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Online classes

Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

CISS 242: Programming II

Course Description

This course introduces more advanced steps to program design and is a continuation of CISS 241. A disciplined approach to problem solving and algorithm development will be stressed using top-down design. Topics include strings, pointers, recursion, classes, and methods, and operator overloading.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CISS 241

Proctored Exams: Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Gaddis, Tony. Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures Through Objects. 8th. Addison Wesley, 2015.
    • ISBN-978-0-13-376939-5
      • Note: This text comes with an access code to supplementary resources. These resources are optional, and are not required for course completion.

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

This class is the second in a three-course sequence, a continuation of CISS 241, introducing computer programming using the C++ language.  This class uses the C++ programming language, but the principles learned and skills obtained are applicable to programming in any language.  In fact, one of the objectives of this course is to instill the ability to transfer your knowledge and skills to programming in any domain, with any language.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

We will be using the Microsoft Compiler for this class, available at http://www.microsoft.com/express/vc/. Follow the online help to install the compiler. It may require you to install the .NET framework, which is also free.   

Course Objectives

  • To extend the language constructs and programming techniques available to the student
  • To use arrays, both one- and multi-dimensional
  • To work with strings and pointers, write simple recursive functions, and understand encapsulation using the object-oriented paradigm

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Declare and initialize one- and two-dimensional arrays.
  • Pass arrays as parameters to function.
  • Understand and implement a class.
  • Understand, use and define constructors with or without initializer list.
  • Understand and create destructors.
  • Understand and explain the difference between public and private members.
  • Understand, use and write get and set methods.
  • Understand, use and write static members.
  • Understand, use and write constant methods.
  • Understand the use of a pointer in a method.
  • Understand and provide class support for constant objects.
  • Understand and write friend functions.
  • Understand and write friend classes.
  • Understand and write overloaded operators.
  • Show how to overload the stream insertion operator to print a Name object.
  • Write a destructor for the class.
  • Given objects N1 and N2 of the Name class, write one or more class methods that would support the following syntax: if (N1 < N2 ) ? if (N1 < “Marry Sue” ) ? if (“Marry Sue” < N1) ?

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 720-800 90-100%
B 640-719 80-89%
C 560-639 70-79%
D 480-559 60-69%
F 0-479 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussion 75 9%
Programming Assignments 350 44%
Course Project 35 4%
Quizzes 140 18%
Final Exam 200 25%
Total 800 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Week 1 Programming Assignment 1 25 Sunday
Week 1 Programming Assignment 2 25
Quiz 1 20
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Week 2 Programming Assignment 1 25 Sunday
Week 2 Programming Assignment 2 25
Quiz 2 20
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Week 3 Programming Assignment 1 25 Sunday
Week 3 Programming Assignment 2 25
Quiz 3 20
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Week 4 Programming Assignment 1 25 Sunday
Week 4 Programming Assignment 2 25
Quiz 4 20
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Week 5 Programming Assignment 1 25 Sunday
Week 5 Programming Assignment 2 25
Quiz 5 20
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Week 6 Programming Assignment 1 25 Sunday
Week 6 Programming Assignment 2 25
Quiz 6 20
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Week 7 Programming Assignment 1 25 Sunday
Week 7 Programming Assignment 2 25
Quiz 7 20
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 5 Wednesday/Saturday
Course Project 35 Saturday
Final Exam 200
Total Points 800

Assignment Overview

Readings

Be sure you can answer all of the Checkpoint questions as well as complete the Review Questions and Exercises at the end of each chapter.


Discussion

Each week you will discuss programming concepts with your classmates. The discussion board will be used primarily for you to pose and answer questions about your programming assignments.  Regular participation in these forums will advance your understanding (as well as improve your grade). The first 7 weeks each student is required to post two times. First the student will post to the discussion topic that is provided each week by the instructor. The second post for every student is a response to a post by another student. NOTE: the first posting by the student must be posted by Wednesday of each week (start of discussion); if posted after Wednesday it will be subject to the late policy for this course. The response to another student’s posting is due by Sunday. Your responses to others’ posts should be well developed, fully explaining your response to the classmates’ posts. Make responses that add to the conversation and take it further; simply posting “I agree” or “good job” does not help develop ideas. For Week 8 there is only one post required; this post should be in response to the topic provided by the instructor.


Quizzes

There will be a brief 20-point quiz each week to test your understanding of programming concepts.


Programming Assignments

Each week you will write two programs; the requirements for these assignments are provided below in the Course Schedule section of this syllabus. We will be using the Microsoft Compiler for this class, available at http://www.microsoft.com/express/vc/

The Microsoft compilers are the more accepted tools in the field. Follow the online help to install the compiler. It may require you to install the .NET framework, which is also free. Complete your assignments in the Microsoft compiler; then submit the program to the course Dropbox.  Please include comments describing the programming sequence (see rubric in course content area).


Course Project

This assignment can be started anytime during Week 7 and must be submitted by the end of Week 8.  This project will use many the topics covered during this course.


Final Exam

You will have one (1) proctored exam worth 200 points. You must arrange an acceptable proctor and submit the Proctor Information Form to the Proctor Dropbox by the end of Week 2. See the Proctor Policy in the Course Policies section below for more information.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Searching and Sorting Arrays
Readings
  • Chapter 8.  Be sure you can review all of the Checkpoint questions.
  • Read the "Source Code Format and Comments" document available from the course website.
Discussion 1

A big part of programming is understanding the problem you are trying to solve. Lots of times the customer (external or internal to your company) may tell you what they want but at a very high level. Or they may tell you what problem they have. Either part of a programmer’s job is to figure out what they are looking for; sometimes you tell them what they want. It all comes down to software requirements—talk about different ways to determine requirements or the importance of requirements.

Pose your questions about programming issues encountered this week and answer those of your classmates.

Programming Assignments

The following assignments must be completed with all source code files, including .cpp and .h (.h files only needed when working with classes), submitted to the correct Dropbox by the end of the week.

Week 1 Programming Assignment 1

Lottery Winners: Write a program that determines if the user is a winner in the lottery game. A lottery ticket buyer purchases 10 tickets a week, always playing the same 10 5-digit “lucky” combinations. The program will initialize an array with these numbers and then lets the player enter this week’s winning 5-digit number. The program should perform both a linear search and a binary search through the list of player’s numbers and report whether or not one of the tickets is a winner this week. Here are the numbers, and the array must be created with the values in this order: 13579, 62483, 26791, 77777, 26792, 79422, 33445, 85647, 55555, 93121. NOTE: The numbers are not in order, they must start this way. 

Week 1 Programming Assignment 2

This program will be a modification of the program done in CISS 241, Week 7 Programming Assignment 1. That was the Rainfall Statistics program. For those who did not take 241, that program description is below. Modify the Rainfall Statistics program so that it displays a list of months, sorted in the order of rainfall from highest to lowest.

Original Assignment: Write a program that lets the user enter the total rainfall for each of 12 months into an array of doubles. The program should use two 12 element arrays. One array will hold strings, the names of the 12 months. This array will be initialized when the array is created using an initialization list (could also be created as a array of constants). The second array will hold doubles which will be the total rainfall for each month. The program will prompt the user for the rainfall for each month (using both arrays) and store the value entered into the array with the rainfall totals, the other is used to display which month the program is asking for the rainfall total. The program should display the following once the data is all entered:

  • The total rainfall for the year
  • The average monthly rainfall
  • The month with the highest amount of rainfall (must display the month as a string)
  • The month with the lowest amount of rainfall (must display the month as a string)

The program must have the following functions:

  • double getTotal(double [ ], int);
  • double getAverage(double [ ], int);
  • double getLowest(double [ ], int, int&); //returns the lowest value, provides the index of the lowest value in the last parameter.
  • double getHighest(double [ ], int, int&); //returns the highest value, provides the index of the highest value in the last parameter.
Quiz 1

Take the weekly quiz in the course environment.

Week 2: Pointers
Readings
  • Read Chapter 9.  Be sure you can review all of the Checkpoint questions as well as complete the Review Questions and Exercises.
Discussion 2

Pointers to a lot of people seem to be an odd thing, why would you use them? Well I want you to answer that question, why do we need pointers? Where would they be used? What do they provide to programming? In other words provide information to support the use of pointers.

Pose your questions about programming issues encountered this week and answer those of your classmates.

Programming Assignments

The following assignments must be completed with all source code files, including .cpp and .h (.h files only needed when working with classes), submitted to the correct Dropbox by the end of the week.

Week 2 Programming Assignment 1

Write a program that dynamically allocates an array large enough to hold a user-defined number of test scores. Once all the scores are entered by the user, the array must be passed to a function that sorts them in ascending order. It must use another function that calculates the average score. The program should display the sorted list of scores and average with appropriate headings. The program must use pointer notation instead of array notation.  Validation: Do not accept negative numbers for test scores; keep prompting the user for a new grade. Do not accept negative numbers for the number of scores the user wants to enter. The output should look like this:

Score

67.40

67.80

77.60

99.60

Average Score: 78.10

Program must have the following functions

  • void getGrades(double* score, int size)
  • void displayGrades(double* score, int size, double avg)
  • void sort(double* score, int size)
  • double average(double* score, int numScores)
Week 2 Programming Assignment 2

Array Expander: The program should have an array of integers. It will have a function that has two parameters, the integer array and the array’s size. This function will create a new array that is twice the size of the arguments array. The function should copy the contents of the argument array to the new array, and initialize the unused elements of the second array with 0. The function must return a pointer to the new array. The program will then display the contents of the new array.

Program must have the following functions:

  • int* expandArray(int[ ], int)
  • §void showArray(int [ ], int)
Quiz 2

Take the weekly quiz in the course environment.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Characters, Strings, and the String Class
Readings
  • Read Chapter 10.  Be sure you can review all of the Checkpoint questions as well as complete the Review Questions and Exercises.
Discussion 3

Testing of software is also a big part of programming. You will find programmers who do not like testing. But testing is a very important part of the software development process. How else would you know if what you wrote is correct? Some students should talk about White box testing, others about Black box testing.

Pose your questions about programming issues encountered this week and answer those of your classmates.

Programming Assignments

The following assignments must be completed with all source code files, including .cpp and .h (.h files only needed when working with classes), submitted to the correct Dropbox by the end of the week.

Week 3 Programming Assignment 1

Password Verifier: Here you will be creating part of a bigger program. Your task is to develop code that will verify the password the user is selecting meets the requirements of a password for the system. Create a program which will verify that a password meets the following criteria:

  • The password should be at least 6 characters long.
  • The password should contain at least one uppercase and at least one lowercase letter.
  • The password should have at least one digit.

If the password does not meet these requirements, the program should display a message telling the user why the password is invalid, specifically.

Program must have the following functions

  • bool validatePassword(char [ ]) – True if valid password, false otherwise.
Week 3 Programming Assignment 2

Phone Number List: This program should have an array of at least 10 string objects. The array will hold people’s names and phone numbers. The following list is an example of the data in the array.

     "Renee Javens, 678-1223",

      "Joe Looney, 586-0097",

      "Geri Palmer, 223-8787",

      "Lynn Presnell, 887-1212",

      "Bill Wolfe, 223-8878",

      "Sam Wiggins, 486-0998",

      "Bob Kain, 586-8712",

      "Tim Haynes, 586-7676",

      "John Johnson, 223-9037",

      "Jean James, 678-4939",

      "Ron Palmer, 486-2783"

The program should ask the user to enter a name or partial name to search for in the array. Any entries in the array that match the string entered should be displayed. For example, if the user enters “Palmer” the program should display the following names from the list:

Geri Palmer, 223-8787

Ron Palmer, 486-2783

NOTE: if the user enters “Pal” it should produce the same output.

Quiz 3

Take the weekly quiz in the course environment.

Week 4: Structured Data
Readings
  • Read Chapter 11.  Be sure you can review all of the Checkpoint questions as well as complete the Review Questions and Exercises.
Discussion 4

Provide input about Unit Testing and Integration Testing.

Pose your questions about programming issues encountered this week and answer those of your classmates.

Programming Assignments
The following assignments must be completed with all source code files, including .cpp and .h (.h files only needed when working with classes), submitted to the correct Dropbox by the end of the week.
Week 4 Programming Assignment 1

Corporate Sales Data: This program will have a structure that holds data about each division of a corporation. This structure will have a string object that holds the division’s name, 4 doubles that hold the sales totals for each quarter. The structure will also have two other doubles, one for the annual sales and the other will hold the average of the quarter sales. The program should use four variables (instances) of this structure. Each variable should represent one of the following corporate divisions: East, West, North, South. The user should be asked for the four quarters’ sales figures for each division. Each division’s total and average sales should be calculated and stored in the appropriate member of each structure variable. The output of the program will be all the figures in the structures. Validation: Do not accept negative numbers for any sales figures.

Program must have the following functions

  • void DisplayCorpInformation(const Division& east, const Division& west, const Division& north, const Division& south);
  • void FindTotalAndAverageSales(Division& div);
  • void GetDivisionSales(Division& div);

Refer to course content area for input and output screenshots.

Week 4 Programming Assignment 2

Soccer Scores: Write a program that stores the following data about a soccer player in a structure: Player’s name, Player’s number, Points scored by Player. The program should keep an array of 12 of these structures. Each element is for a different player on a team. The program should ask the user to enter information for each player. It should then display a table that lists each player’s number, name and points scored. The program should also calculate and display the total points earned by the team. The program should also determine which player earned the most points on the team and display that player’s information.  Validation: Do not accept negative values for player’s number or points scored.

Program must have the following functions

  • void getPlayerInfo(Player &);
  • void showInfo(Player);
  • int  getTotalPoints(Player [], int);
  • void showHighest(Player [], int);

Refer to the course content area for input and output screenshots

Quiz 4

Take the weekly quiz in the course environment.

Week 5: Advanced File Operations
Readings
  • Read Chapter 12.  Be sure you can review all of the Checkpoint questions as well as complete the Review Questions and Exercises.
Discussion 5

Provide input about System testing and System integration testing; these are two different things.

Pose your questions about programming issues encountered this week and answer those of your classmates.

Programming Assignments

The following assignments must be completed with all source code files, including .cpp and .h (.h files only needed when working with classes), submitted to the correct Dropbox by the end of the week.

Week 5 Programming Assignment 1

File Display Program: Write a program that asks the user for the name of a file. The program should display the content of the file on the screen. If the file’s contents won’t fit on a single screen, the program should display 24 lines of the output at a time, and then pause. Each time the program pauses, it should wait for the user to strike a key before the next 24 lines are displayed. 

Week 5 Programming Assignment 2

Punch Line: Write a program that reads and prints a joke and its punch line from two different files (please keep it clean). The first file contains a joke, but not its punch line. The second file has the punch line as its last line, preceded by “garbage text” (does not matter what it is).  NOTE: the last sentence (punch line) will have a newline character before it. The program is to search for the start of the last sentence; it should NOT move backward from the file a fixed number of characters. It should work for any punch line file. The main function of your program should open the two files and then call two functions, passing each one the file it needs. The first function should read and display each line in the file it is passed (the joke file). The second function should display only the last line of the file it is passed (the punch line file). IT should find this line by seeking to the end of the file and then backing up to the beginning of the last line. Data to test your program can be found in the joke.txt and punchline.text files provided at the textbook web site.

Program must have the following functions

  • void displayAllLines(ifstream &infile);  //Display joke
  • void displayLastLine(ifstream &infile);  //Display punchline
Quiz 5

Take the weekly quiz in the course environment.

Week 6: Introduction to Classes
Readings
  • Read Chapter 13.  Be sure you can review all of the Checkpoint questions as well as complete the Review Questions and Exercises.
Discussion 6

Provide input about Regression testing and Acceptance testing.

Pose your questions about programming issues encountered this week and answer those of your classmates.

Programming Assignments
The following assignments must be completed with all source code files, including .cpp and .h (.h files only needed when working with classes), submitted to the correct Dropbox by the end of the week.
Week 6 Programming Assignment 1

Employee Class. Write a class named Employee, with the class declaration in a file called Employee.h and the implementation in a file called Employee.cpp. The class should have the following data members:

  • name – A string that holds the employee’s name
  • idNumber – An int variable that holds the employee’s ID number
  • department – a string that holds the name of the department where the employee works
  • position – A string that holds the employee’s job status

The class must have the following constructors:

  • A constructor that accepts the following values as arguments and assigns them to the appropriate member variables: employee’s name, employee’s ID number, department and position.
  • A constructor that accepts the following values as arguments and assigns them to the appropriate member variable: employee’s name, employee’s ID number. The department and position fields should be assigned an empty string (“ “).
  • A default constructor that assigns empty string (“”) to the name, department and position member variables and 0 to the idNumber member variable. 

Write the appropriate mutator functions that store values in these member variables and accessor functions that return the values in these member variables. Once you have written the class, write a separate program that creates 3 instances of the Employee class. Each instance of the class should use a different constructor than the other 2 objects (so all three constructors must be used). Main should use a function called displayEmployee that has one parameter which is a pointer to a constant Employee object. Main will call the function 3 times to display the information for each of the 3 instances of the Employee class. 

void displayEmployee(Employee* const e);

The output of the program must be in the form of a table.

Week 6 Programming Assignment 2

Circle Class: Write a class name Circle, with the class declaration in a file called Circle.h and the implementation in a file called Circle.cpp. The class will have two data members, a double that holds the radius of the circle and a double called pi which will be set to the value, 3.14159 (data member cannot be set in the class declaration, pi should not be set via a parameter but set in the constructor). The class must provide the following member functions

  • Default Constructor – that sets the radius to 0.0
  • Constructor that accepts the radius of the circle as an argument
  • setRadius – a mutator function for the radius variable
  • getRadius – an accessor function for the radius variable
  • getArea – calculates and returns (as double) the area of the circle using the formula
    • area = pi * radius * radius
  • getDiameter – calculates and returns (as double) the diameter of the circle using the formula
    • diameter = radius * 2
  • getCircumference – calculates and returns (as double) the circumference of the circle using the formula

    • circumference = 2 * pi * radius

Write a program that demonstrates the Circle class by asking the user for the circle’s radius and creating a Circle object and then reporting the circle’s area, diameter and circumference. Two objects need to be created each using one of the two constructors (showing that both work along with the mutators and accessors).

Quiz 6

Take the weekly quiz in the course environment.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Classes (cont'd)
Readings
  • Read Chapter 13.  Be sure you can review all of the Checkpoint questions as well as complete the Review Questions and Exercises.
Discussion 7

Object Oriented Programming or OOP: We now know about structures and classes. Both of these are known as objects once an instance of them is created. But what makes a language object oriented? Not all languages are object oriented. 

Pose your questions about programming issues encountered this week and answer those of your classmates.

Programming Assignments
The following assignments must be completed with all source code files, including .cpp and .h (.h files only needed when working with classes), submitted to the correct Dropbox by the end of the week.
Week 7 Programming Assignment 1

Payroll: Write a class name Payroll, with the class declaration in a file called Payroll.h and the implementation in a file called Payroll.cpp. The class will have data members for an employee’s hourly pay rate, number of hours worked and total pay for the week. All of the data members will be doubles. The class only needs one constructor which can be a default constructor that sets all data members to zero. Then add the mutators and accessor for the class. The program will have an array of 7 Payroll objects. The program will prompt the user for number of hours each employee has worked and will then display the amount of gross pay each has earned. Before asking the user for the hours, the program should set the pay rate for each employee without user input. Validation: Do not accept values greater than 60 for the number of hours worked. 

Week 7 Programming Assignment 2

Cash Register: This program will use two classes; one of the classes is provided in the assignment description for week 7 in the course site. Write a class name CashRegister, with the class declaration in a file called CashRegister.h and the implementation in a file called CashRegister.cpp. This class will interact with the InventoryItem class that has been provided. The program should display a list of items that are available to purchase.

The program will ask the user for the item and quantity being purchased. It will then get the cost of the item from the InventoryItem object. It will add 30% profit to the cost of the item to get the item’s unit price. It will then multiply the unit price times the quantity being purchased to get the purchase subtotal. The program will then compute a 6% sales tax on the subtotal to get the purchase total. It should then display the purchase subtotal, tax and total on the screen. The program will then subtract the quantity being purchased from the onHand variable of the InventoryItem class object. InventoryItem will need to be modified to handle this.

Validation: Do not accept a negative value for the quantity of items being purchased. 

Quiz 7

Take the weekly quiz in the course environment.

Course Project

This project can be started in Week 7 but is due by the end of Week 8.  See the course project document in the course Content area.

Week 8: Rest, Recover, and Review

This week will be reserved for catching up on any assignments, discussing any topics or issues that have arisen, and preparing for the final.  The final may be taken any time this week, but MUST be taken by Saturday.

Discussion 8

So what is it about a class that helps make C++ an object oriented language? 

Pose your questions about programming issues encountered this week and answer those of your classmates.

Course Project

This project can be started in Week 7 but is due by the end of Week 8. See the course project document in the course Content area.

Final Exam

You will have 2 hours for the exam, which must be taken with a proctor.  See the Proctor Policy in the Course Policies section below for information about finding an appropriate proctor.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Late assignments will not be accepted.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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