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Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

HIST 112: World History Since 1500

Course Description

This course surveys the major developments that have shaped the human experience since 1500 CE. The course will examine overall patterns of global history, characteristics of the world’s major modern civilizations, and the relationships and exchanges among these societies. Major themes include humans and their environment, culture, politics and government, economics, and social structures.  Students will also gain insight into the historical roots of many of the world’s major cultural traditions. Offered Spring semesters.  G.E.  Course meets multicultural graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: None

Proctored Exams: Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Strayer, Robert W., and Eric W. Nelson . Ways of the World: A Brief Global History with Sources, Vol. 2. 3rd ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2016.
    • ISBN-978-1-319-01842-9

Recommended

  • Rampolla, M. L. (n.d.). A Pocket Guide to Writing in History. Latest Edition Recommended. Bedford/St. Martin's, 2016.

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

By exploring the history of the world since 1500 CE, HIST 112 examines why the world is the way it is. 

We will examine overall patterns of global history, including the expansion of western power since 1500 CE, the weakening of western hegemony during the 20th century, and reactions to those processes by non-western societies.

The course also explores the relationships and exchanges among these societies--whether through the enormity of the Atlantic Slave Trade, or the more recent trends of globalization.  Major themes include humans and their environment, culture, politics, military events, economics, and social structures. 



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyze and interpret primary sources from the period between 1500 CE and the present and use them as evidence to support historical arguments.
  2. Identify and describe the context and significance of major figures, ideas, and events of world history since 1500 CE.
  3. Construct a historical essay based on primary documents.
  4. Analyze other time periods and cultures since 1500 CE with little or no ethnocentrism or modern bias.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (16) 200 20%
Essays (3) 300 30%
Quizzes (3) 300 30%
Final Exam 150 15%
Assessments Pre- and Post-Test (2) 50 5%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 12 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 2 13
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 12 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 4 13
Quiz 1 100 Sunday
Assessment Pre-Test - required*** -
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 12 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 6 13
Plagiarism Tutorial and Quiz N/A Prior to Submitting Essay 1
Essay 1 100 Sunday
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 12 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 8 13
Quiz 2 100 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 12 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 10 13
Essay 2 100 Sunday
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 12 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 12 13
Quiz 3 100 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13 12 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 14 13
Essay 3 100 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15 12 Thursday/Saturday
Discussion 16 13
Final Exam 150 Saturday
Assessment Post-Test - required*** 50
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

***Assessments Pre- and Post-Tests

To earn the 50 points for this assignment, you must take both the Pre-test during Weeks 1-2 and the Post-test during Weeks 7-8.  The test consists of approximately 50 multiple-choice questions covering the entire course.  Full-credit is awarded only for completing both tests (the actual score on the test does not affect the course grade).  No partial credit is awarded; students must complete both tests to receive credit.


Discussions

All discussions must take place in the Discussions area, meaning that uploading an attachment as your post will not count.  Each week’s discussion will take place from Monday to Sunday, except for Week 8, which ends on Saturday. There are two Discussions Questions each week.  You must respond to both with Initial Posts for each due by 11:59 p.m. Central Time (CT) on Thursday and two responses per each Discussion Question to classmates due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday. During Week 8, the two responses are due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Saturday. This is a total of 6 posts per week: 2 Initial Posts; and 2 Response Posts per Discussion Question thread.

Each discussion is set so that you must post your original thoughts before reading the posts of your classmates. Your initial response to each Discussion Question should be a full paragraph of 200 words; all of the sentences should support your main claim (your topic sentence).  The entire paragraph should be written in your own words, without quoting any other sources.  If you are writing about a reading from our text, be sure to include the author and title in the first sentence or two so others know what piece you are referencing. Post should be written using correct grammar and spelling. 

Your responses to others’ posts should also be well developed, fully explaining your response to the classmates’ posts.  Make responses that add to the conversation and take it further; simply posting “I agree” or “good job” does not help develop ideas and cannot receive credit.  For maximum learning and point benefits, respond to at least two students’ posts for each Discussion Question. 

The first Initial Post and your responses within that thread are worth 13 points; the second Initial Post and your response within that thread are worth 12 points.


Essays

You will write three (3) essays during Weeks 3, 5, and 7, due Sunday 11:59 p.m. CT. All essays are responses to questions based on the student’s analysis of assigned primary source documents.

The essays must be between 1000 and 1200 words in length. They must be double-spaced, using a normal-sized font, such as Times New Roman 12-point, and properly cited using Chicago-Style citation (Cite sources—whether directly quoted, paraphrased or summarized.). They must use appropriate scholarly sources rather than dubious sources such as Wikipedia.

Your essays should be plagiarism free which means they should contain no plagiarism whatsoever; any plagiarized material will receive zero points and may result in further action as per College policy.

Each Essay should be submitted to the course Dropbox in Word .doc, .docx, or in .rtf format. Be sure that your essay actually points to evidence from the documents. Show me, don’t just tell me.  The Dropbox folder for Essay 1 will not open until students have taken the Plagiarism Tutorial and Quiz, located in the “Quizzes” section of the D2L site.


Quizzes

During Weeks 2, 4, and 6, you will take a 30-question, multiple-choice quiz that covers readings assigned since the last quiz.  You will have 45 minutes to complete the quiz and you will only receive one attempt.  You should study for the quizzes; while you may be tempted to use your book to help you find the answers, the time-limit means that you will not have time to simply look up answers.  Moreover, developing day-by-day and week-by-week study habits will put you in the best place to succeed on the final exam, when proctoring will mean that you will not at all be able to use the book or internet.  Each quiz is worth 100 points and is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday of the given week. 


Final Exam

You will take a proctored final exam during Week 8.  It will consist of two parts.  Part One consists of 50 multiple-choice questions on material assigned since Quiz 3 and is worth 75 points.  Part two will consist of a single essay (of approximately 800 words) covering the entire course and is worth 75 points.  You must provide your proctor information during Week 2.  Failure to schedule your exam with an approved proctor will prevent you from being able to take the exam. You will have 2 hours (120 minutes) to take the exam and will be given only one attempt. You may not use your books or any other materials to assist you during this final exam.  The exam will open Monday of Week 8 at 12:01 a.m. CT and is due by 11:59 p.m. CT Saturday.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Encounters through Empire, 1450-1750
Readings

Ways of the World:

  • “The Big Picture” and “Mapping Part Four,” p. 546-551
  • Chapter 13: "Political Transformations: Empires and Encounters 1450-1750,” pp. 552-589
Discussion 1

Introduce yourself to your fellow students.

Please tell us a little about yourself, including your name and your major, and discuss any special interests you may have in history.

If you don't think you have any interest in history (and this course aims to change that), think about any books or movies you have read or seen that are set any time in the past. What intrigues you about the book or movie's setting?

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 2

Why did the European empires in the Americas have such an enormously greater impact on the conquered people than did the Chinese, Mughal and Ottoman empires in Asia on the conquered people?

Use specific examples from the reading to support your points, so that you are persuasive in making your case.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Assessement Pre-Test

The Pre-test must be taken during Weeks 1-2.  It consists of approximately 50 multiple-choice questions covering the entire course.  In order to earn the 50 points for this assignment, you must also take the Post-test during Weeks 7-8. (The actual score on the test does not affect your course grade.)  No partial credit is awarded; students must complete both tests to receive credit.

Week 2: Commerce and Culture, 1450-1750
Readings

Ways of the World:

  • Chapter 14: "Economic Transformations: Commerce and Consequences, 1450-1750," pp. 601-641
  • Chapter 15: "Cultural Transformations: Religion and Science, 1450-1750," pp. 643-678
Discussion 3

What lasting legacies of early modern globalization are evident in the early 21st century? Pay particular attention to the legacies of the slave trade. As always, be sure to use specific examples from the reading, to support your response.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 4

In what ways was the missionary message of Christianity shaped by the cultures of Asian and American peoples? As always, be sure to use specific examples from the reading, to support your response.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Quiz 1

There will be 30 multiple choice questions and you will have 45 minutes to complete the quiz.

The quiz must be submitted no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Assessment Pre-Test - required***

The Pre-test must be taken during Weeks 1-2.  It consists of approximately 50 multiple-choice questions covering the entire course.  In order to earn the 50 points for this assignment, you must also take the Post-test during Weeks 7-8. (The actual score on the test does not affect your course grade.)  No partial credit is awarded; students must complete both tests to receive credit.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Political and Industrial Revolutions, 1750-1914
Readings

Ways of the World:

  • "The Big Picture," pp. 689-695
  • Chapter 16: "Atlantic Revolutions, Global Echoes, 1750-1914," pp. 696-735
  • Chapter 17: "Revolutions of Industrialization, 1750-1914," pp. 736-785
Discussion 5

Did the Atlantic revolutions accomplish or betray the ideals and goals of those who made them?  Address this question in both the short- and longer historical perspective.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 6

Confining your discussion to developments between 1750 and 1900, in what ways might the Industrial Revolution be seen as a global rather than simply a European phenomenon? 

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Plagiarism Tutorial and Quiz
Students must view the Plagiarism Tutorial and take the Plagiarism Quiz in order for the dropbox folder for Essay 1 to open.
Essay 1

Write an essay using those sources to address one of the following bulleted question-clusters; your thesis statement should reflect a response to the question-cluster you choose:

  • Cluster 1: While the different threads of Marxist socialism in nineteenth-century Europe shared some common themes, it was also a divided movement.  Based on the primary documents offered in the “Working with Evidence” section of Chapter 17, how would you describe those common perspectives?  How would you describe the key differences and points of division?
  • Cluster 2: To what extent did socialist thinking in the period between 1800 and 1914 reflect the issues of the Atlantic Revolutions explored in the previous chapter?  In what ways did socialist thinking depart from those earlier revolutionary upheavals?

Your thesis statement should reflect the question-cluster you have chosen.  Be sure to base your response on the documents themselves and the information provided in the preceding chapter. As you plan your essay, be sure to pay attention to format instruction on the syllabus, and to the guide document on essays, located under the Student Resources module in the Content area. Be sure to read the very first “Working with Evidence” section found early in the textbook, before Chapter 13 —it offers guidance on analyzing primary sources.

Week 4: Threats and Reactions in an Era of European Expansion, 1750-1914
Readings

Ways of the World:

  • Chapter 18: “Colonial Encounters in Asia, Africa, and Oceana, 1750-1950,” pp. 787-832.
  • Chapter 19: “Empires in Collision: Europe, the Middle East, and East Asia, 1800-1914,” pp. 833-871.
Discussion 7

Did colonial rule “freeze” colonized societies by preserving old social and economic patterns, or was colonial rule a disruptive force of change?  Provide specific evidence to support each side of this question.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 8

What kinds of debates, controversies and conflicts were generated by western intrusion within each of the states discussed in Chapter 19?

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Quiz 2

There will be 30 multiple choice questions and you will have 45 minutes to complete the quiz.

The quiz must be submitted no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Week 5: Europe’s Collapse and Recovery, 1914-1970s
Readings

Ways of the World:

  • “The Big Picture,” pp. 872-879
  • Chapter 20: “Collapse at the Center: World War, Depression, and the Rebalancing of Global Power, 1914-1970s”  
Discussion 9

What explains the disasters that overtook Europe between 1914 and 1945?  This is not a “what happened?” question, but a “why did it happen?” question.  Be sure to address larger structural and cultural factors. 

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 10

In what ways did Europe’s internal conflicts between 1914 and 1945 have global implications?

Discuss at least two non-western societies.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Essay 2

You may choose either one of the two question-clusters below:

  • Cluster 1: Read carefully the two documents in the section “Ideologies of the Axis Powers” at the end of Chapter 20. Write an essay addressing the following questions:  In what ways did Hitler and the authors of the Cardinal Principles find fault with mainstream Western societies and their political and social values?
  • Cluster 2: Read carefully the two documents in the section “Ideologies of the Axis Powers” at the end of Chapter 20. Write an essay addressing the following questions:  To what extent were the ideas in these documents new and revolutionary?  In what respects did they draw upon long-standing traditions in their societies?  What aspects of modern life did they accept, and what aspects of modern life did they reject?

Your thesis statement should reflect the question-cluster you have chosen.  Be sure to base your response on the documents themselves and the information provided in the preceding chapter.  As you plan your essay, be sure to pay attention to format instruction on the syllabus, and to the guide document on essays, located under the Student Resources module in the Content area.

Week 6: The Rise and Decline of World Communism, 1917-present
Readings

Ways of the World:

  • Chapter 21: “Revolution, Socialism, and Global Conflict: the Rise and Fall of World Communism, 1917 – Present,” pp. 929-973
Discussion 11

Why did the communist experiment, which was committed to equality and a humane socialism, generate such oppressive, brutal, and totalitarian regimes? Please base your response on specific evidence from course readings and use actual examples from it to support your response. 

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 12

In what different ways did the Soviet Union and China experience communism during the twentieth century? Use specific examples from the reading, to support your response.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Quiz 3

It will have 30 multiple choice questions and you will have 45 minutes to complete it.

The quiz must be submitted by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: A New Era for the Global South, 1914-present
Readings

Ways of the World:

  • Chapter 22: “The End of Empire: The Global South on the Global Stage, 1914 – present,” pp. 975-1021
Discussion 13

In what ways did the colonial experience and the struggle for independence shape the agenda of newly-independent countries in the second half of the twentieth century? How did their pasts affect their policies? Use specific examples from the reading, to support your response.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 14

From the viewpoint of the early 21st century, to what extent had the goals of nationalism or independence movements been achieved? What were key achievements? What were key limitations or failures? Why? Use specific examples from the reading, to support your response.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Essay 3

Examine the section of “Working with Evidence” entitled “Contending for Islam.”  Write an essay based on any three of the four document excerpts in that section, addressing one of the following question-clusters:

  • Cluster 1: What are the core concerns that divide these authors? What historical circumstances might help to account for the very different understandings of Islam that are reflected in these documents?
  • Cluster 2: How do you think Kemal Ataturk would have responded to later Islamic modernists such as Sheikh Kabir and/or Saira Kham?

Your thesis statement should reflect the question-cluster you have chosen.  Be sure to base your response on the documents themselves and the information provided in the preceding chapter. As you plan your essay, be sure to pay attention to format instruction on the syllabus, and to the guide document on essays, located under the Student Resources module in the Content area.

Assessment Post-Test

The Assessment Post-Test opens in Week 7 and remains open through 11:59 pm CT, Saturday of Week 8.

Week 8: A Globalizing Planet, 1945-present
Readings

Ways of the World:

  • Chapter 23: “Capitalism and Culture: the Acceleration of Globalization since 1945"
Discussion 15

To what extent did the processes discussed in this chapter (economic globalization, feminism, fundamentalism, environmentalism) represent something new in the twentieth century? In what respects did they have roots in the more distant past?

Use specific examples from the reading, to support your response.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Saturday.

Discussion 16

Consider this statement: “The twentieth century marks the end of western dominance in world history.”

What evidence from the course reading material might support this statement? What evidence might contradict it?

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday.  You must respond to at least two students by 11:59 pm CT on Saturday.

Final Exam

This will be a 2 part exam and is proctored. Part 1 consists of 50 multiple-choice and true-false questions, covering textbook chapters 22 & 23. Part 2 consists of a single essay question addressing the entire period covered by the course.

The Final Exam must be submitted by 11:59 pm CT, Saturday.

Assessment Post-Test - required***

The Post-test must be taken during Weeks 7-8.  It consists of approximately 50 multiple-choice questions covering the entire course.  In order to earn the 50 points for this assignment, you must also have taken the Pre-test during Weeks 1-2. (The actual score on the test does not affect your course grade.)  No partial credit is awarded; students must complete both tests to receive credit.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

Late assignments will be penalized by 50% unless the instructor has granted an extension before the due date. Late essays submitted more than 5 calendar days after the due date will not receive credit. Quizzes cannot be taken late unless the instructor has approved a late quiz ahead of the deadline for completion. No late discussion posts or final exams will be accepted.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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