Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

HIST 362: History Of The American West

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  Course Description

Analysis of Western America from colonization to the present.  The course traces the imperial, commercial, intellectual and social relationships constituting the trans-Mississippi region.  In particular, it appraises the interactions of diverse populations in a frontier borderland over the course of several generations.  Furthermore, significant attention is given to territorial acquisition, population mobility, economic development and popular culture.

Prerequisite: Junior Standing

Proctored Exams: Midterm and Final



  Textbooks

As part of TruitionSM, students will receive their course materials automatically as described below.

Required

  •  Milner, C., Butler, A., and Lewis, D. R., eds. (1997). Major Problems in the History of the American West (2nd ed). St. Charles, IL: Houghton Mifflin.  Physical Book
  •  White, R. (1993). "It's Your Misfortune and None of My Own “: A New History of the American West (1st ed). Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press.  Physical Book
  •  Anderson, G. C., & Chamberlain, K. P. (2008). Power and Promise: The Changing American West (1st ed). New York, NY: Pearson/Longman.  Physical Book
  •  Rampolla, M. L. (2017). A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (9th ed). Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's Press.  eText

Bookstore Information

Ed Map is Columbia College’s bookstore for Online, Nationwide, and Evening students.

eText Information

If a course uses an eText, (see Textbook information above) the book will be available directly in Desire2Learn (D2L) and through the VitalSource eText reader the Friday before the session begins, if registered for courses prior to that date.  Students will have a VitalSource account created for them using their CougarMail email address. Upon first login to VitalSource, students may need to verify their account and update their VitalSource password.  More information about how to use the VitalSource platform, including offline access to eTexts, can be found in D2L.  Students that would like to order an optional loose-leaf print-on-demand copy of eligible eTexts can do so through the Ed Map storefront at an additional cost.  Once orders are placed, it can take approximately five to seven business days for students to receive their print-on-demand books.

Physical Course Materials Information

Students enrolled in courses that require physical materials will receive these materials automatically at the address on file with Columbia College.  Delivery date of physical materials is dependent on registration date and shipping location.  Please refer to confirmation emails sent from Ed Map for more details on shipping status.

Returns: Students who drop a course with physical course materials will be responsible for returning those items to Ed Map within 30 days of receipt of the order.  More specific information on how to do so will be included in the package received from Ed Map.  See here for Ed Map's return policy. Failure to return physical items from a dropped course will result in a charge to the student account for all unreturned items.

Note: Students who opt-out of having their books provided as part of TruitionSM are responsible for purchasing their own course materials.

  Course Overview

The American West is a place, or a series of places.  At the same time, it is a process, a concept, and a mythos.  You will be looking at the West in all these contexts, in order to understand its peoples, events, and roles in the broader history of the United States and the world. 

  • Frederick Jackson Turner, one of the first scholars to address the history of the West, cast it as a sort of rolling sequence of successive "frontiers," with fur traders followed by miners, followed by railroads, followed by...   Frontiers happened to Turner's West, but his West also shaped national institutions.  Turner's emphasis was on the advance of Euro-Americans from the United States in the East, but he paid less attention to the people already living in the West. 
  • Patricia Limerick, a founder of what has been called "The New Western History," has tried to understand and present what may be a more complex West, and her interpretations are grounded in what she calls "The Four Cs:" Conquest, Continuity, Convergence, and Complexity. 
  • Our course will rely heavily on a textbook by another New West historian, Richard White.  The book is sort of, but not entirely, chronological.  I think you'll like the way It's Your Misfortune and None of My Own makes connections and links between past and present. In addition, he treats the history of the American West in light of themes rather than a series of events. 

We will also be taking some virtual field trips each week, to augment the text and explore aspects of Western history that are especially important, or that White may have slighted. 

The links are an important component of the course because in many ways they reflect (and perhaps perpetuate) the mythos of the American West.  They are tours of various museums, the National Park System, and tourist locations websites. 

Each week you will need to take part in class activities by participating in what is called the "Class Discussion" with other class members and me.  In addition, you will be required to write a 10- to 12-page research paper.

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyze the relationship between westward expansion and the development of American politics, economics, and culture.
  2. Explain the impact of American western expansion on indigenous populations from the colonial period to the present day.
  3. Explain the historical development of the American West as a region and the mythology of that region.
  4. Analyze the contributions of diverse populations to the building of the American West.
  5. Analyze primary documents within a historical framework.

  Grading

Grading Scale

Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (25) 200 20%
Research Paper Outline Discussion 20 2%
Research Paper 180 18%
Midterm Exam 300 30%
Final Exam 300 30%
Total 1000 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion 8 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 1 8
Discussion 2 8
Discussion 3 8

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 8 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 5 8
Discussion 6 8
Research Paper: Topic Submission -- Sunday
Proctor Information N/A

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 8 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 8 8
Discussion 9 8

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 10 8 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 11 8
Discussion 12 8
Midterm Exam 300 Sunday

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13 8 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 14 8
Discussion 15 8
Research Paper: Outline Discussion 20

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 16 8 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 17 8
Discussion 18 8

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 19 8 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 20 8
Discussion 21 8
Research Paper: Submission 180 Sunday

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 22 8 Thursday/Saturday
Discussion 23 8
Discussion 24 8
Final Exam 300 Saturday
Total Points: 1000

  Assignment Overview

Discussions

The ability to analyze and academically discuss an issue is a key component to understanding history. Historians gain a further understanding of historical accuracy when they discuss and critically analyze their views with others. The discussion portion of the course provides you with an opportunity to discuss and challenge each other’s views of the assigned readings for the week.

Apart from the Introduction Discussion in Week 1, each week there will be three (3) questions/topics over the week’s reading assignments. You are required to answer each question with a 250-word minimum initial response and two peer post responses of 100 words each for the same question/topic. For each week, your original post for each question/topic is due by 11:59 p.m. CT, Thursday. Your responses to peer posts are due by 11:59 p.m. CT, Sunday for Weeks 1-7 and 11:59 p.m. CT, Saturday for Week 8. Each original post is worth 4 points and each of the two responses to peer posts is worth 2 points. You can receive a maximum of 8 points for each discussion question.

Each discussion is set so that you must post your original thoughts before reading the posts of your classmates. Your answers and responses must be written clearly, thoughtfully, and insightfully. Merely stating in your responses to fellow students that you agree or disagree is not considered a quality response, and will not be counted. Your answers and responses must show a familiarity with the reading assignments and a holistic understanding of the week’s topics by citing your sources and backing up what you say with evidence. Although you cannot receive more than 8 points for each question/topic, I will use extra comments in deciding borderline grades. See the grading rubric for more details regarding the assessment of discussion postings found in the Assignment Expectations. Please adhere to the guidelines of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Research Paper

By the end of Week 7, you will be required to submit a research paper based on the topic chosen by you and approved by the Instructor. The assignment is broken down into 3 components: Research Paper: Topic Submission, Research Paper: Outline Discussion, and Research Paper: Submission. The first two components are discussion activities while the third component has to be submitted in the appropriate Dropbox folder.

Research Paper: Topic Submission

During the first week of class, I would like you to consider a topic for your paper. You may choose your own topic; submit that topic to the instructor via the appropriate discussion board by 11:59 p.m. CT, Sunday of Week 2. In your Research Paper, you will need to critically analyze primary sources and research related secondary sources. Though this is not a graded activity, be sure to post your topic for instructor approval or your paper will not be accepted,

Research Paper: Outline Discussion

By Week 5, you are required to post an outline of the research paper along with the primary sources you intend to use to the appropriate discussion board. You must post your outline by Thursday, 11:59 p.m. CT, and respond to two (2) of your peers’ posts by Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT. Posting the outline is worth 15 points and 5 points are for two peer responses with suggestions on their paper and sources.

Research Paper: Submission

In your Research Paper, you will need to critically analyze primary sources and research related secondary sources.This assignment will not only provide the opportunity for you to take an in-depth look at a subject, but also provide you with the opportunity to improve your research and writing skills.

A quality paper is one that consists of the following:

  • A well-constructed thesis statement
  • A critical examination of primary sources
  • Consulted quality secondary sources
  • Well-constructed paragraphs
  • Proper use of language, spelling, and punctuation
  • 1-inch margins and lines that are double spaced
  • Uses the Chicago Manual of Style for documentation
  • A separate Bibliography page, which lists both the primary and secondary sources consulted

The research paper should be 10-12 pages and it should be about 2500-3000 words in a double-spaced font, such as Times New Roman, 12 points. Page total only applies to the text. Bibliographies, cover page, table of contents, or synopsis are not included. Also, you will use 4 primary and 6 secondary sources. Please be careful when using internet sources. Many of these are not good sources and are merely like Encyclopedias. They don’t tell much. However, this is not to say that internet sources are useless. You can refer to the Stafford Library guidelines for detailed information on this. Many historical journals are now online. Your best sources are those found in JSTOR through the Columbia College Stafford Library. Please see grading rubric in the Content area for grading criteria. The paper will be submitted through Turnitin.com to check for plagiarism. The Research Paper is due to the Dropbox by 11:59 p.m. CT, Sunday of Week 7 and it is worth 180 points. Please refer to the Resource Guide for help in locating good sources of information for your research on the History of the American West.

Exams

Historians like to test their knowledge and understanding of the past by engaging in examinations. You will be required to take two proctored exams – Midterm Exam and Final Exam. You must submit the “Student Proctor Information Submission Form” to the Proctor Information Dropbox by the end of Week 2. This form and additional information about Proctoring are located in the Content area of the course. Each Columbia College site has its own hours and methods for handling proctoring. Each exam is worth 300 points toward your final grade and the duration is two (2) hours. These two tests are an exercise to measure your ability to grasp the material that is being read, discussed, and analyzed. Each exam will consist of 25 multiple-choice questions (worth 2 points each), 10 short answer essays (worth 10 points each), and 3 long answer essay questions (worth 50 points each), and only one (1) attempt is allowed. The Midterm consists of questions from topics covered in Weeks 1 through 4. The Final consists of questions from topics covered in Weeks 5 through 8. The Midterm exam opens on Monday at 12:01 a.m. CT and it is due by 11:59 p.m. CT, Sunday of Week 4. The Final exam opens on Monday at 12:01 a.m. CT and is due by 11:59 p.m. CT, Saturday of Week 8.

  Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Readings
  • Milner, Butler, & Lewis
    • Chapter 1
    • Chapter 2
  • White
    • Chapter 1
    • Chapter 2
  • Anderson & Chamberlain
    • Chapter 2
Introduction Discussion

Introduce yourself and be sure to include your current job position and any personal information that you are willing to share to help us know you better. Also, please do a Google search on myths of the American West and read about one of them. Tell about this myth, including its reality and why this myth has become a part of the American West.

Discussion 1

In many ways, Chapter 1 of Milner's book is perhaps the most important assigned reading for the course, not for historical facts, but for historical interpretation. Frederick Jackson Turner's "frontier thesis" set the stage for historical interpretation of the American West. It seems that most historians have accepted, rejected, or revised it in some fashion. Either way, it is the starting point from which most historians depart.

Tell us what you see as Turner's main argument and discuss how historians have responded to this argument.  Pay particular attention to the statements and the essays by Nugent and Milner in Chapter 1 of Milner’s book.

Discussion 2

Contact between the Spanish and the Native Americans began many years before the 13 colonies in the East were formed.

Describe the Spanish conquests of the American West. What were their goals? What were some of the results?  Include in your discussion the primary documents regarding the Pueblo Revolt in Chapter 2 of Milner’s book.

Discussion 3

As the Spanish increasingly inhabited the American West between 1750 and 1850, several social, political, and religious changes took place.  What do you believe were the three most significant changes and why?  Be sure to include in your discussion, some specific points Richard White had on this subject.

Readings
  • Milner, Butler, & Lewis
    • Chapter 3
    • Chapter 4
    • Chapter 5
  • White
    • Chapter 3
    • Chapter 5
    • Chapter 6
  • Anderson & Chamberlain
    • Chapter 3
    • Chapter 4
    • Chapter 5
Discussion 4

There is no doubt that the federal government was deeply involved in the expanding West. Discuss the following: Did the early explorers (those between 1800 and 1850) eagerly want federal government support, or were they just tolerating it?  Be sure to include in your discussion quotes from the primary readings from Milner’s book.

Discussion 5

Discuss why the United States fought the Mexican-American War.

Discussion 6

Discuss in what ways the federal government was involved with distributing the western lands.  Be sure to include in your discussion, some specific points Richard White had on this subject.

Research Paper: Topic Submission

Post a topic of your choice for the Research Paper in the appropriate discussion board. You are required to submit the topic for instructor approval.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Readings
  • Milner, Butler, & Lewis
    • Chapter 6
    • Chapter 8
    • Chapter 9
  • White
    • Chapter 8
    • Chapter 10
    • Chapter 11
    • Chapter 13
  • Anderson & Chamberlain
    • Chapter 6
    • Chapter 8
Discussion 7

Why do you suppose the violence caused by the outlaws garnered so much notoriety in the second half of the nineteenth century, even though many of the well-known “killers” had very few, if any, killings?  Be sure to include in your discussion, some specific points Richard White had on this subject.

Discussion 8

Account for the growth of the railroad and mining industries in the American West. How did they fit into the world economy?  Be sure to include in your response information from the primary readings in Milner’s book.

Discussion 9

Racial and social conflicts seemed to pervade the American West. In fact, Milner stated in his Introduction to Chapter 8 that the American West was a “laboratory for political and social reform.” 

What do you see as the driving forces behind these conflicts? Be sure to include in your response information from the primary readings in Milner’s book.

Readings
  • Milner, Butler, & Lewis
    • Chapter 7
    • Chapter 10
  • White
    • Chapter 12
  • Anderson & Chamberlain
    • Chapter 8
Discussion 10

Discuss in what ways the West faced ethnic challenges.  Be sure to include in your discussion, some specific points Richard White had on this subject.

Discussion 11

Account for the patterns and changes of migration we see after 1850. What are the most significant challenges that the families faced? In what ways were gender norms shaped by western experience? Be sure to include in your response information from the primary readings in Milner’s book.

Discussion 12

Community building seemed a daunting task in the American West. What factors do you suppose contributed to complex community building in the American West? In what ways did the various ethnic groups deal with the situation? Be sure to include in your response information from the primary readings in Milner’s book.

Midterm Exam

The Midterm Exam covers the material from Weeks 1-4. It is a proctored exam and it will be available from Monday at 12:01 a.m. CT until Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT of Week 4. It is worth 300 points. The exam is an exercise to measure your ability to grasp the material that is being read, discussed, and analyzed. It will consist of 25 multiple-choice questions (worth 2 points each), 10 short-answer essays (worth 10 points each), and 3 long-answer essay questions (worth 50 points each).

You have two (2) hours to complete the exam in one (1) attempt.

Key topics that will be covered are:

  • Mexican Independence
  • Louisiana Purchase
  • Acquisition of Texas and Empresarios
  • Oregon Territory
  • Manifest Destiny
  • Tyler and Polk
  • Gadsden Purchase
  • Jackson and Removal of Natives
  • Reservation System and Change
  • Assimilation
  • The Homestead Act
  • Gold Rush
  • Kansas Territory
  • Railroad Expansion after the Civil War
  • Violence and Vigilantes
  • Community Development of the late 1800s
Readings
  • Milner, Butler, & Lewis
    • Chapter 11
  • White
    • Chapter 15
    • Chapter 16
  • Anderson & Chamberlain
    • Chapter 9
Discussion 13

Account for the growing involvement of the federal government and its bureaucratic movement in the American West. What are the Progressive legacies of this movement?

Discussion 14

Discuss the conservation-preservation debate that Milner brings out in Chapter 11. Based on the information provided in the readings for this week, which would you have supported during the early 20th century? Provide reasons for your support.

Discussion 15

In what ways does the National Reclamation Act or Newlands Act of 1902 represent the “pinnacle” of federal bureaucracy in the American West?  Be sure to include in your discussion, some specific points Richard White had on this subject.

Research Paper: Outline Discussion

You are required to post an outline of the research paper along with the primary sources you intend to use in the appropriate discussion board. Posting the outline is worth 15 points, and 5 points are for two peer responses with suggestions on their paper and sources.

Readings
  • Milner, Butler, & Lewis
    • Chapter 11
    • Chapter 12
  • White
    • Chapter 17
    • Chapter 18
  • Anderson & Chamberlain
    • Chapter 10
    • Chapter 11
Discussion 16

Describe the major projects of the New Deal in the American West.  In what ways did the New Deal reshape the western environment and the relationship with the federal government?  Be sure to include in your discussion, some specific points Richard White had on this subject.

Discussion 17

During World War II, several ethnic groups were targeted for conversion or detainment. What were the social, economic, and psychological impacts of relocation and internment? Be sure to include in your discussion information from the primary readings in Milner’s book.

Discussion 18

Discuss the ways in which the American West was industrialized during World War II. Be sure to include in your discussion information from the primary readings in Milner’s book.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Readings
  • Milner, Butler, & Lewis
    • Chapter 13
    • Chapter 14
  • White
    • Chapter 19
    • Chapter 20
  • Anderson & Chamberlain
    • Chapter 11
    • Chapter 12
Discussion 19

Since the end of World War II, the American West has seen tremendous growth in many of its major metropolitan areas.  Account for some of the ways in which these cities grew.  What was the role of the federal government in this growth?  Be sure to include in your discussion, some specific points Richard White had on this subject.

Discussion 20

Assess the arguments on both sides of the issue regarding the Sagebrush Rebellion. Be sure to include in your discussion information from the primary readings in Milner’s book.

Discussion 21

In what ways did the Civil Rights Movement impact the American West?  Be sure to include in your discussion information from the primary readings in Milner’s book.

Research Paper: Submission

By the end of Week 7, you will be required to submit a research paper based on the topic chosen by you and approved by the Instructor in Week 2. You will need to critically analyze primary sources and research related secondary sources.

This assignment will not only provide the opportunity for you to take an in-depth look at a subject, but also provide you with the opportunity to improve your research and writing skills.

Readings
  • Milner, Butler, & Lewis
    • Chapter 15
  • White
    • Chapter 21
  • Anderson & Chamberlain
    • Chapter 12
Discussion 22

Explain the shift in population centers from rural to urban.  How has this shift impacted rural small towns? Be sure to include in your discussion information from the primary readings in Milner’s book.

Discussion 23

In what ways do the actual American West and the imagined American West influence each other?  Be sure to include in your discussion, some specific points Richard White had on this subject and from videos like the Marlboro Man commercial.

Discussion 24

Do you agree or disagree with Anne M. Butler's essay in Chapter 15 of Milner's book?

Be sure to include in your discussion information from the primary readings in Milner’s book.

Final Exam

The Final Exam covers the material from Weeks 5-8. It is a proctored exam and it will be available from Monday at 12:01 a.m. CT until Saturday, 11:59 p.m. CT of Week 8. It is worth 300 points. The exam is an exercise to measure your ability to grasp the material that is being read, discussed, and analyzed. It will consist of 25 multiple-choice questions (worth 2 points each), 10 short-answer essays (worth 10 points each), and 3 long-answer essay questions (worth 50 points each).

You have two (2) hours to complete the exam in one (1) attempt.

Key topics that will be covered are:

  • Oil and water rights
  • Newlands Act
  • Dawes Act
  • Agricultural changes in the early 1900s
  • Race and migration in the west in the early 1900s
  • The New Deal in the west
  • John Collier
  • Japanese internment
  • Growth of the metropolitan west
  • Postwar recovery
  • Sagebrush Rebellion
  • AIM
  • Chicano culture
  • The imagined west

  Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a cumulative process that begins with the first college learning opportunity. Students are responsible for knowing the Academic Integrity policy and procedures and may not use ignorance of either as an excuse for academic misconduct. Columbia College recognizes that the vast majority of students at Columbia College maintain high ethical academic standards; however, failure to abide by the prohibitions listed herein is considered academic misconduct and may result in disciplinary action, a failing grade on the assignment, and/or a grade of "F" for the course.

Additionally, all required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted. Late work will not be accepted without prior authorization from me, and a grade penalty may apply regardless of the excuse.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.

  Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance.  If you have questions about the Ed Map storefront, please contact the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center.  If you have technical problems with the VitalSource eText reader, please contact VitalSource.  Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.