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Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

EDUC 512: The Integrated Curriculum

Course Description

The study of research, theorists and proponents of the integrated curriculum and instruction in the elementary, middle-level, and secondary schools.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; full MAT or M.Ed. status

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Drake, S. M. (2012). Creating standards-based integrated curriculum: The Common Core State Standards Edition (3rd). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4522-1880-9]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

In this course, we investigate different approaches to curriculum integration, including historic examples from the past and current trends. We will examine how schools are using curricular integration for student benefit and we will consider hindrances to their implementation. Along with discussing these integrated methods, you will also create your own integrated curriculum maps aligned with standards.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Understands how to make knowledge accessible to all students. (1.1)
  2. Demonstrates a deep understanding of the history, structure, and real-world applications of the subject matter. (2.1)
  3. Demonstrates skill and experience in teaching subject matter and is familiar with gaps and preconceptions students may bring to the subject. (2.2)
  4. Uses diverse instructional strategies to teach for understanding. (2.3)
  5. Demonstrates familiarity with learning theories and instructional strategies and stays abreast of current issues in American education. (4.2)
  6. Collaborates with others to improve student learning. (5.1)
  7. Works with other professionals on instructional policy, curriculum development, and staff development. (5.3)

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 504-560 90-100%
B 448-503 80-89%
C 392-447 70-79%
F 0-391 0-69%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (16) 160 29%
Reflection Papers (3) 150 27%
Integrated Curriculum Map Project (5) 250 45%
Total 560 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introductory Discussion -- Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 1 10
Discussion 2 10
Reflection Paper 1 50 Sunday
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 4 10
Curriculum Map Activity 1 50 Sunday
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 6 10
Curriculum Map Activity 2 50 Sunday
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 8 10
Curriculum Map Activity 3 50 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 10 10
Curriculum Map Activity 4 50 Sunday
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 12 10
Reflection Paper 2 50 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 14 10
Curriculum Map Activity 5 50 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15 10 Thursday/Saturday
Discussion 16 10
Reflection Paper 3 50 Saturday
Total Points 560

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Each week, your initial post for each discussion is due by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. CT. The minimum requirement for each initial post is 300 words. You must respond to at least one classmate’s post per week with a minimum 100-word post due by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. CT (except for Week 8, when responses are due by Saturday). Each discussion is worth 10 points.


Reflection Papers

In this course, you will write three (3) reflection papers. Each paper should be a minimum of 500 words and is worth 50 points. You should use APA style for citations. Papers 1 and 2 are due by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. CT in Weeks 1 and 6; Paper 3 is due by Saturday of Week 8.


Integrated Curriculum Map Projects

Curriculum Map Activity 1: Planning Guide

For the first map activity, you will create a plan for your map. Your plan should include:

  • Your subject and topic
  • Whether the map will be integrated horizontally, across three subjects on the same grade, or vertically, with the same subject across three grades
  • Three relevant standards that will align to your map
  • One activity and one assessment you would think would work well and align to your standards

Activity 1 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday of Week 2 and is worth 50 points.

Curriculum Map Activity 2: Essential Question Planning

For this activity, you will construct your essential questions. Consider the material in chapter 4, especially the information on the know/be/do umbrella and the section on creating quality essential questions. Then, construct the following:

  • Identify at least five relevant standards for your content. Note that this goes beyond the three from last week. Make sure that all of these align to your subject, topic, and grade level.
  • For each standard, list a Know/Be/Do statement. These should be a valid interpretation of the standard and reflect that standard.
  • For each standard, create an essential question. These should be skillfully written, clearly align with the standards, and meet the qualifications as discussed in chapter four.

Activity 2 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday of Week 3 and is worth 50 points.

 Curriculum Map Activity 3: Unit Assessments

For Activity 3, you will construct your rich, culminating assessment. This activity should align with the ideas in the reading for this week and accurately reflecting your standards and essential questions. You should also create a rubric that reflects the assessment description and communicates your expectations to your students.

  • List at least one relevant standard and essential question. Note: you can list more if your culminating assessment aligns with more than one standard and essential question.
  • Describe your culminating assessment in about 250 words. Make sure this assessment is thoroughly described and is comprehensive, multidimensional, and interdisciplinary. Also, it should clearly align with the standard and essential question.
  • Create an analytic rubric that reflects your assessment. This should contain at least three criteria, three scoring levels, and clear descriptors.

Activity 3 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday of Week 4 and is worth 50 points.

Curriculum Map Activity 4: Activities Description

For activity 4, you will describe the learning activities that will help lead up to your assessments. We’re going to focus on two standards, with essential questions and assessment descriptions. Last week you created a rich culminating assessment. You can choose to use that one if you’d like, or you can create two completely new ones. Keep in mind that for your final project you’ll need to have a culminating assessment for each essential question, for a total of five. Along with creating the learning activities, you will also describe gap or preconceptions that might hinder students from learning during your activity. Your activity should include the following:

  • Two listed standards, essential questions, and assessment descriptions.
  • Two activity descriptions, each one about 50-100 words, that align with the standards, essential questions, and assessments. Keep in mind that these are not full lesson plans. You’re just describing the activity.
  • A thoroughly described gap or preconception for each activity. This too should be about 50-100 words.

Activity 4 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday of Week 5 and is worth 50 points.

Curriculum Map: Final Project

Your final curriculum map should include revised and complete versions of the following:

  • Subject/Topic listed
  • Five standards
  • Five essential questions
  • Rich culminating assessment for each essential question—only one rubric is required
  • Two activities for each essential question
  • One gap or preconception listed for each activity

Activity 5 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday of Week 7 and is worth 50 points.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: What Is an Integrated Curriculum?
Readings
  • Drake: Chapter 1
  • Review Instructional Materials
Introductory Discussion
Introduce yourself and your education interests (e.g., if you’re currently working in education or if you would like to one day), and any personal information that you are willing to share to help us know you better. No points awarded for this discussion.
Discussion 1
How have you seen integrated curriculum in the classroom? Consider activities, lessons, or units that align with the topics in chapter one. If you are not a current teacher, look online and find an example of an integrated curriculum activity. After describing the activity, explain how it would be an example of either fusion, multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, or transdisciplinary integration.
Discussion 2
On p. 10 in our textbook, our author lists characteristics of 21st century classrooms. Choose one, or add a new one to the list, and explain why that characteristic is important. Then, describe how integrated curricula can exemplify that characteristic.
Reflection Paper 1

In this class, you’ll ultimately create an integrated curriculum map complete with essential questions, classroom activities, and assessments. For this first reflection, I want to get a sense of how you view these components working together. In a paper of 500 words, minimum, with references from the textbook and/or outside resources, consider this question:

How do essential questions, classroom activities, and assessments fit within a curriculum?

In crafting your response, consider your own classroom experiences as a teacher or student. Include examples to illustrate your points. 
Week 2: Approaches to Integrating Curriculum
Readings
  • Drake: Chapters 2, 3
  • Mapping the Journey to School Success (via Content area)
  • Review Instructional Materials
Discussion 3

For this discussion, you will delve into issues that schools face when integrating curricula. Interview at least three school district professionals, such as teachers, administrators, or superintendents, and find out how they are integrating curricula and any subsequent issues they have faced. Consider the following questions:

  • Does your district integrate curricular content? If so, how and at what grade levels? If not, what are some hindrances to doing so?
  • How do you balance integrated curriculum while still ensuring rigor and covering state standards?
  • What are ways that you assess integrated curricula?
In your post, synthesize the information you received from your interviews.
Discussion 4
In chapter three, you read about successful curriculum integrated programs. Considering your interview responses from Discussion 3, what are some ways that the examples in chapter three could help their schools with curriculum integration? What other advice would you give your interviewees in helping them to strengthen their curriculum through integration?
Curriculum Map Activity 1

This is the first step in the planning of your map. Using the example as a model, identify the following:

  • Your subject and topic
  • Whether the map will be integrated horizontally, across three subjects on the same grade, or vertically, with the same subject across three grades
  • Three relevant standards that will align to your map
  • One activity and one assessment you would think would work well and align to your standards
This assignment is worth 50 points and due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday of Week 2.
Week 3: Planning an Integrated Unit
Readings
  • Drake: Chapter 4
  • Connecting Learning: How Revisiting Big Idea Questions Can Help in History Classrooms (via Stafford Library)
  • How to Make Your Questions Essential (via Stafford Library)
  • Review Instructional Materials
Discussion 5
Consider the chapter’s discussion of the backwards design curriculum model. What does it mean to start with the end in mind? Also, what are the benefits of planning a curriculum this way and how does it help identify integrated concepts and skills? What might be some challenges with using this approach to construct a curriculum? If you have any experiences in planning or writing curriculum, feel free to incorporate those into your response.
Discussion 6
According to our textbook, essential questions are beneficial in many ways, including helping to frame your curriculum and connecting your content to broader, real-world ideas. How do these benefits compare with the discussion on essential questions found in our two accompanying articles for this week? In your response, reference all three sources: your textbook and the two articles.
Curriculum Map Activity 2

For this activity, you are moving beyond your initial planning of your curriculum map and starting to construct your essential questions. Consider the material in chapter 4, especially the information on the know/be/do umbrella and the section on creating quality essential questions.

  • Identify at least five relevant standards for your content. Note that this goes beyond the three from last week. Make sure that all of these align to your subject, topic, and grade level.
  • For each standard, list a Know/Be/Do statement. These should be a valid interpretation of the standard and reflect that standard.
  • For each standard, create an essential question. These should be skillfully written, clearly align with the standards, and meet the qualifications as discussed in chapter four.
This assignment is worth 50 points and due by 11:59 p.m. CT on the Sunday of Week 3.
Week 4: Planning Integrated Assessment
Readings
  • Drake: Chapter 5
  • The Quest for Quality (available via Stafford Library)
  • Web Resource: Creating Rubrics (via DePaul University)
  • Video: Performance as a Culminating Activity
  • Review Instructional Materials
Discussion 7
During Week 1, I asked you about your familiarity with integrated activities. Now, we will consider integrated assessments. Describe an example of an integrated assessment that you’ve seen in the classroom. If you cannot think of an example you’ve experienced, then, using the guidelines discussed in Chapter 5, find an example online. After describing your examples, discuss these two questions. What are some benefits to using integrated assessments? What are some disadvantages to using them?
Discussion 8
Creating strong integrated assessments can be difficult, but when implemented effectively they can be rewarding for teachers by informing them if students have met their expectations. Watch the video found in the Content area and explain how this classroom activity demonstrates an integrated assessment. Then, identify an assessment tool that could be used to evaluate students taking part in this Greek mythology project.
Curriculum Map Activity 3

You’re continuing to work on the final project. This week you’re constructing your rich culminating assessment and, similar to last week, it should align with the ideas in the reading for this week while also accurately reflecting your standards and essential questions. Along with describing your assessment, you should create a rubric that reflects the assessment description and communicates your expectations to your students.

These are the components:

  • List at least one relevant standard and essential question. Note: you can list more if your rich culminating assessment aligns with more than one standard and essential question.
  • Describe your rich culminating assessment in about 250 words. Make sure this assessment is thoroughly described and is comprehensive, multidimensional, and interdisciplinary. Also, it should clearly align with the standard and essential question.
  • Create an analytic rubric that reflects your assessment. This should contain at least three criteria, three scoring levels, and clear descriptors.
This assignment is worth 50 points and due by 11:59 p.m. CT on the Sunday of Week 4.
Week 5: Aligning Daily Lessons and Activities within a Unit
Readings
  • Drake: Chapter 6, Appendix A
  • Design Principles for New Systems of Assessment (via Stafford Library)
  • Web Resource: Performance Assessment Tasks
  • Video: Performance as a Culminating Activity
  • Review Instructional Materials
Discussion 9
Last week we discussed creating unit, or summative, assessments. This week we’re looking at filling in the unit with instructional activities and formative assessments. Choose one of the “performance assessment tasks” found on the web resource in the Content area. Then, create 3 activities and at least one formative assessment per activity you believe could be included to help students achieve success on that performance assessment. Discuss your rationale for the activities. In your response, state the grade and title of your assessment.
Discussion 10
Using the Performance Assessment Tasks website found in the Content area, choose a performance assessment task described by a classmate in discussion 7. Identify a gap and preconception with the material that a student might have with that content. Then provide a possible solution on what the teacher could do to help address that issue.
Curriculum Map Activity 4

This is the last assignment leading up to the final project. Here, you are describing the learning activities that will help lead up to your assessments. We’re going to focus on two standards with essential questions and assessment descriptions. Last week you created a rich culminating assessment. You can choose to use that one if you’d like, or you can create two complete new ones. Keep in mind that for your final project you’ll need to have a culminating assessment for each essential question, for a total of five. Along with creating the learning activities, you will also describe gap or preconceptions that might hinder students from learning during your activity.

This is what you need to create for this assignment:

  • Two listed standards, essential questions, and assessment descriptions.
  • Two activity descriptions, each one about 50-100 words that align with the standards, essential questions, and assessments. Keep in mind that these are not full lesson plans. You’re just describing the activity.
  • A thoroughly described gap or preconception for each activity. This too should be about 50-100 words.
This assignment is worth 50 points and due by 11:59 p.m. CT on the Sunday of Week 5.
Week 6: How Does Curriculum Mapping Benefits Schools?
Readings
  • A Case for Eliminating Curriculum Committees (via Stafford Library)
  • Video: What is Curriculum Mapping
  • Curriculum Mapping and Research-Based Practice (via Stafford Library)
  • Curriculum Mapping: Building Collaboration and Communication (via Stafford Library)
  • Review Instructional Materials
Discussion 11
Interview three education professionals, asking about their process for developing curriculum in their schools. Determine the steps they take or the systems they utilize. Do they use templates or other materials to streamline their process? Think critically about what questions you will ask and what information you need. Then synthesize and evaluate their process using the course readings and your own research.
Discussion 12
Share your nearly completed curriculum map with the three professionals you interviewed for this week’s other discussion and ask for their feedback. What did they think of your map? What was the most surprising piece of feedback? Reflect and react to their comments in this discussion post.
Reflection Paper 2

In your discussion board assignments for this week, you learned about the process for implementing curriculum and gathered feedback about your own integrated curriculum map. Based on the information you received, consider how you could implement your proposed curriculum map in one of those schools or districts. How could it benefit that school or district? What might be some hindrances to implementing your ideas?

Similar to the last reflection, this should be a minimum of 500 words and include references from the textbook and/or outside resources.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: How Can Technology Benefit Curriculum Mapping?
Readings
  • Web Resource: Teacher Collaboration in Curriculum Design Teams: Effects, Mechanisms, and Conditions
  • Web Resource: Collaborative Planning: Integrative Curricula Across Subjects
  • Web Resource: Collaborating in Google Drive to Grown an Instructional Framework for Literacy
  • Web Resource: Google Sheets Instruction Page
  • Review Instructional Materials
Discussion 13
Investigate how at least two districts have used collaborative software to present their curriculum maps. Then in your post, summarize how they use these tools and evaluate the process and the resources. What do you think districts could do differently? How should districts evaluate which collaborative resources to use?
Discussion 14
Post your draft curriculum map to the shared Google Sheets document and post a draft in this discussion board. Due to the unique nature of this discussion post, you do not need to post a 300 word response. Just include at least two 100 word minimum posts offering feedback to your classmates.
Curriculum Map Activity 5

This is your final curriculum map. It’s the culminating project that your previous assignments have led up to, so you can use the earlier components in constructing this one. Make sure you address any issues that have come up in previous assignments while also adding new elements as needed.

This is what you should include for your final curriculum map:

  • Subject/Topic listed
  • Five standards
  • Five essential questions
  • Rich culminating assessment for each essential question—only one rubric is required
  • Two activities for each essential question
  • One gap or preconception listed for each activity
This assignment is worth 50 points and due by 11:59 p.m. CT on the Sunday of Week 7.
Week 8: Next Step for Integrated Curriculum
Readings
  • Drake Epilogue: Curriculum Integration in the 21st Century
  • A Policy-Relevant Instrumental Case Study of an Inclusive STEM-Focused High School: Manor New Tech High (via Stafford Library)
  • Orchestrating a New Approach to Learning (via Stafford Library)
  • Review Instructional Materials
Discussion 15
In the chapter epilogue, Drake includes many links that exemplify her ideas. What online links would you include in this section? In your post, include two links and provide context describing how your links demonstrate 21st century curriculum integration.
Discussion 16

After reading the case study below, consider what you might do in Erica’s situation, based on your knowledge gained during the course and then post your advice for her. What activities and assessments might you incorporate into the curriculum? How do the readings and research reinforce your analysis? Then, consider at least two other classmates’ posts, and react to their evaluation. Do not simply agree with their analysis. Either help justify their evaluation or provide contrasting elements.

Erica has five years of teaching experience, but she is starting a new position at Columbia Middle School (CMS). At her old school, she mostly taught the standards and did not deviate too much from those. At CMS, she has been asked to teach a course focused on real-world applications of science. She was encouraged by her principal to use technology and integrate the course with other subjects while also aligning her course to the state standards. She is excited to teach this new course, but understands it will be a challenge to keep students engaged with exciting activities while also covering the required standards. At the same time, she wants to make her expectations clear and communicate those effectively to her students and their families.
Reflection Paper 3
Now that you’ve completed your course map, reflect on the work that you have completed. What are some ways that you can use this map in your own classroom? If you had more time, what other aspects of the map would you expand or change? How could you include technology to help deliver or communicate the ideas in this map? How could this process of backwards design help you develop additional curricular units? What might be some hindrances to using this process? What are some follow up procedures to consider after creating a unit through this method in order to make sure it is successful? In a 500 word minimum paper with references from the textbook, course readings, and/or outside resources, consider these questions and feel free to include others aspects that connect to the course content and readings.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted. Late Dropbox assignments will be accepted up to 1 week past the due date, but a 10% penalty will be imposed per day that the assignment is late. After 1 week, no late assignments will be accepted.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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