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Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

HIST 294: Introduction To The Historian's Craft

Course Description

Designed for the history major or minor, but open to non-majors as well, this course provides hands-on exploration of history and gives students a broad foundation in learning how to think and work as historians. Topics include the assessment of issues such as the causes of events and the reliability of evidence. Students will learn how to critically analyze primary and secondary sources and use a variety of approaches to history, including oral history, quantitative history and digital history. As a central project, students will craft a research proposal as a solid foundation for more advanced work in the history major/minor. Completion with a grade of C or higher is required.

Prerequisite: Six hours of history at the 100 level

Proctored Exams: Midterm



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Davidson, James West and Mark Hamilton Lytle. After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection. 6th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.
    • ISBN-978-0-073-38548-8
  • Furay, Conal and Michael J. Salevouris. The Methods and Skills of History: A Practical Guide. 4th ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell Press, 2015.
    • ISBN-978-1-118-74544-1
      • Note: THIS IS A WORKBOOK AND MUST BE PURCHASED NEW.
  • Turabian, Kate. A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. 8th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013.
    • ISBN-978-0-226-81638-8
  • Williams, Robert C. The Historian’s Toolbox: A Student’s Guide to the Theory and Craft of History. 3rd ed. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, Inc, 2012.
    • ISBN-978-0-7656-3327-9

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

This course provides hands-on exploration of history and gives students a broad foundation in learning how to think and work as historians. Topics include the assessment of issues such as causes of events, the reliability of evidence, and analysis of primary and secondary sources. The course also explores the interpretation of a variety of non-print sources and methods of analysis used by historians. As a central project, students will craft a research proposal as a solid foundation for more advanced work in the history major or minor. 

HIST 294 is designed to equip you to complete quality research projects in history electives and to write the senior thesis in the capstone course, HIST 494. It is recommended that you take this course in your second year of study after having completed at least two of the survey courses in American History, World History, or Western Civilization.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of key events in U.S., European, and World history.
  2. Identify appropriate primary sources and secondary sources on a historical topic.
  3. Analyze primary source materials and explain their historical context.
  4. Detect assumptions, bias, and opinions in secondary source materials on controversial issues in the past.
  5. Produce a literature review and a research prospectus using the Chicago Style.
  6. Describe and explain an essential question for historical research.
  7. Use correct Chicago Style for citation.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions 340 34%
Research Proposal Design 250 25%
Research Skills Labs 210 21%
Workbook Exercises 180 18%
History Assessment Test 20 2%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introductions -- Wednesday
Weekly Focus Discussion Question 1 15 Sunday
Application Discussion Question 1 15
Research Skills Lab 1 30
Workbook Exercise 1: Chapters 1 & 2 30
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Weekly Focus Discussion Question 2 15 Sunday
Application Discussion Question 2 15
Research Question Discussion 1: Topic 20
Research Skills Lab 2: Library Assignment 30
Workbook Exercise 2: Chapters 3, 4 & 7 45
Research Topics 10
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Weekly Focus Discussion Question 3 15 Sunday
Application Discussion Question 3 15
Research Question Discussion 2: Research Questions 20
Research Skills Lab 3: Secondary Sources 30
Workbook Exercise 3: Chapters 5, 8 & 12 45
Research Questions 15
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Weekly Focus Discussion Question 4 15 Sunday
Application Discussion Question 4 15
Research Skills Lab 4: Primary Sources 30
Workbook Exercise 4: Chapters 10 & 15 30
Midterm—History Assessment Test (HAT) 20
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Weekly Focus Discussion Question 5 15 Sunday
Application Discussion Question 5 15
Research Question Discussion 3: Sources 20
Research Skills Lab 5: Citations 30
Workbook Exercise 5: Chapter 11 15
Annotated Bibliography 50
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Weekly Focus Discussion Question 6 15 Sunday
Application Discussion Question 6 15
Research Question Discussion 4: Images 20
Research Skills Lab 6: Material Culture 30
Literature Review 75
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Weekly Focus Discussion Question 7 15 Sunday
Application Discussion Question 7 15
Research Question Discussion 5: Public History Sites 20
Research Skills Lab 7: Public History 30
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Weekly Focus Discussion Question 8 15 Saturday
Application Discussion Question 8 15
Workbook Exercise 6: Chapter 9 15
Research Proposal 100
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

There will be 3 types of discussion topics in the class. Weekly Focus questions will help you to define and understand the basic concepts for that week. Application questions will ask you to apply the concepts to specific historical events. Both the Weekly Focus and Application questions are tied to the assigned readings for the week. Throughout the course there will also be a series of research discussions where you will post updates about your research design and have the opportunity to comment on your peers’ work.

Weekly discussion posts are objective academic exercises. Your postings should be original, relevant observations of the assigned topic(s). They are formal writing. Therefore they should be intelligible and effectively communicate your ideas by following the rules of proper grammar, including capitalization, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphs.

You are expected to read the posts of your fellow classmates and respond to at least one other student posting in each discussion topic each week. Simply rephrasing another student’s post is not acceptable. All responses should be original and relevant to the assigned topic.

The key to these posts is quality, NOT quantity! While you have until 11:59pm CT Sunday from Weeks 1 to 7 to post, it is strongly advised that postings be done earlier in the week to facilitate the discussion. For Week 8, all discussion posts are due by 11:59pm CT Saturday.

Discussion posts will be graded according to the following criteria:

  • Posts fully address all of the questions.

  • Posts are well-written and free from grammatical errors.

  • Posts utilize and properly cite the assigned materials.

  • Student responds to at least one other student posting in each discussion topic.


Research Proposal

Over the eight weeks of this session you will select a research topic and complete a variety of assignments related to that topic which will culminate in a written research proposal. The project design includes selection of a topic (10 points), writing of research questions (15 points), compilation of an annotated bibliography (50 points), literature review (75 points) and the final research proposal (100 points). There is a total of 250 points possible for the assignments that are a part of the research project design.


Research Skills Labs

Each week there will be a set of readings and an assignment that will help you build your research skills. Assignments vary by week and are tied to the skill set for that week. All assignments are worth 30 points each. There is a total of 210 points possible for the research skills lab assignments. Reading assignments for the skills labs are noted with (SL).


Workbook Exercises

In many of the weeks there are one or more chapters to complete in the workbook, The Methods and Skills of History. Workbook exercises may either be scanned or typed into a Word document and then uploaded to the appropriate Dropbox each week. Each chapter’s exercises is worth 15 points. There is a total of 180 points possible for the workbook exercises.


History Assessment Test

The midterm exam is the History Assessment Test. This is a 120 question, multiple-choice exam that tests your knowledge of American, European, and World history and historiography. The data we collect from this exam helps us to assess how much students learn in their history electives. You will take the post-test version of the HAT in your HIST 494 course. This is a proctored, closed-book exam and you will have 2 hours to complete it. You will earn 20 points for completing the HAT, regardless of your score. You must complete the HAT in order to access the Dropbox for your final Research Proposal.

Note: You must complete the HAT in order to access the Dropbox to submit your final Research Proposal.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: History and the Historian’s Craft
Reading Assignments
  • The Methods and Skills of History

    Chapter 1, The Uses of History (pp. 3-11)

    Chapter 2, The Nature of History (pp. 13-26)

  • After the Fact

    Prologue, The Strange Death of Silas Deane (pp. xvii-xxxii)

    Chapter 2, Serving Time in Virginia (pp. 31-51)

  • The Historian’s Toolbox

    Part I (pp. 3-44) (SL)

    Chapter 14, Everyday History (pp. 151-155)

  • Manual for Writers

    Chapter 1, What Research Is and How Researchers Think About it (pp. 5-11) (SL)

Introductions

To get started with the course, post a message in the “Introductions” topic on the first day of the course.

Weekly Focus Discussion Question 1

What are the various ways that we can define history?  How and why can the definition of history change? How does the story of Silas Deane reflect the complex nature of defining and doing history? Why is writing history considered a craft? What skills are necessary to be a good historian? Please post your response and comment on at least one other student’s posting by Sunday night.

Application Discussion Question 1

Why does perspective matter in understanding the history of Pocahontas and John Smith in the Virginia Colony? How does the question of historical truth come into play in this story? Please post your response to the posted application questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Skills Lab 1

Identify three potential research topics you might like to explore for your research proposal in this class.  One must be an American History topic; one must be a European history topic; one must be a World History topic (Africa, Asia, Latin America—not the United States, Western Europe, or Russia).  Complete the Topics Worksheet found in the Content area for Week 1 to help analyze each topic and assign it a total score out of 100.

Workbook Exercise 1: Chapters 1 & 2

After reading the assigned chapter in the workbook The Methods and Skills of History, complete Exercises A1 & A2 in Chapter 1 and Exercises B1 & B2 in Chapter 2 and submit your work to the Dropbox.

Week 2: Historical Thinking: Continuity & Change and Multiple Causality
Reading Assignments
  • The Methods and Skills of History

    Chapter 3, Historical Thinking: Continuity and Change (pp. 27-42)

    Chapter 4, Historical Thinking: Multiple Causality (pp. 43-63)

    Chapter 7, Libraries: Real and Virtual (pp. 103-129) (SL)

  • After the Fact

    Chapter 13, The Decision to Drop the Bomb (pp. 310-338)

    Chapter 15, Sitting-In (pp. 366-395)

  • The Historian’s Toolbox

    Chapter 8, Doing History: An Overview (pp. 47-55)

    Chapter 11, Narrative and Explanation (pp. 91-111)

  • Manual for Writers

    Chapter 3 (pp. 24-36) (SL)

Weekly Focus Discussion Question 2

How does each of the following impact historical thinking: continuity, change, and multiple causality? Please post your response to the posted focus questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Application Discussion Question 2

In what ways do you see the element of continuity in the sit-ins of the civil rights movement? In what ways are the sit-ins evidence of change? How do the multiple actors involved in the decision to drop the atomic bomb reflect the principles of multiple causality? Please post your response to the application questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Question Discussion 1: Topic

Post a brief essay describing the historical topic you plan to research for this course to the discussion and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Skills Lab 2: Library Assignment

Complete the Library Assignment worksheet found in the Content area for Week 2 and upload it to the appropriate Dropbox.

Workbook Exercise 2: Chapters 3, 4 & 7

After reading the assigned chapter in the workbook The Methods and Skills of History, complete exercises A1 & B1 in Chapter 3, A1 & A2 in Chapter 4 and all of the Set A exercises in Chapter 7 and submit your work to the Dropbox.

Research Topics

Write a brief essay describing the historical topic you plan to research for this course. Your description should include information about the topic, why you chose this topic, and what you think your thesis might be. Submit it to the appropriate Dropbox by Sunday night. Please note that you must receive approval of your topic from the instructor before completing any future assignments in the research project design.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Historical Thinking: Context and Interpretation
Reading Assignments
  • The Methods and Skills of History

    Chapter 5, Historical Thinking: Context (pp. 65-81)

    Chapter 8, Reading History (pp. 131-150)

    Chapter 12, Interpretation (pp. 217-240) (SL)

  • After the Fact

    Chapter 3, The Visible and Invisible Worlds of Salem (pp. 52-74)

  • The Historian’s Toolbox

    Chapter 12, Interpretation (pp. 112-127) (SL)

  • Manual for Writers

    Chapter 2, Moving from a Topic to a Question to a Working Hypothesis (pp. 12-23)

    Chapter 4, Engaging Sources (pp. 37-48)

Weekly Focus Discussion Question 3

What does context mean to historians? Why is it important to adequately understand and explain the context of historical events? How is interpretation different from context? Why does interpretation vary among different historians? Please post your response to the posted focus questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Application Discussion Question 3

What factors explain the historical context of the events in Salem Village in 1691-1692? Be sure to discuss both the invisible and the visible factors. Please post your response to the posted application questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Question Discussion 2: Research Questions

Post the list and explanation of the 3-4 research questions about your topic that you will use for your research and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Skills Lab 3: Secondary Sources

Read the information posted in the Research Skills Lab section for Week 3 and complete the assignment noted there. See the description of the Secondary Sources Research Skills Assignment in the Content area for the specific details of this assignment.

Workbook Exercise 3: Chapters 5, 8 & 12

After reading the assigned chapter in the workbook The Methods and Skills of History, complete exercises A1 & B1 in Chapter 5, the Set A exercises in Chapter 8 and exercises A1, A2 & A4 in Chapter 12.

Research Questions

List and explain the 3-4 research questions about your topic that you will use for your research proposal. This must be uploaded to the appropriate Dropbox. Please note that you must receive approval of your research questions from the instructor before completing any future assignments in the research project design.

Week 4: Historical Thinking: Historiography and Primary Sources
Reading Assignments
  • The Methods and Skills of History

    Chapter 10, Evidence (pp. 167-196) (SL)

    Chapter 14, The History of History (pp. 253-270)

    Chapter 15, History and the Disciplines (pp. 271-286)

  • After the Fact

    Chapter 4, Declaring Independence (SL)

    Chapter 6, Jackson’s Frontier—and Turner’s

    Chapter 7, The Madness of John Brown

  • The Historian’s Toolbox

    Chapter 9, Sources and Evidence (pp. 56-78) (SL)

Weekly Focus Discussion Question 4

What is the basic form of evidence that historians use to make their arguments? How are primary sources interpreted? How has the writing of history (historiography) changed over time? Why? What is the relationship between history and other disciplines? Please post your response to the posted focus questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Application Discussion Question 4

How does our understanding of the Declaration of Independence change with a close reading and analysis of it as a primary source? What is Frederick Jackson Turner’s Frontier Thesis and how has it impacted the interpretation of American History? How can the story of John Brown be understood as an exercise in psychological history? Please post your response to the posted application questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Skills Lab 4: Primary Sources

See the description of the Primary Sources Research Skills Assignment in the Content area for the specific details of this assignment.

Workbook Exercise 4: Chapters 10 & 15

After reading the assigned chapter in the workbook The Methods and Skills of History, complete exercises A1, A2, A3 & A4 in Chapter 10 and exercises 1, 2 & 3 in Chapter 15.

Midterm—History Assessment Test (HAT)

Please complete the HAT exam by midnight Sunday. This is the History Assessment Test and will assess your knowledge of basic historical facts. You must complete the HAT in order to access the Dropbox for your final research proposal.

Week 5: Varieties of Sources: Oral History and Quantitative Analysis
Reading Assignments
  • The Methods and Skills of History

    Chapter 11, Oral Histories, Statistics, and Photographs (pp. 197-216)

  • After the Fact

    Chapter 8, The View from the Bottom Rail (pp. 171-202)

    Chapter 12, Dust Bowl Odyssey (pp. 284-309)

  • The Historian’s Toolbox

    Chapter 10, Credit and Acknowledgment (pp. 79-90) (SL)

    Chapter 15, Oral History (pp. 156-163)

  • Manual for Writers

    Chapter 15, General Introduction to Citation Practices (pp. 135-143) (SL)

    Chapter 16, Notes-Bibliography Style: The Basic Form (pp. 144-163) (SL)

    Chapter 17, Notes-Bibliography Style: Specific Types of Sources (pp. 164-215) (SL)

Weekly Focus Discussion Question 5

What are the advantages and disadvantages of oral histories? How can statistics be used as primary sources, and what do they allow historians to understand that other primary sources do not? Please post your response to the posted focus questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Application Discussion Question 5

In what ways do the two different accounts of slavery told by Susan Hamlin/Susan Hamilton demonstrate the potential pitfalls of using oral histories as primary source material? What factors do you believe account for the differences in these accounts by the same woman? How does the use of statistical evidence challenge the traditional narrative of the Dust Bowl and those who left it? Please post your response to the posted application questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Question Discussion 3: Sources

Post a brief description of one primary source and one secondary source for your research project. Explain why each of these is a useful source for your topic. You must comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Skills Lab 5: Citations

See the description of the Citations Research Skills Assignment in the Content area for the specific details of this assignment.

Workbook Exercise 5: Chapter 11

After reading the assigned chapter in the workbook The Methods and Skills of History, complete exercises A1, A2, and A3 in Chapter 11.

Annotated Bibliography

As part of your research proposal you must submit an annotated bibliography of primary and secondary sources on your research topic. Specific details regarding this assignment are in the Content area of the course.

Week 6: Varieties of Sources: Images and Material Culture
Reading Assignments
  • The Historian’s Toolbox

    Chapter 16, Material Culture (pp. 164-169) (SL)

  • After the Fact

    Chapter 5, Material Witness (pp. 98-123) (SL)

    Chapter 9, The Mirror with a Memory (pp. 203-228)

Weekly Focus Discussion Question 6

What kinds of items constitute material culture? How can they be used as primary sources? What are the advantages of these types of sources? What are the challenges to interpreting them? What kinds of images can be used as primary sources? What are the challenges to interpreting images? What kind of information is necessary when analyzing an image? Please post your response to the posted focus questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Application Discussion Question 6

What does the use of material culture as primary source tell us about how daily life in America changed over time? What is the importance of the images captured by Jacob Riis? What do they tell us about poverty in New York City that written documents cannot? Please post your response to the posted application questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Question Discussion 4: Images

Post an image which can be used as a primary source in your research proposal. Briefly explain what that image tells you about your topic. You must comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Skills Lab 6: Material Culture

See the description of the assignment in the Content area for the specific details. Submit your assignment to the appropriate Dropbox.

Literature Review

See the description of the Literature Review Assignment in the Content area for the specific details of this assignment. Submit your assignment to the appropriate Dropbox by Sunday night.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Varieties of Sources: Public History and Television
Reading Assignments
  • After the Fact

    Chapter 14, From Rosie to Lucy (pp. 339-365)

  • The Historian’s Toolbox

    Chapter 17, Public History (pp. 170-176) (SL)

    Chapter 18, Event Analysis (pp. 177-181)

    Chapter 20, History on the Internet (pp. 187-192)

Weekly Focus Discussion Question 7

How would you define public history? Give some examples of what constitutes public history. Why is it important for historians to be involved in crafting public history? What are the challenges in doing public history? Please post your response to the posted focus questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Application Discussion Question 7

How can television shows be a primary source? What does the show I Love Lucy teach us about American ideas regarding gender roles in the 1950s? Do you believe that this show reflects American attitudes on this topic more than it shapes them? Please post your response to the posted application questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Question Discussion 5: Public History Sites

Identify a public history site that is related to your topic. Write a brief description of it and provide a link to any websites about it. Explain whether or not you believe this is a quality explanation of your topic. You must comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Research Skills Lab 7: Public History

See the description of the Public History Assignment in the Content area for the specific details of this assignment. Submit your assignment to the appropriate Dropbox.

Week 8: History and Film
Reading Assignments
  • The Methods and Skills of History

    Chapter 9, History on Film (pp. 151-166) (SL)

  • After the Fact

    Chapter 17, Where Trouble Comes (pp. 420-448)

  • The Historian’s Toolbox

    Chapter 13, Speculation (pp. 128-150) (SL)

Weekly Focus Discussion Question 8

Why is it important to understand how to analyze history on film? How do we as historians evaluate history on film? Please post your response to the posted focus questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Application Discussion Question 8

What are the various ways that the Vietnam War has been portrayed on film? How has film changed the ways we interpret the events of Vietnam? Please post your response to the posted application questions and comment on at least one other student’s posting.

Workbook Exercise 6: Chapter 9

After reading the assigned chapter in the workbook The Methods and Skills of History, select a film from the list in the History on Film Assignment in the Content area for Week 8 and complete the Chapter 9 workbook exercises on page 166.

Research Proposal

See the description of the final Research Proposal for the specific details of this assignment. Submit your proposals to the appropriate Dropbox. Remember that you must have taken the History Assessment Test in order to access the Dropbox.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Tests must be completed according to the course schedule, unless an emergency leave is obtained in advance. Late work will be assessed an automatic 10% penalty reduction in score for each late day (including weekends), up to a total reduction of 50%.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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