Skip to main content

Search Bar Icon Close Menu

Online classes

Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

MUSI 122: Music Appreciation

Course Description

A musical appreciation course focusing on European and American works since 1500. G.E.

Prerequisite: None

Proctored Exams: Midterm



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Kerman, Joseph and Tomlinson, Gary . Listen. Eighth Edition with 6 CD set. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2015.
    • ISBN-978-1-324-00084-6

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

This course is an introduction to classical music, which may also be referred to as art music, Western music, or music of the Western tradition. The term classical implies something that has passed the test of time and has set the standards by which we judge, evaluate, and appreciate newer creations, ideas, and styles. Anything can be classic: a car, a movie, or even a person. This course is the study of music that has been admired, revered, and held in high esteem for some time.

Our method of study is to go back in the history of music to the earliest written compositions and discover what motivated people to write and listen to music in the first place. Western music has the advantage over other cultures of having been preserved in a written format, whereas most other cultures are dominated by an oral tradition that is passed down from generation to generation by word of mouth, often through complex ceremonies. For the most part, music of the Western tradition can identify specific composers and compositions who are considered representative of individual eras and stylistic time periods. Although the reasons for composing music have changed over the centuries, it is important to keep in mind this music was written by our ancestors, not by aliens from a different solar system.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the music and thought of the major style periods of music history. We will begin with the Medieval (450-1450) period to provide a background in which to view the course, then continue with Renaissance (1450-1600), Baroque (1600-1750), Classical (1750-1800), Romantic (1800-1900), and Twentieth Century music (ca. 1900 to the present).

At the end of this course you should be able to recognize the styles of these various musical periods through the music compositions studied, know the most important terminology and musical genres associated with each period, and be familiar with the lives and compositional styles of the major composers representing each period. Finally, you will discover this is a course in which you spend much of your time reading the textbook and listening to the recordings. Fortunately, the textbook is well written and the recordings are well done.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office
  • A working sound-card or integrated audio (headphones recommended)

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To acquire pertinent historical information.
  • To understand basic music terminology and notation.
  • To develop critical listening skills.
  • To be familiar with important, representative examples of classical music from all style periods.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Identify the elements and vocabulary of music for mastery of discussion of music of all styles.
  • Make judgments and critical observations about musical works based on the elements and concepts of music: pitch, melody, rhythm, timbre, harmony, musical texture, musical form, notation, tempos and dynamics.
  • Identify various musical instruments and ensembles: strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, and vocal.
  • Articulate basic understanding of the historical periods of music, including the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionism, Twentieth Century, and Postmodern.
  • Describe the role of music within historical, artistic, and cultural traditions.
  • Recognize the styles of each of the historical periods by aurally identifying standard masterpieces.
  • Be familiar with technical aspects of selected pieces: orchestration, instrumentation, form, and musical texture.
  • Appreciate the creative process of music by demonstrating familiarity of the lives and styles of individual composers.
  • Describe and explain performance practice: playing, singing, and conducting.
  • Develop skills of aesthetic judgment and critical thinking through music listening in class.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (14) 280 28%
Essays (2) 200 20%
Quizzes (6) 150 15%
Midterm (1) 185 18%
Final (1) 185 18%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 20 Thurs/Sun
Discussion 2 20
Quiz 1 25 Sunday
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 20 Thurs/Sun
Discussion 4 20
Quiz 2 25 Sunday
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 20 Thurs/Sun
Discussion 6 20
Quiz 3 25 Sunday
Essay 1 100
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 20 Thurs/Sun
Midterm Exam (Proctored) 185 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 20 Thurs/Sun
Discussion 9 20
Quiz 4 25 Sunday
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 10 20 Thurs/Sun
Discussion 11 20
Quiz 5 25 Sunday
Essay 2 100
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 12 20 Thurs/Sun
Discussion 13 20
Quiz 6 25 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 14 20 Thurs/Sat
Final Exam 185 Saturday
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Your initial discussion post should be at least two full paragraphs in length but no more than four paragraphs.  A discussion, in order to be a true discussion, requires some interaction among the members of the class. You are expected to respond to at least two other students. Each response should be at least a paragraph. Submit your initial post by Thursday at 11:59 pm CT. Submit two thoughtful response posts by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT, except for Week 8 when they are due by Saturday at 11:59 pm CT. Note that you will be required to post your initial response before you can read and respond to others' posts.

 

Present enough detail that you feel you are adding to the development of the discussion. Short responses such as “I agree” will not be given credit. Provide specific examples to illustrate your points from your textbook readings and listening examples.  Demonstrate that you are listening to the music and understanding the work within the historical context presented in the textbook. Discussions that mention the music examples always get a higher score than those that do not mention the listening examples at all. Always refer to the listening examples by title and composer; if you think it is useful, add the CD number and track listing.

 

Add your own personal perspective to the discussion by providing your personal reactions to the music.  For instance, you could describe your impressions when you listened to a specific example for the first time.  Have you heard this type of music before, in a church service, in a movie, or in some alternative music style?  Does the music sound strange and haunting, or somehow familiar?

 

There is no “correct” answer to the discussion question.  I am interested in what you learned from doing this assignment, your reaction to the music, your knowledge of the composers who wrote these pieces, and your understanding of the historical setting of the compositions and the characteristics of the music that constitutes its style.   Limit quotations to 2 or 3 sentences in any discussion. Professional writing standards apply to all written portions of the course; proofreading and use of the spell check feature in D2L are expected.


Essays

There will be two essays, Essay 1 due in Week 3 and Essay 2 due in Week 6. Document your essays with MLA references to the textbook, assigned listening exercises, and course discussions. Include a reference list.  Your essay will be checked for plagiarism. Keep directly quoted and paraphrased material to an absolute minimum.  I want to read about your understanding and reaction to the music. Your essay should be 750-1500 words. Please put your name and the word count in the header of your essays.  Submit your essays to the appropriate Dropbox by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of Week 3 and Week 6.

Listening to your chosen compositions on the CD set a few times as you prepare to write these essays will definitely help you formulate your responses. Reviewing the relevant discussions posted by other students in the discussion forums can also be quite helpful when you are deciding what to write about. Make these essays enjoyable for yourself by choosing to write about compositions and composers you found the most interesting and engaging.


Quizzes

There will be 6 quizzes in this course in Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7. Quizzes, worth 25 points each, will consist of 10 listening and 40 reading multiple-choice questions covering the assigned reading and listening materials. Quizzes should be completed by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT of each week (except exam weeks 4 and 8).

The purpose of the quizzes is to help you comprehend the textbook readings; consequently, it is more of a tool for learning than a method of evaluation.  For this reason, there is no time limit and quizzes may be taken multiple times. You will receive the highest score earned.


Exams

There will be a proctored Midterm Exam worth 185 points in Week 4 and a Final Exam worth 185 points in Week 8.

The Midterm Exam will cover the reading and instructional materials from Weeks 1 - 4. It will consist of about 50 multiple-choice questions. The Midterm Exam must be taken in a proctored setting. (Please see the Proctor Policy for more information.) You will have two hours to take the exam. The exam is due Sunday by 11:59 pm CT.

The Final Exam will cover the reading and instructional materials from Weeks 5 - 8. It will consist of about 50 multiple-choice questions, including some listening questions. It is not proctored. You will have two hours to take the exam. You will likely not have time to look up the answers, so be prepared.The exam is due Saturday by 11:59 pm CT.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Fundamentals of Music
Readings

Introduction: To the Student, pp. xxx-xxxiii

How to Use this Book, pp. xxxiv-xxxvii

Chapters 1 - 5

Study the Goals for Review at the end of each chapter.

Study the Listening Examples on the Unit 1 Companion CD (found in the back of the textbook). [The listening examples for the remainder of the course are on the 6 CD set accompanying the textbook]. Students using the eBook will find all the listening examples for each Chapter online at the Digital Resources companion website.

Discussion 1
Introduce yourself.  Please give us more than your name. Include your profession, hobbies, interest in music, and any musical background you may or may not have. Let's get to know each other.  Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Discussion 2
What has been your experience with classical music? What does "classical" mean to you? Do you enjoy listening to classical music? If so, do you have a favorite song or composer? Start by carefully reading “Introduction to the Student” on pages xxv-xxix, and then write a two to four paragraph discussion post. Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Quiz 1
This quiz covers Chapters 1 - 5 and should be completed by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT.
Week 2: Early Music: An Overview
Readings

Chapters 6 - 7

Study the Goals for Review at the end of each chapter.

CD Listening Examples: Tracks 1 - 14 and 28 - 31 on Disk 1

Discussion 3
The principal genres of the Middle Ages are a reflection of the lifestyle of the church and court of the time. These music genres include: plainchant, secular songs and dances of the troubadours, Notre Dame organum, and ars nova motets.  Describe the two basic characteristic features of plainchant.  Listen to one of the plainchant recordings and try to imagine yourself as a medieval monk or nun in prayer and contemplation during a religious observance for which it was written.  After listening to the plainchant of your choice, ask yourself whether chant is prayer or music.  When discussing the plainchant of your choice, mention the title of the chant and composers’ names in your post.  Contrast your experience of listening to a plainchant with that of listening to the music at court.  Support your opinion with direct evidence from the text and listening.  Please post your initial post by Thursday and your two response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Discussion 4
The principal genres of the Renaissance reflect new attitudes toward the sounds and expressive possibilities of music. How is this new attitude represented in the new Renaissance genres?  Choose one or two listening examples; your choices of genre include the Mass, motet, madrigal, and Renaissance dances. Read what the textbook has to say about the music, listen to music, and imagine yourself in a Renaissance setting.  How is the music you are now listening to in the Renaissance era different from the music you listened to in the medieval era?  As always, in your discussion mention the title of composition(s) and the name of composer(s) you are considering.  Support your opinion with direct evidence from the text and listening.  Please post your initial post by Thursday and your two response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Quiz 2
This quiz covers Chapters 6 - 7 and should be completed by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT.
Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: The Baroque Period
Readings

Chapters 8 - 11

Study the Goals for Review at the end of each chapter.

CD Listening Examples: Tracks 15-27 and 32-33 on Disk 1 and Tracks 1-13 on Disk 2.

Discussion 5
Opera developed, almost overnight, in the early Baroque period. Its monumental size, lavish sets, stages, and costumes make it the most extravagant genre in the history of early music. As our textbook states, “Opera was a perfect answer to the general desire in the early Baroque era for individual emotionalism.” Two operatic conventions developed out of this desire: the recitative and the aria. After reading pages 87 to 94, choose one of the operas, by either Claudio Monteverdi or Henry Purcell, and describe how your listening experience corresponds to the description of aria and recitative found in the textbook. Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Discussion 6

The rise of purely instrumental music during the late Baroque period illustrates how the stylistic elements of Baroque music became developed enough to create a viable musical statement on their own.  Using Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 5, first movement, as your point of reference, can you hear absolutism, science, and theatricality in music?  After listening to the recording example, while following the listening chart in the textbook on p. 125 discuss:

1. How does the grand scale of the work (its length and size of ensemble) relate to absolutism?

2. Why can Bach’s use of the same few melodic ideas in a formulaic ritornello form be compared to the scientific method?

3. Do the vivacious, engaging quality of the solo themes played by the violin, flute, and harpsichord contrast enough with the constantly repeating, predictable ritornellos of the orchestra to create a theatrical spectacle? Consider the showy virtuosity of the harpsichord cadenza that concludes the composition. 

Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Quiz 3
This quiz covers Chapters 8 - 11 and should be completed by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT.
Essay 1

Choose one option from the prompts below.

  1. What are the important genres of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance? Mention the names of some of the important composers and the titles of their compositions from each era. Next, describe the technical and stylistic aspects of at least one composition from each era. Tell me about the usage of each piece. For example, is the work secular or sacred?
  2. The Baroque era was a period of development and innovation in the field of music. Give a detailed description of three music genres that developed during this time period.Describe the stylistic characteristics of these new Baroque music genres as well as the names of composers and titles of compositions that represent them.The Baroque genres you can write about include opera, oratorio, cantata, organ chorale, concerto, and concerto grosso.
Week 4: Music and the Enlightenment
Readings

Chapters 12 - 14

Study the Goals for Review at the end of each chapter.

CD Listening Examples: Tracks 14-41 on Disk 2.

Discussion 7
Classical style is a reflection of the Enlightenment ideals of “pleasing variety” and “natural simplicity.”  The standardization of musical forms and genres of the Classical music era offered a means by which complex music could be readily perceived and appreciated.  Describe how the predictability offered by the structure of sonata form could give the impression of “natural simplicity.”  Next, study the beige listening charts describing Franz Joseph Haydn’s Symphony No. 99.  How does Haydn’s establishment of a standardized Classical four-movement symphony accommodate the Enlightenment’s ideal of “pleasing variety”?  Do you hear this “pleasing variety” of music as you listen to the four movements of this symphony?  Listen to this symphony via the CD recording.  Support your answer with direct evidence from the text. Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Midterm Exam (Proctored)

The Midterm Exam will cover Chapters 1 - 14. It will consist of about 50 multiple-choice questions. The Midterm Exam must be taken in a proctored setting. (Please see the Proctor Policy for more information.) You will have two hours to take the exam. This will be a closed-book exam. You will not be able to use your text or other references or notes during the exam. The exam is due Sunday by 11:59 pm CT.

Week 5: The Nineteenth Century
Readings

Chapters 15 - 17

Study the Goals for Review at the end of each chapter.

CD Listening Examples: Tracks 42 - 45 on Disk 2 and Tracks 1 - 33 on Disk 3

Discussion 8
Beethoven has been described as one of the greatest disruptive figures in the history of music. This understanding of Beethoven’s place in music history is demonstrated by the fact that he is the only composer to have a whole chapter in our textbook solely dedicated to him. He is a product of both Classicism and Romanticism. What is Classical and what is Romantic in Beethoven's Fifth Symphony? Listen to the Fifth Symphony with the listening charts on pages 212 and 214 to help write your response. Compare the movements of Beethoven’s symphony with the movements of Haydn’s and Mozart’s symphonies using Listening Charts 7, 8, 9, and 10.  Support your answer with direct evidence from the text. Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Discussion 9
The spontaneity and individual expression of the Romantic period led to a change in the formal designs of music compositions resulting in miniatures, "grandiose" compositions, program music, and thematic unity. Discuss two compositions that represent these early Romantic tendencies, choosing from the works of Schubert, the Schumanns (both Robert and Clara), Chopin, and Berlioz. The choice of which two works to discuss is yours, but stay with the examples discussed in the text and found in the recordings.  Support your answer with direct evidence from the text. Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Quiz 4
This quiz covers Chapters 15 - 17 and should be completed by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT.
Week 6: Romantic Opera and the Late Romantics
Readings

Read Chapters 18 - 19

Study the Goals for Review at the end of each chapter.

CD Listening Examples: Tracks 1 - 43 on Disk 4

Discussion 10
Read about and listen to the selections from Verdi’s Rigoletto and Puccini’s Madame Butterfly.  Compare their Italianate idea of opera, with its beautiful melodies sung by beautiful voices, accompanied by a subordinate orchestra, with Richard Wagner’s musical drama The Valkyrie. Note that it uses a Germanic aesthetic of “a total work of art” (Gesamtkunstwerk) with artistic unity dependent on leitmotivs, rather than the traditional arias and recitatives.  Do you find the Italian approach to opera more pleasing and engaging, or is Wagner’s idea of unifying all the conventions of opera on an equal footing ultimately more powerful and more meaningful?  Whose style do you prefer? Explain how you came to your decision.  Support your answer with direct evidence from the text. Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Discussion 11
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky composed the Overture-Fantasy Romeo and Juliet following the outline of the original play in a very general way. In your own words describe the basic actions found in Tchaikovsky's programmatic overture. The listening chart on page 285 will definitely help you answer this question. What is the musical form of this work?  Support your answer with direct evidence from the text. Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Quiz 5
This quiz covers Chapters 18 - 19 and should be completed by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT.
Essay 2

Beethoven is the only composer to whom an entire chapter in our textbook is dedicated. Consequently, from a stylistic point of view we can conclude that: there is music before Beethoven, Beethoven’s music, and music after Beethoven. In Discussion 8 the class considered the Classical and the Romantic style traits found in all four movements of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony.  Choose one option from the prompts below.

  1. Which parts of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony are classically derived and which parts are romantically inspired? Start by comparing and contrasting how the sonata form is used by Beethoven as opposed to the sonata form in the earlier symphonies of the Classical composers, such as Haydn and Mozart. Next, briefly mention the classically and romantically inspired features of the final three movements of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony.
  2. How did composers like Schubert, the Schumanns, Chopin, Berlioz, Wagner, Verdi, or any of the Modern composers write music that was different than or similar to Beethoven’s musical style? Choose three composers who you found the most interesting to compare and contrast with Beethoven’s musical style.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Twentieth Century Music and Modernism
Readings

Chapters 20 - 22

Study the Goals for Review at the end of each chapter.

CD Listening Examples: Tracks 1 - 44 on Disk 5 and Tracks 1 - 2 on Disk 6.

Discussion 12

At the beginning of the twentieth-century, the confluence of rapid technological change, ongoing revelations in biological research, and development of new perspectives offered by psychology combined to formulate a new aesthetic described as Modernism.  Study pages 302-311.  Discuss how you see the traditional laws of physics, Biblical authority, and our understanding of psychology being questioned and challenged by the works of Einstein, Darwin, and Freud. Explain how the new found influences of modernism expressed themselves in music, art, and literature prior to World War I.  Look at the pictures of paintings by Braque (p. 305), Kandinsky (p. 307), and Picasso (p. 309) to get you in the spirit of writing your discussion.  Support your answer with direct evidence from the text. Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 13
What are some of characteristics that make the following composers modern: Claude Debussy, Maurice Ravel, Igor Stravinsky, Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg, Bela Bartok, Charles Ives, Ruth Crawford, William Grant Still, Aaron Copland, and Sergei Prokofiev? Choose any two of these composers and discuss them and their compositions found on the recordings. Remember to listen while following the charts in the textbook.  Support your answer with direct evidence from the text. Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Quiz 6
This quiz covers Chapters 20 - 22 and should be completed by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT.
Week 8: Reflections and Review
Readings
Review chapters 15-22 in preparation for the exam.
Discussion 14

Some twentieth-century composers reacted against modernism after World War I and seemed to revert to using what can be described as traditional elements of musical style.  These composers went back to using common practice tonality, established musical forms (such as sonata form, theme, and variations, rondo, etc.), and real melodies.  Listen to the recording examples of William Grant Still’s Afro-American Symphony, the fourth movement, and Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring.  After listening to these two pieces and reading about them in the textbook, explain what characteristics allow us to easily recognize these two works as being traditionally American in style.  Feel free to discuss both the music and the lives of the composers.  Mention any other traditional composers you enjoyed discovering in this chapter.  Support your answer with direct evidence from the text. Please post your initial post by Thursday and your response posts by 11:59 pm CT Saturday.

Final Exam
The Final Exam will cover Chapters 15 - 22. It will consist of about 50 multiple-choice questions, including some listening questions. You will have two hours to take the exam. The exam is not proctored. You will likely not have time to look up the answers, so be prepared. The exam is due Saturday by 11:59 pm CT.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No credit will be given for late assignments with the exception of documented deployment or documented illness.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


+

Request info