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Online classes

Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

ECON 293: Macroeconomics

Course Description

Introduction to concepts and theories applicable to a national economy. Course meets Multicultural graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Miller, Roger LeRoy. (2017). Economics Today (Complete)–With Myeconlab. (19th ed). New Jersey: Pearson.
    • [ISBN-978-1-323-82764-2]
    • Note: This course uses a VitalSource ebook. If you wish to have a print book, it can be ordered as a loose-leaf print on demand book through VitalSource. Please note there is a cost for this, and financial aid book vouchers cannot be used for this purchase. Once orders are placed, it can take approximately 5-7 business days for you to receive your print on demand book.

MyEconLab

The ebook comes with an access code for MyEconLab which is where the electronic homework for this course is performed. We utilize many of the available resources including videos, podcasts, animations (narrated interactive PowerPoints), web links and homework assignments. These features can found on a chapter-by-chapter basis once you have processed access to MyEconLab.

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Welcome to Macroeconomics Online!

It is hard to improve upon this overview of economics in general from an online article on Schools of Economic Thought provided to the world by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco:

The word "economics" is derived from “oikonomikos,” which means skilled in household management. Although the word is very old, the discipline of economics as we understand it today is a relatively recent development. Modern economic thought emerged in the 17th and 18th centuries as the western world began its transformation from an agrarian to an industrial society.

Despite the enormous differences between then and now, the economic problems with which society struggles remain the same:

  • How do we decide what to produce with our limited resources?
  • How do we ensure stable prices and full employment of our resources?
  • How do we provide a rising standard of living both for ourselves and for future generations?

Economics is thus a study of human efforts to promote and conserve standards of living. This study involves understanding of the production, exchange, distribution, and consumption of the goods and services that are possible given resources and technology. The study of economics may be undertaken from a macro perspective of overall economic activity or a micro perspective of individual decision making in typical households, businesses, or governmental units.

This is a course in macroeconomics. The objective of the course is to provide some provisional answers to the following questions. What is the "economy?"  How do markets and government function to address fundamental problems caused by scarcity? How are general standards of living conceptualized, formulated and measured?  How are we to explain the (sometimes severe) fluctuations in living standards? What are the major public policy alternatives for dealing with these fluctuations, and what are their relative costs and benefits? Our study of macroeconomics will involve economic measurement, theory, and policy analysis which address these questions.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Define economics, differentiate between microeconomics and macroeconomics, and explain the goals of an economic system.
  2. Explain the major institutions of capitalism; distinguish among pure capitalism, pure socialism, and mixed economic systems; describe the U.S. and other economies as they relate to these three economic forms.
  3. Describe the role of government in the U.S. economy; analyze the functions of government; explain the concepts of fiscal and monetary policy and how these tools of government policy are used.
  4. Describe the major components of GDP, including consumption, investment, government, and net exports; explain and analyze the factors that impact each of these components of aggregate spending.
  5. Describe and explain the banking system, including the role of commercial banks and the Federal Reserve and describe the way in which money is created in our economy.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (5) 200 20%
Dropbox Assignments (4) 200 20%
MyEconLab (8) 200 20%
Exams (2) 400 40%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 40 Thursday/Sunday
Dropbox 1: Economic Systems 50 Sunday
MyEconLab 1 25
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 40 Thursday/Sunday
MyEconLab 2 25 Sunday
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Dropbox 2: Unemployment 50 Sunday
MyEconLab 3 25
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 40 Thursday/Sunday
MyEconLab 4 25 Sunday
Midterm Exam 200
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Dropbox 3: Classical and Keynesian Macroeconomic Analyses 50 Sunday
MyEconLab 5 25
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 40 Thursday/Sunday
MyEconLab 6 25 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Dropbox 4: Monetary Policy 50 Sunday
MyEconLab 7 25
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 40 Thursday/Saturday
MyEconLab 8 25 Saturday
Final Exam 200
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Readings

Complete all assigned weekly readings prior to submitting assignments or taking quizzes for the week so the concepts covered can inform your work.


Discussions

Discussion posts and responses should be completed after the assigned readings. Read the overview in the Content area each week for detailed guidance. Failure to read this lead posting is the single most common reason for lower grades. Collaboration and interaction are encouraged, but points are not given for mere chat -- please reserve that for the General Discussion topics of the course. 

Once you’ve made your initial post in response to the prompt, respond to a minimum of three of your fellow classmates’ postings. Initial discussion postings are due by 11:59 pm CT Thursday and responsive posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday in each respective week except in Week 8, when they are due by 11:59 pm CT Saturday. Discussions are worth 40 points each.


Dropbox Assignments

Dropbox assignments are drawn from the text and outside research. They should be completed after the week’s reading assignment so that the lessons can inform one’s work and demonstrate mastery of the concepts covered. This sequence will also enable the instructor to provide feedback, which may be helpful in performing the latter assignments. Dropbox assignments are worth 50 points, assigned on the basis of percent of completeness, correct concept analysis, spelling, and grammar.

In many cases, students draw from the text and the resources in MyEconLab to complete the dropbox assignment. Students must cite all references, including the textbook. If a student’s answer references a source other than the text, the student should cite this reference according to the APA or Chicago Manual of Style. The use of any secondary reference without providing citation is plagiarism and will receive a score of 0. Also, work done in a previous course, in whole or in part, is regarded as plagiarism and will not be accepted.  Repeated incidents of plagiarism are reported to the Academic Affairs Office and the student receives an “F “grade in the course.

The preferred format to submit dropbox assignments is Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx). If these formats are not available, other acceptable formats are ASCII (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), and Open Office (.odt). Submit the Dropbox assignment in one document via the appropriate week’s dropbox by 11:59 pm CT Sunday, except in Week 8 when they are due by 11:59 pm CT Saturday.


MyEconLab Homework

Each week, there will be between 25 questions to complete in MyEconLab (http://www.myeconlab.com/). There are 8 MyEconLab modules, one for every week, worth 25 points each. Each module will open on Monday and close on the following Sunday at 11:59 pm CT except for Module 8 which will close on Saturday. A student has two attempts at every homework problem. There is no time limit and problems for each week may be accessed multiple times. Upon submission, results will be automatically scored and immediately available for viewing. Detailed results of submissions, including correct and incorrect answers, will be made available for viewing only after the deadline for submission has passed. Students are encouraged to use the text (paying particular attention to “key graphs”) and the resources in MyEconLab accompanying the text as resources.

Each student is responsible for observing the rules regarding academic honesty noted above in regard to homework on MyEconLab. 

Homework Answers Submitted in Error: The advantage of two attempts at each question comes with a cost. Once an answer is finally submitted, those answers are unchangeable. If the student erroneously checks a wrong selection or superimposes or misaligns their answer electronically from what they had intended, the answer is deemed to be the student’s final answer for that attempt. The student assumes all responsibility for submitting their intended choices.

Make-up MyEconLab assignments are allowed only for exceptional circumstances as detailed in the Late Assignments Policy.


Midterm and Final Exams

There will be a midterm and final exam, each consisting of 50 multiple choice questions, worth 200 points each. These exams are designed to facilitate the learning and application of economic concepts as well as assess student progress toward the goals and objectives of the course. Both exams are open book and taken online, without a proctor and under the assumption that the student has read this syllabus in general, and the section on Academic Honesty in particular.

Exams will open on Monday and close on Sunday at 11:59 pm CT during the week in which they occur, except in Week 8 when the Final will close at 11:59 pm CT on Saturday. The Midterm is assigned during Week 4 and the Final Exam during Week 8. Make-up examinations are allowed only for approved reasons and excused absences.

Note: You will have exactly 240 minutes to complete this exam.  If you log out, the time will continue to run. You are responsible for your own answers and allowed only one final submission. Upon submission, the results will be automatically scored and thus immediately available for review in the "Grades" section. Detailed results of submissions, including correct and incorrect answers, will be made available for viewing only after the deadline for submission has passed.

Exams submitted in error: The advantage of open-note exams comes with a cost. Once an exam is submitted, those answers are unchangeable. If the student erroneously checks a wrong selection or superimposes or misaligns their answer electronically from what they had intended, the answer is deemed to be the student’s final answer. The student assumes all responsibility for submitting their intended choices.

Exams not submitted: The submission of an exam is a function performed by the student when clicking the “submit” button in the module. If a student tries to send their responses via e-mail to the instructor, D2L or the Technology Solutions Center (http://web.ccis.edu/Offices/TechnologyServices/Support.aspx), this is deemed “not submitted” and receives a score of 0. Because each student is given seven (7) days to submit the Mid-Term Exam and six (6) days to submit the Final Exam, “My ISP is down,” or “my computer broke,” or “the website is slow,” are never valid excuses to not submit an exam.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: The Nature of Economics, Scarcity, Demand and Supply
Readings
  • Chapter 1: The Nature of Economics
  • Appendix A: Reading and Working with Graphs
  • Chapter 2: Scarcity and the World of Trade-Offs
  • Chapter 3: Demand and Supply
Discussion 1

Please introduce yourself and at least one famous Economics Major. Please do not duplicate your fellow students' introductions in that effort. Post to the “Week 1: Welcome and Introductions” topic found in the Discussions area. Your initial post is due Thursday at 11:59 pm CT. Responses are due by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT. Respond to a minimum of three of your classmates' postings.

Dropbox 1: Economic Systems

Write a short (2-3 page, typed and double-spaced,) essay and upload it to the Week 1 dropbox by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT. Write a thorough analysis of the three basic economic questions along with an analysis of the centralized command and control system, the price system, and the mixed economic system. Remember to cite your research and do not plagiarize.

MyEconLab 1

Click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link on the course home page. Click on the MyEconLab All Assignments link. Select MyEconLab 1 and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Optional Assignment

To enhance your understanding of Macroeconomics click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link and then click on MyEconLab All Assignments. Select Dynamic Study Module 1.

Week 2: Demand and Supply Analysis, Public Spending and Public Choice, and the Public Sector
Readings
  • Chapter 4: Extensions of Demand and Supply Analysis
  • Chapter 5: Public Spending and Public Choice
  • Chapter 6: Funding the Public Sector
Discussion 2

Identify the various taxes governments utilize to fund the public sector and the impact of those taxes on both the producer and the consumer. Respond to a minimum of three of your classmates' postings. Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT Thursday. Responses are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

MyEconLab 2

Click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link on the course home page. Click on the MyEconLab All Assignments link. Select MyEconLab 2 and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Optional Assignment

To enhance your understanding of Macroeconomics click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link and then click on MyEconLab All Assignments. Select Dynamic Study Module 2.

Week 3: Unemployment, Inflation, Deflation, and Measuring Economic Performance
Readings
  • Chapter 7: The Macroeconomy: Unemployment, Inflation, and Deflation
  • Chapter 8: Measuring the Economy's Performance
Dropbox 2: Unemployment

Write a short (2-3 page, double-spaced, typed) essay and upload it to the Week 3 Dropbox by the deadline of Sunday at 11:59 pm CT. Write a thorough analysis of unemployment, defining the various types of unemployment, full employment, and the natural rate of unemployment. Describe the impact of unemployment on the economy and your solutions to lower unemployment. Remember to cite your research and do not plagiarize.

MyEconLab 3

Click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link on the course home page. Click on the MyEconLab All Assignments link. Select MyEconLab 3 and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Optional Assignment

To enhance your understanding of Macroeconomics click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link and then click on MyEconLab All Assignments. Select Dynamic Study Module 3.

Week 4: Economic Growth and Real GDP
Readings
  • Chapter 9: Global Economic Growth and Development
  • Chapter 10: Real GDP and the Price Level in the Long Run
Discussion 3

Present a thorough analysis of economic growth. What are the factors that contribute to economic growth? Provide your perspective as to what our society can do to enhance economic growth. Respond to a minimum of 3 of your classmates' postings. Your initial post is due by Thursday at 11:59 pm CT. Responses are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

MyEconLab 4

Click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link on the course home page. Click on the MyEconLab All Assignments link. Select MyEconLab 4 and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Optional Assignment

To enhance your understanding of Macroeconomics click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link and then click on MyEconLab All Assignments. Select Dynamic Study Module 4.

Midterm Exam

This exam covers the first four weeks of the course (Chapters 1-10 of your text). The exam consists of 50 multiple-choice questions and is worth 200 points. A detailed description and instructions are available in the Quizzes area under Midterm Exam. The exam is open book, does not have a proctor and will only remain open from Monday to 11:59 pm CT Sunday. Answers are recorded by clicking on the one best selection of the multiple choices. You are responsible for your own answers and allowed only one final submission. You will be able to see your score immediately upon submission, but not the correct answers until the deadline for submission has passed. You will then be able to return to the exam and compare your answers with the correct answers by clicking on the exam, then "Submissions," and "Attempt 1" following the submission deadline.

Week 5: Classical and Keynesian Macro Analyses, Consumption, Real GDP, and the Multiplier
Readings
  • Chapter 11: Classical and Keynesian Macro Analyses
  • Chapter 12: Consumption, Real GDP, and the Multiplier
Dropbox 3: Classical and Keynesian Macroeconomic Analyses

Write a short (2-3 page, typed, double-spaced) essay and upload it to the Week 5 Dropbox by 11:59 pm CT Sunday. Conduct a thorough analysis of both the classical economic model and the Keynesian economic model. Describe the impact on the aggregate demand and supply curves, along with the impact on inflation and unemployment. Remember to cite your research and do not plagiarize.

MyEconLab 5

Click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link on the course home page. Click on the MyEconLab All Assignments link. Select MyEconLab 5 and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Optional Assignment

To enhance your understanding of Macroeconomics click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link and then click on MyEconLab All Assignments. Select Dynamic Study Module 5.

Week 6: Fiscal Policy, Deficit Spending and the Public Debt
Readings
  • Chapter 13: Fiscal Policy
  • Chapter 14: Deficit Spending and the Public Debt
Discussion 4

Present a thorough analysis of fiscal policy. Detail the effects of discretionary fiscal policies, the various policy levers, the impact of crowding out, time lags, and automatic stabilizer. Respond to a minimum of three of your classmates' postings. Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT Thursday Responses are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

MyEconLab 6

Click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link on the course home page. Click on the MyEconLab All Assignments link. Select MyEconLab 6 and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Optional Assignment

To enhance your understanding of Macroeconomics click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link and then click on MyEconLab All Assignments. Select Dynamic Study Module 6.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Money, Banking, Central Banking, and Monetary Policy
Readings
  • Chapter 15: Money, Banking, and Central Banking
  • Chapter 16: Domestic and International Dimensions of Monetary Policy
Dropbox 4: Monetary Policy

Present a thorough analysis of monetary policy. Detail the key factors that influence the quantity of money that people desire to hold, the policy actions taken by the Federal Reserve, and the equation of exchange. Remember to cite your research and do not plagiarize.

MyEconLab 7

Click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link on the course home page. Click on the MyEconLab All Assignments link. Select MyEconLab 7 and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Optional Assignment

To enhance your understanding of Macroeconomics click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link and then click on MyEconLab All Assignments. Select Dynamic Study Module 7.

Week 8: World Economy and Global Economic Growth
Readings
  • Chapter 17: Stabilization in an Integrated World Economy
  • Chapter 18: Policies and Prospects for Global Economic Growth
Discussion 5

Present a thorough analysis of the inverse relationship between inflation and unemployment reflected by the Phillips curve. Describe the importance of expectations and how they affect the actual relationship between the inflation rate and the unemployment rate. Respond to a minimum of three of your classmates' postings. Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT Thursday. Responses are due by 11:59 pm CT Saturday.

MyEconLab 8

Click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link on the course home page. Click on the MyEconLab All Assignments link. Select MyEconLab 8 and complete the problems. The problems for this week will open on Monday and close at 11:59 pm CT Saturday.

Optional Assignment

To enhance your understanding of Macroeconomics click on the Pearson's MyLab and Mastering link and then click on MyEconLab All Assignments. Select Dynamic Study Module 8.

Final Exam

The Final Exam will be cumulative, covering all 8 weeks of the course (chapters 1-18 of the text). The exam consists of 50 multiple-choice questions and is worth 200 points. A detailed description and instructions are available in the Quizzes area under Final Exam. The exam is open book, does not have a proctor and will remain open from Monday to 11:59 pm CT Saturday. You are responsible for your own answers and allowed only one final submission. You will be able to see your own score immediately upon submission, but not the correct answers until the deadline for submission has passed. You will be able to return to the exam and compare your answers with the correct answers by clicking on the exam, then “Submissions,” and then “Attempt 1” following the submission deadline.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

The Late Assignment Policy operates on the assumption that submitting assignments is the student’s responsibility.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Dropbox Assignments that are late may be turned in for partial credit. That is, all late dropboxes receive a late penalty of six points. No late dropboxes will be accepted (i.e. graded) two weeks after original assigned week closes nor after the course has ended. All dropboxes must be uploaded in the D2L module for the appropriate week. The instructor will not accept dropboxes via e-mail.

My EconLab assignments that are late may be completed for partial credit. That is, all late My EconLab assignments will receive a late penalty of three points. Late My EconLab assignments will only be accepted up to one week after the original assigned week closes. Subsequent submissions will receive no credit, unless approved by the instructor.

Exams are scheduled for weeks four and eight. Once that week has passed the opportunity to take the exam expires. The one exception is for a documented emergency, such as a medical condition.  If an emergency can be shown, make-up credit will be allowed once approved by the instructor and the emergency circumstances have been confirmed.

Once the course has ended the opportunity to earn points terminates.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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