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Online classes

Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

EDUC 586: Techniques And Strategies Of Instructional Coaching

Course Description

This class will focus on the methods and techniques of instructional coaching incorporating the instructional coach model of classroom management, content planning, instruction, and assessment for learning.  Participants will identify their personal strengths and concerns, and will learn many strategies and techniques for application in school settings.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Teacher Certification in one or more areas.

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Davis, B. M. (2008). How to coach teachers who don’t think like you using literacy strategies to coach across content areas.Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4129-4910-1]
  • West, L. and Cameron, A. (2013). Agents of change: How content coaching transforms teaching and learning.Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
    • [ISBN-978-0-325-01383-1]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

In this course students will demonstrate an understanding of strategies and techniques needed to put into practice the models of instructional coaching, cognitive coaching, affective coaching, and content coaching. We will look at the steps involved in planning a coaching program for your school as well as how to cultivate the capacity of coaches to be self-aware leaders and communicators. Methods to analyze teacher development using student work, the tasks that teachers pose for students to complete, and classroom talk will also be explored. We will analyze coaches working with teachers in terms of the coaching decisions they make and the coaching moves and tools they use.  Students will create a handbook of strategies and techniques based on their personal coaching style.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To demonstrate understanding of the BIG 4 Instructional Model
  • To demonstrate understanding of Cognitive and Affective Coaching Model
  • To observe instructional coaches in the field and reflect on the model the coaches use to effectively impact teaching and instruction
  • To develop a handbook of strategies and techniques for addressing the BIG 4 through instructional coaching
  • To observe processes used by instructional coaches in the field to be instructional leaders and to spread instructional knowledge

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Create a written plan of instruction to guide work teaching BIG 4 Instructional Model
  • Demonstrate use of Cognitive and Affective Coaching Models as well as Thinking Maps
  • Prepare observation and reflection papers from field work watching instructional coaches model effective strategies with teachers
  • Prepare an Instructional Coaching handbook of Instructional strategies with teachers
  • Create a written plan for being an instructional leader and to assist in spreading instructional knowledge

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 513-570 90-100%
B 456-512 80-89%
C 399-455 70-79%
F 0-398 0-69%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions 150 26%
Reflections 120 21%
Coaching Handbook 300 53%
Total 570 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 15 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 2 15
Reflection 1 15
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 15 Thursday/Sunday
Reflection 2 15
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 15 Thursday/Sunday
Reflection 3 15
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 15 Thursday/Sunday
Reflection 4 15
Coaching Handbook Section 1: Big 4 Model of Instructional Coaching 50 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6 15 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 7 15
Reflection 5 15
Coaching Handbook Section 2: Draft 0 Thursday
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 15 Thursday/Sunday
Reflection 6 15
Coaching Handbook Section 2: Assessing Teacher Need 100 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 15 Thursday/Sunday
Reflection 7 15
Coaching Handbook Section 3: Coaching Model Defined 100 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Coaching Handbook Section 4 50 Thursday
Discussion 10 15 Thursday/Saturday
Reflection 8 15
Total Points 570

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Each initial post must be at least two paragraphs long and must demonstrate synthesis and application of the assigned reading material. Your initial response is due by 11:59 p.m. Central Time (CT) on Thursday. You are expected to respond to at least two of your classmates in the discussion by Sunday. Responses should be thoughtful, but do not need to be two paragraphs long. At least one reference (citation) to an outside source should be made in either the initial post or a response. Discussions will be graded according to the Discussion rubric located in the Content area.

Responses are due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday, with the exception of week 8 when responses are due on Saturday, the last day of class. In most cases, you must complete your initial post prior to having access to other students’ posts.


Reflections

Reflections and responses will be posted in the Discussion area.  Most weeks you will write a reflection on the week’s reading and class activities.  You will need to post your reflection and then respond to the reflection of one of your classmates.  To ensure each person receives a response, endeavor to respond to someone to whom no one else has responded.

Your reflection is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Thursday. Your responses are due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday, with the exception of week 8 when responses are due on Saturday, the last day of class. See the Content Area for additional instructions and grading criteria.


Coaching Handbook

Your final project for this class is to design a Coaching Strategies Handbook that you will be able to use in a coaching position.  Assignments are to be submitted to their respective Dropbox in the course on the day specified below. There are four sections to the handbook:

  • Section 1: Big 4 Model of Instructional Coaching. You will be required to find coaching strategies that support each of the issues in that model.Due 11:59 p.m. CT Sunday of Week 4.
  • Section 2:Assessing Teacher Need. In this section you will be finding strategies that support your coaching work with classroom teachers. A rough draft is due Thursday of Week 5. The finalized version is due 11:59 p.m. CT Sunday of Week 6.
  • Section 3: Coaching Model Defined.In this section you will be required to examine the coaching model that best fits your personal style and needs.You will explain the varying roles that coaches play with teachers and administration and propose feedback tools for teachers and evaluation tools for coaches. Due 11:59 p.m. CT Sunday of Week 7.
  • The last section is on Leadership and Professional Development.In this section you will identify strategies that support the work you do to provide leadership and professional development for groups of teachers.Due 11:59 p.m. CT Saturday of Week 8.

See the Content area of the course for additional instructions and grading criteria.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: What is Coaching?
Readings
  • West & Cameron: Chapters 1 and 2
  • Davis: Chapter 1
  • Video: How Coaching Impacts Teachers, Diane Sweeney (see link in Content Area)
  • Video:Coaching at the Elementary Level, Diane Sweeney (see link in Content Area)
Discussion 1
Introduce yourself to the class. Tell about your teaching experiences. Describe the strengths you believe you bring to the coaching role. Cite at least one author that has influenced your teaching experiences. Tell us about the grade levels you think you would be most comfortable coaching.Replace this text with your 'Section' text.
Discussion 2
How do you define the role of coach?  Think about the roles a coach must demonstrate when working with the elementary classroom teacher, the science or music teacher, the principal and assistant principal, and parents.
Reflection 1
Consider the role of respect when working with teachers as a coach. How do you define respect? How do you deal with it when you’re not shown respect in a professional setting? How will you use respect with teachers who may not want to be coached?
Week 2: Communication is Key
Readings
  • West & Cameron: Chapters 4 and 5
  • Davis: Chapter 3
  • Video:Questioning to Understand, Lucy West (see link in Content Area)
  • Video:Coaching at the Secondary Level, Diane Sweeney (see link in Content Area)
Discussion 3

On page 82 in the text, Agents of Change, West & Cameron state, “Sometimes in our questioning, we uncover gaps in a teacher’s content knowledge or limits in their repertoire of instructional strategies. These gaps and limits expose ignorance, incompetence, or imperfection – to most people, these are unsettling revelations that make us feel vulnerable and may challenge our identity as competent professionals."

Think of a teacher you know who is either very much like you or very different from you. Write about three strategies that you could use in this situation to make that person feel safe?

Reflection 2
Look at the questions on pages 81 and 82 of the text, Agents of Change, by West & Cameron.  Think about those questions and answer at least three of them as they relate to you and your current experiences in teaching.
Week 3: Assessing Teacher Need
Readings
  • West & Cameron: Chapter 6
  • Davis: Chapters 6 and 7
  • Video:Culture of Classroom Discourse, Lucy West (see link in Content Area)
  • Video:Types of Talk, Lucy West (see link in Content Area)
  • Video:Evidence Is in the Learning, Lucy West(see link in Content Area)
Discussion 4
What is your understanding about the importance of the coach evaluating the evidence of student work in a teacher’s classroom and the quality of talk in a classroom in order to determine a starting point in coaching decisions for that teacher? You may use information from the text as well as your own experiences working with teachers to help clarify your thinking as you answer this question.
Reflection 3

Many times a teacher’s resistance and negativity may turn out to be about fear of change or fear of trying to change and failing. Going below the surface (this is what she does – resist) and finding reasons for why she is doing it (she is afraid) will give you more options for coaching.

Write your own personal narrative of when you were afraid of trying something new. What helped you survive that experience? Was it a specific person? What did they do that helped you?

Week 4: Lesson Design in a Pre-conference
Readings
  • Heinemann Case Study Videos on Pre-conferences. Watch the following eight videos prior to reading the chapter; Gathering Information to Inform the Lesson, Getting More Specific, Differentiating the Lesson, Making Explicit the Big Ideas, Visuals and Pacing, The Importance of Specificity, Making Student Thinking Visible, and Recapping the Lesson. Instructions for accessing these videos will be in the Content Area.
  • West & Cameron: Chapter 7
  • Davis: Chapter 8
Discussion 5
How do you, as a coach, address important issues of teacher practice and challenge thinking without alienating the person you are coaching?
Reflection 4
As you think about the work with teachers in these chapters, review the affective tools on page 69 of the Agents of Change text. Think about a time when you, or a colleague, might have benefited from one or more of these tools. Reflect on that experience.
Coaching Handbook Section 1: Big 4 Model of Instructional Coaching

General guidelines for organizing each section are: 1) An introduction to the section is expected; 2) The expectation is that you should discuss each bulleted item in the list below. A simple list of strategies is unacceptable; 3) Explain why you chose each strategy and how you would use that strategy in the school in which you are currently teaching or a school in which you’ve taught before; and, 4) A conclusion is expected for each section.

50 pts. Due Sunday.

  • Discuss four strategies that you would use to help a teacher create community.
  • Discuss four strategies that you would use to help a teacher manage a classroom.
  • Identify four strategies that you would use in a classroom to ensure that students are experiencing engaging, meaningful activities
  • Choose three strategies or tools that students can use to monitor personal learning targets or goals.
Week 5: Co-teaching the Lesson
Readings
  • Heinemann Case Study Videos on Co-Teaching. Watch the following seven videos prior to reading the chapter; Going With the Flow, Co-Teaching: Entering the Lesson, Modeling for the Teacher, Stepping Back, Highlighting Big Ideas, Evidence of Teacher Improvement, and Stretching the Teacher’s Capacity. Instructions for accessing these videos will be in the Content Area.
  • West & Cameron: Chapter 8
  • Davis: Chapter 9
Discussion 6
Read the document “Listening Stumbling Blocks” on page 199 of the text Agents of Change. Consider which of these you have experienced. Choose at least three to write about. Share examples of when you have a tendency to get tripped up by these stumbling blocks.
Discussion 7
Peer Review Assignment: Submit a rough draft of your own Coaching Handbook Section 2 to this discussion by Thursday at 11:59 pm (attach it to an initial post.) Then, comment on at least two other person’s rough drafts of the Coaching Handbook Section 2: Assessing Teacher Need by the Sunday due date. Make an effort to distribute your comments so everyone in the class will obtain peer review remarks. I will not be commenting or grading your handbook sections in this discussion. You are responsible for adding constructive comments for your classmates to help each other improve your handbook assignments.
Reflection 5
Reflect on your learning this week. You might choose to write about any of the questions in the reflection description in the Content Area or something else that helps you.
Coaching Handbook Section 2: Draft

The rough draft of this assignment must be submitted to Discussion 7 by Thursday, 11:59 pm.

General guidelines for organizing each section are:

  1. An introduction to the section
  2. A discussion of each bulleted item in the list below. A simple list of strategies is unacceptable;
  3. An explanation of why you chose each strategy and how you would use that strategy in the school in which you are currently teaching or a school in which you’ve taught before; 
  4. A conclusion for each section.
  • Identify and discuss four strategies to assess the quality of Student Talk in the classroom.
  • Identify and discuss four ways to increase teacher dialogue about teacher practice and student learning.
  • Discuss four ways to use student work in assessing a teacher’s professional beliefs and/or needs.
  • Describe six important teaching moves and/or questions that you would use in the Pre-lesson Conference. Be sure to include why these moves were important to the coaching work in the pre-lesson conference.
  • Describe six important teaching moves and/or questions that you would use in the Co-teaching part of the lesson. Be sure to include why these moves were important to the coaching work in the co-teaching part of the lesson.
  • Describe six important teaching moves and/or questions that you would use in the Post-lesson Conference. Be sure to include why these moves were important to the coaching work in the post-lesson conference.
  • Listening is a learnable skill. Listening well is a skill that is invaluable to coaches. Choose and discuss two important skills that a coach can use to deepen listening with working with a teacher.
Week 6: Debriefing in a Post-conference
Readings
  • Heinemann Case Study Videos on Post-conferences: Watch the following eight videos prior to reading the chapter; Focusing the Reflections, Selecting Specific Observations Related to the Goals, Weaving Teacher and Coach Concerns, Using Today’s Lesson to Inform Tomorrow’s, and Setting Future Goals.Instructions for accessing these videos will be in the Content Area.
  • West & Cameron: Chapter 9
Discussion 8
Read Scenario 1 on pages 201 and 202 of the text Agents of Change. Write about at least three different strategies that you could use to handle this situation in real life. Be sure to read and consider the communication skills list on pages 202 and 203 of the text Agents of Change.
Reflection 6
Reflect on your learning this week. You might choose to write about any of the questions in the Reflection Instructions in the Content area or something else that helps you.
Coaching Handbook Section 2: Assessing Teacher Need
Last week you submitted a rough draft of this assignment for peer review in Discussion 7. You may consider any peer review comments received as you revise and finalize your assignment for grading submission this week. Submit your finalized assignment to the appropriate dropbox in the course. Due Sunday.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Reflections on Coaching
Readings

Links to the following resources will be located in the Content area:

  • Symons, Kiley Walsh (2003). Literacy Coaching:How School Districts Can Support a Long-Term Strategy in a Short-Term World, ERIC Number: ED477297
  • Garmston, R., Linder, C., & Whitaker, J.(1993). Reflections on Cognitive Coaching.Educational Leadership, 51(2), 1-5.
  • Video:Moving Learning Forward, Lucy West
Discussion 9
Read Scenario 3 on page 202 of the text Agents of Change. Write about at least three different strategies that you could use to handle this situation in real life. Be sure to read and consider the communication skills list on pages 202 and 203 of the text Agents of Change.
Reflection 7
Reflect on your learning this week. You might choose to write about any of the questions in the Reflection Instructions in the Content Area or something else that helps you.
Coaching Handbook Section 3: Coaching Model Defined
Examine the coaching model that best fits your personal style and needs.You will explain the varying roles that coaches play with teachers and administration and propose feedback tools for teachers and evaluation tools for coaches. Due 11:59 p.m. CT Sunday of Week 7.
Week 8: Leadership through Professional Development
Readings

Links to the following resources will be located in the Content area:

  • Hyerle, David. (2004). Thinking Maps as a Transformational Language for Learning.
  • State of Hawaii D.O.E. (n.d.). Hawaii Adapted Framework for Teaching Literacy Coach Rubric.
  • Northern Illinois University. (n.d.). Instructional Scaffolding to Improve Learning,
  • Alder, Rebecca. (2014). 6 Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students,
  • Video:Developing Collaborative Habits of Mind, Lucy West
  • Video: Brain Research: Thinking Maps, Pat Wolfe
Coaching Handbook Section 4

General guidelines for organizing each section:

  1. An introduction to the section 
  2. A discussion of each bulleted item in the list below. A simple list of strategies is unacceptable.
  3. An explanation of why you chose each strategy and how you would use that strategy in the school in which you are currently teaching or a school in which you’ve taught before;
  4. A conclusion for each section.

Due Thursday

  • Describe four ways that you would build trust with the teachers with whom you work.
  • Describe a protocol for facilitating a book study group for teachers.
  • Identify four methods to help teachers understand the importance of strategies to scaffold instruction.
Discussion 10
Coaches must understand their personal habits of mind to help them interact successfully with teachers. Read the Habits of Mind document on page 195 of the Agents of Change text. Identify at least three of the ones you think you already have a good handle on and at least two that you may not yet have mastered. Discuss strategies that you might use to develop these habits.
Reflection 8

Communicate your learning across this course in three Thinking Maps. They may be about any of the topics we have read about or discussed. They may be about personal learning or about learning that you have applied from this course to work in your school. Attach them to your post and include a brief introduction.

Note: Thinking Maps may be created with Word, mind mapping software, or simply hand drawn and scanned as a JPEG file or photographed.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

No other late assignments will not be accepted without prior approval.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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