decision was justified in the context of the war?
  • Eisenhower's decision to allow the Soviets to capture Berlin has been the subject of much debate among historians. Why did he resist the pressure to push on to Berlin? Do you think it was a correct decision?
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: The Destruction of the Japanese Empire
Readings

1. Murray & Millett:

  • Chapter 17 – The Destruction of the Japanese Empire, 1944-1945.
  • Chapter 18 – The End of the Asia-Pacific War, 1945.

2. Bell:

  • Chapter 12 – The Defeat of Japan and the Atomic Bombs, 1945.

3. Coetzee and Coetzee:

  • Chapter 4
    • Navajo Code Talkers p. 124
  • Chapter 7
    • Kamikaze Attack p. 226
    • The Decision to Use the Bomb p. 228
    • Preparing to Invade Japan p. 230
    • Hiroshima p. 233
    • Marines on Peleliu p. 224
  • Chapter 8
    • Prayer at Iwo Jima p. 260
  • Chapter 12
    • Hiroshima, Culture Wars, and the Enola Gay p. 405
Discussion 19: Essential Questions

Respond to the following questions.

  • What inhibited the Allies from conducting an effective campaign in China and how did this affect the course of the war?
  • Why did the US decide to adopt a strategy of fire-bombing Japanese cities?
  • What was the significance of the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa?
  • What was the allied plan for the final defeat of Japan? How did the Japanese plan to defend their home islands?
Discussion 20: Online Research

Research any two topics from the list given below and write your response.

  • Curtis LeMay
  • Firebombing of Japan
  • Battle of Iwo Jima
  • Battle of Okinawa
  • Hirohito
  • Kamikaze
  • Operation Ketsu-Go
  • Operation Downfall
  • Manhattan Project
  • Potsdam Declaration
Discussion 21: Roundtable Discussion

Using materials from the readings in both textbooks as well as your online research, answer the following questions:

  • How effective was MacArthur as a military commander during the liberation of the Philippines?
  • Why did President Truman choose to use the Atom Bomb against Japan?
Scholarship Paper
  • Write a scholarship paper in which you critically analyze primary resources and related secondary sources. Submit your paper to the Dropbox by 11:59 pm CT of Week 7.
  • Post a one page summary of your paper in the Discussion area by 11:59 pm CT Thursday of Week 8, and comment on the work of at least one other student.
Week 8: The Impact and Aftermath of the War
Readings

1. Murray & Millett:

  • Chapter 19 – Peoples at War, 1937-1945.
  • Chapter 20 – The Aftermath of War.
  • Epilogue

2. Bell:

  • Conclusion

3. Coetzee and Coetzee:

  • Chapter 8
    • Readjusting to Family Life 262
  • Chapter 9
    • The Welfare State 306
  • Chapter 11
    • Out of the "Dark and Deadly Valley" p. 346
    • America's Plans for Postwar Germany p. 357
    • The Nuremberg Trials p. 359
    • Japanese Biological Warfare p. 364
    • The Tokyo War Trials p. 367
    • American Policy for Postwar Japan p. 369
    • Japan Adjusts to Occupation p. 371
    • Revolution and Liberation in Indochina p. 374
    • Ho Chi Minh Appeals to Truman p. 376
    • "The Long Telegram" and Containment p. 378
    • The Iron Curtain p. 381
    • The American Century p. 384
  • Chapter 12
    • Commemorating World War II: Confronting the Past, Writing the
    • Future p. 386
    • Remembering D-Day and the Boys of Pointe du Hoc p. 389
    • Germany Commemorates the Fortieth Anniversary of Defeat p. 392
    • The Soviet Union and the Uses of Victory p. 395
    • The Holocaust Museum p. 398
    • Japan and the War's Contested Memory p. 401
Discussion 22: Essential Questions

Respond to the following questions.

  • What were the major American strengths that contributed to the Allied victory?
  • What was the long-term impact of the war on American society?
  • How did the occupation policies of the Western Allies differ from those of the USSR and what was the long term impact of that difference?
Discussion 23: Online Research

Research Paper Extract: Post a synopsis of your research paper.

  • Describe the topic you investigated, your conclusions based on your research, and how your research contributed to your understanding of the topic.
  • This will give you the opportunity to present your conclusions about your topic and share papers that may be of interest to others.
  • Comment on at least one of the papers written by a classmate.
Discussion 24: Roundtable Discussion
  • Evaluate the conclusions reached by Murray and Millett in the Epilogue based on all the readings and discussions throughout the course.
  • Do you agree with their conclusions? Why or why not?
Final Exam

The Midterm Exam covers course material from Weeks 5 - 8. It is broken down into 2 sections. Section 1 contains 50 multiple choice questions covering major people, place, and events of the war. Section 2 requires you to answer 4 of 5 essay questions requiring analysis and discussion of some of the major aspects of the conflict. You will have 2 hours to complete this closed book, no note, proctored exam. The exam opens at 12:01 am CT Tuesday, and must be complete by Saturday at 11:59 pm CT.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

Initial answers to Discussion Questions posted after the Friday deadline will be assessed an automatic penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for every day late unless there are extenuating circumstances that have been discussed in advance with the instructor. Response comments to Discussion Questions must be posted by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT. No discussion postings will be accepted after the Sunday deadline.

Scholarship papers submitted after the Sunday deadline will be assessed an automatic penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for every day late unless there are extenuating circumstances that have been discussed in advance with the instructor. No scholarship papers will be accepted after Tuesday of Week 8 at 11:59 pm CT.

Tests must be completed according to the course schedule unless an approval for an early or late exam due to emergency or unexpected circumstances is obtained in advance.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


+

Request info