Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

HIST 321: History Of The Modern U.S.

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  Course Description

Analysis of the reformation of the United States during the era of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The course explores the story of how Americans endured the Great Depression and eventually prevailed in their struggle against totalitarianism. In particular, it highlights the anxieties of the new era, the stock market crash of 1928, the New Deal policies of FDR and the military campaigns of World War II. Significant themes of gender, class, power and warfare are traced from the twilight of the roaring twenties to the dawn of the atomic age. Offered Odd Fall.

Prerequisite: HIST 122

Proctored Exams: Final



  Textbooks

As part of TruitionSM, students will receive their course materials automatically as described below.

Required

  •  Bérubé, Allan. (2010). Coming Out Under Fire: The History of Gay Men and Women in World War II (2nd ed). Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press.  eText
  •  Gordon, Colin. (2011). Major Problems in American History, 1920-1945 (2nd ed). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.  Physical Book
  •  Kennedy, David M. (2001). Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945 (1st ed). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.  eText
  •  Miller, Nathan. (2004). New World Coming: The 1920s And the Making of Modern America (1st ed). Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press.  Physical Book
  •  Rampolla, Mary L. (2017). A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (9th ed). Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s.  eText

Bookstore Information

Visit https://www.ccis.edu/bookstore.aspx for details.

eText Information

If a course uses an eText, (see Textbook information above) the book will be available directly in Desire2Learn (D2L) and through the VitalSource eText reader the Friday before the session begins, if registered for courses prior to that date.  Students will have a VitalSource account created for them using their CougarMail email address. Upon first login to VitalSource, students may need to verify their account and update their VitalSource password.  More information about how to use the VitalSource platform, including offline access to eTexts, can be found in D2L.  Students that would like to order an optional print-on-demand copy of eligible eTexts can do so through the VitalSource bookshelf at an additional cost.  Once orders are placed, it can take approximately five to seven business days for students to receive their print-on-demand books.

Physical Course Materials Information

Students enrolled in courses that require physical materials will receive these materials automatically at the address on file with Columbia College.  Delivery date of physical materials is dependent on registration date and shipping location.  Please refer to confirmation emails sent from Ed Map for more details on shipping status.

Returns: Students who drop a course with physical course materials will be responsible for returning those items to Ed Map within 30 days of receipt of the order.  More specific information on how to do so will be included in the package received from Ed Map.  See here for Ed Map's return policy. Failure to return physical items from a dropped course will result in a charge to the student account for all unreturned items.

Note: Students who opt-out of having their books provided as part of TruitionSM are responsible for purchasing their own course materials.

  Course Overview

This course covers an incredible transformational time in U. S. history.  We will begin after the country has emerged from World War I, or the War to End all Wars and end with what has become known as the war of the Greatest Generation. The effects of that first war will bring to the nation a devil-may-care attitude during the Roaring 20s and will continue on as we move from an isolationist country suffering from the Great Depression to a nation moving towards a reluctant participant in WWII that will go on to become a world power.  Emerging from WWI the people of this country will see a change in the role of women, creating conflict between the defenders of the traditional way of life and the advocates of modernization.  We will also see a change in the relationship between the individual citizen and the government.  These changes will be explored with a focus on the social side of this history.

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyze the political and economic trends of the Republican ascendancy, 1920-1932.
  2. Analyze the causes of the Great Depression and the New Deal Response.
  3. Analyze LBGT issues in American society, 1920-1941.
  4. Analyze the World War II home front.
  5. Analyze race and class and gender in America from 1920 to 1945.

  Grading

Grading Scale

Grade Points Percent
A 720-800 90-100%
B 640-719 80-89%
C 560-639 70-79%
D 480-559 60-69%
F 0-479 0-59%

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (23) 230 29%
Research Paper (3) 270 34%
Book Review (1) 100 12%
Final Exam (1) 200 25%
Total 800 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion N/A Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 1 10
Discussion 2 10
Discussion 3 10

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 5 10
Discussion 6 10
Proctor Information N/A Sunday

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 8 10
Discussion 9 10
Research Paper: Part I 20 Sunday

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 10 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 11 10
Discussion 12 10
Book Review 100 Sunday

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 14 10
Discussion 15 10
Research Paper: Part II 50 Sunday

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 16 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 17 10
Discussion 18 10

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 19 10 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 20 10
Discussion 21 10
Research Paper: Part III 200 Sunday

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 22 10 Thursday/Saturday
Discussion 23 10
Final Exam 200 Saturday
Total Points: 800

  Assignment Overview

Discussions

Introduction Discussion 
In the first week of the course, you will write an ungraded introduction discussion post including any special interests you have in the study of history. You should also respond to at least one other student's introductions. This introductory discussion is intended to help you get to know your classmates. Submit the initial introduction post by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday of Week 1. Submit a response post to a classmate by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of Week 1. 
 
Weekly Discussions
There are 23 graded discussions in this course, worth 10 points each. This includes three discussions per week, except Week 8 when there are only two discussions. These discussions are intended to help you reflect on and apply the content covered each week. For each discussion, write one substantive post including examples from the readings or videos covered that week. Length is relative (some students can answer briefly while others take up more words), instead focus on providing a well thought-out post. Also, respond to at least one other student's post. The response should also have substantive content in order to move the conversation forward. Posts such as “good post,” “I agree,” and so on will not be accepted. All post should be written in Chicago-Style format as formatted in the Rampolla text. Cite all textbook resources, content videos and websites referenced in your posts. Submit the initial introduction post by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday of the assigned week. Submit a response post to a classmate by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of the assigned week, except Week 8 which is due by 11:59 pm CT on Saturday. No late discussions will be accepted. A detailed rubric is available in the content area of the course.  
 
"Must Post First" Requirement
You must submit your own original posts before you will be able to view your classmates’ posts. A complete, original post is expected at initial submission. This means that initial posts should not be edited, deleted and resubmitted, or otherwise altered after submission. Students who attempt to violate the “must post first” expectations may receive a zero for the discussion.

Book Review

There is one three-page book review in this course due in Week 4, worth 100 points. This includes a critical analysis of the Nathan Miller text, "New World Coming: The 1920s And the Making of Modern America." Submit the book review to the appropriate Dropbox folder by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of Week 4. Late book reviews will not be accepted, unless a verifiable excuse has been approved by your instructor PRIOR to due date. Additional information on what constitutes a book review and a detailed grading rubric are available in the content area of the course. 
 
Formatting
Follow the book review writing guidelines presented in Rampolla text, "A Pocket Guide to Writing in History." Cite all sources using Chicago-Manual style. The paper should be no less than three pages (not counting title page, end note page, or bibliography), double spaced with Times New Roman Font and one-inch margins.  

Conditional Release & Plagiarism
The Dropbox folder for the book review will not be available until you have reviewed the plagiarism tutorial AND taken the plagiarism quiz. All papers will be checked for plagiarism. Papers submitted to prior courses, including this course will not be accepted.

Research Paper

There is one research paper in this course, completed in three parts, worth 270 points total (34% of the course grade). This includes critical analysis of six primary resources and and one to two secondary sources to develop an 8-10 page paper relevant to the time frame of the course. Wikipedia is NOT an acceptable primary or secondary source. Additional information on the research paper components and detailed grading rubrics are available in the content area of the course. 
 
Sample topics include: 
  • The Roaring Twenties
  • Prohibition
  • Immigration
  • Response of the Republican answer to the Great Depression
  • The Great Depression
  • Relief programs of the New Deal
  • Life during the Great Depression
  • Isolationism in the Inter-war years
  • Propaganda during WWII
  • Race and/or Gender roles during WWII
  • The Role of Gay Men and Women in WWII       
Part 1 of the research paper, worth 20 points, including the paper topic, sources, and initial thesis must be submitted to the appropriate Dropbox folder by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of Week 3. 
 
Part 2 of the research paper, worth 50 points, including the outline, thesis revision, and main topic sentences must be submitted to the appropriate Dropbox folder by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of Week 5. 
 
Part 3 of the research paper, worth 200 points, including the critical anlysis, final draft, and biliography must be submitted to the appropriate Dropbox folder by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of Week 6. Late research paper assignments will not be accepted, unless a verifiable excuse has been approved by your instructor PRIOR to the due date.
 
Formatting
Follow the research paper writing guidelines presented in Rampolla text, "A Pocket Guide to Writing in History". Cite all sources using Chicago-Manual style. The paper should be 8 to 10 pages (not including title page, end note page, or bibliography), double-spaced with Times New Roman Font and one-inch margins.
 
Plagiarism
All papers will be checked for plagiarism. Papers submitted to prior courses, including this course, will not be accepted.

Final Exam

There is one proctored, comprehensive final exam in this course during Week 8, worth 200 points (25% of the course grade). This includes 20 short answer questions (worth 5 points each) and 4 essay questions (worth 25 points each) covering all the material covered in Weeks 1 - 8. You will have 2 hours to complete the exam. The exam opens at 12:01 am CT on Monday of Week 8 and must be submitted by 11:59 pm CT on Saturday of Week 8, the last day of the course. No late exams will be accepted. 
 
Proctor Information
The Student Proctor Information form and the instructions for selecting a proctor are available in the content area of the course. Proctor forms must be submitted by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of Week 2. 

  Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Readings
  • Gordon Documents: “Attorney General Palmer's Case Against the Reds;" The Cartoon "We Can't Digest the Scum;" “Babbitt” Sketches “Our Ideal Citizen;” "Herbert Hoover on American Individualism;" "W.E.B. Du Bois on the Meaning of the War for African-Americans;" and  “The Ku Klux Klan Defines Americanism”
  • Kennedy: Prologue
  • Miller: Introduction through Chapter 2
  • Rampolla Chapters 1-3: While there are no graded assignments for these readings, experience has shown that the knowledge gained from this textbook is essential for writing and formatting your research paper.
Multimedia
  • America’s Black Soldiers in WWI, For Love of Liberty Video
  • Harlem Hellfighters Homecoming WWI Video

Multimedia resources are located within each weekly Instructional Materials page, available in the Content area of the course. 

Introduction Discussion

To get started, tell the class something about yourself and any special interests you have in the study of history. Additionally, utilizing your favorite search engine, search for a historical event that happened on your birth date, any year, and post that event along with your introduction.

Discussion 1

Consider life in the United States between the end of WWI and the years leading to the early Roaring 20s.  After achieving a stunning success during WWI, what prompted the interim years of social tension? From your perspective, what issue (s) contributed the most to those overall feelings of tension?  Your Miller textbook covers several issues, so remember to bring specific examples from your readings to support your argument. Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 2

Read the documents from your Gordon text, and discuss what it meant to be an American, or to be perceived as American in the 1920s.  Does this perception ring true in the 21st Century?  Make sure to bring in supporting information from your documents to support your argument.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 3

Wilson took the U. S. to war to make the world safe for democracy, but with the rise of Communism in the new USSR, the new administration realized that did not come to fruition.  Utilizing your favorite search engine, type in the terms “Palmer Raids” and “Soviet Ark.” What were the Palmer Raids and the Soviet Ark? Who participated and who was affected by these events?   From your perspective, was the Red Scare a genuine concern for most Americans? Why or why not? Make sure to include specific supporting information from your search.  Cite all textbook and outside sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Readings
  • Gordon Documents:  Claude McKay, “If I Must Die;” and Langston Hughes, “Two Poems of the 1920s”
  • Miller: Pages 61-149; 199-271
Multimedia
  • Scopes Monkey Trial Video
  • The Jazz Age: Soap, Sex, Cigarettes and Prohibition Video
  • Nativism in the 1920s Video
  • The Rise and Fall of the 1920s Ku Klux Klan Video

Multimedia resources are located within each weekly Instructional Materials page, available in the Content area of the course. 

Discussion 4

Your readings have shown that the 1920s to early 1930s was a time of conflict between traditional thinking and new modern ways, taking place during the time of returning to a “normal” life. Discuss the contrast of the conflict between modernity and tradition in the areas of race, religion, immigration and the status of women.  From your perspective, was Harding’s promise of “Normalcy” achieved?  Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 5

African Americans came back from the war expecting equality since they fought to make the world safe for democracy.  After reading the three poems in your Gordon reading, summarize the individual poems and answer the question of whether or not the authors believed they had achieved that equality?  Then, if you had to choose one poem that best exemplifies the issues of race in the 21st Century, which poem would you choose and explain why? Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 6

Let’s take a look at the iconic phrase “The Roaring 20s”.  Using your favorite search engine, search out the terms “Jazz Age,” “Lost Generation,” “Harlem Renaissance” and “Flappers.” First, define and share your definition of these terms to gain a better understanding of their significance in the Roaring 20s.  From your perspective, what was the cause of this “Devil may care” attitude? Make sure to include specific supporting information from your search.  Cite all textbook and outside sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Readings
  • Gordon documents: “The Employer’s Case for Welfare Capitalism,” “Labor’s Case Against Welfare Capitalism,”  “The Automobile Comes to Middletown,” “Bruce Barton Sees Jesus as an Advertising Man,” “Herbert Hoover Reassures the Nation, 1931,” “Henry Ford on Unemployment and Self Help, 1932,” and “A Participant Recalls the Bonus Army March of 1932”
  • Kennedy: Chapters 1-3
  • Miller: Pages 149-197, 273-389
  • Rampolla: Chapters 5
Multimedia
  • Bonus Army Marches on Washington D. C. Part 1 Video
  • Bonus Army Marches on Washington D. C. Part 2 Video
  • Bonus Army Marches on Washington D. C. Part 3 Video

Multimedia resources are located within each weekly Instructional Materials page, available in the Content area of the course. 

Discussion 7

Your readings this week will lead you through a time of seemingly endless prosperity and will end with the beginning of the Great Depression.  Analyze and discuss the significance of the rise in automobile ownership and the impact it had on society.  What role did the automobile play in changing the American economy and society? Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations. 

Discussion 8

As you have seen from your reading, the boom years could not last.  Examine and discuss the existing signs that the economy was in danger of collapse.  What conclusions can you draw regarding the boom and bust of the economy? Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 9

After WWI, Congress promised the veterans a bonus to be paid in 1945.  Many of those veterans were out of work due to the Great Depression.  After watching the Bonus Army videos, discuss how that tragedy related to Hoover’s credibility and his ability to be reelected.  Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations. 

Research Paper: Part I

For this assignment, you will be submitting your research paper topic, identifying sources, and drafting a specific thesis.  Before you begin, review the Rampolla readings for developing a research paper. Next, select one of these general ideas and develop a focused and concise initial thesis. As Rampolla advises, select a topic that can sustain your interest over the course of the session. Rampolla recommends asking “a meaningful historical question that calls for analysis and interpretation, and that might elicit some debate.” Additional information on the research paper components and detailed grading rubrics are available in the content area of the course.

Readings
  • Gordon Documents: “Conditions in Rural America,” “Tenant Farmers Recall the Conditions of Sharecropping the 1930s,” “From a Dust Bowl Diary,” “A Farmer Recalls a “Penny Sale” of the 1930s,” “The Agricultural Adjustment Act, 1935,” “I Was a Burden,” “A Working-Class Woman on “Making Do” in the 1930s,” “Children Recall the 1930s,” “The Plight of the Unemployed in the 1930s,” “An Ordinary American Appeals to Her Government,” and “Roosevelt’s First Inaugural Address”
  • Kennedy: Chapters 4-7
  • Rampolla, Chapter 3
Multimedia
  • President Roosevelt’s First Inaugural Address Video
  • The 1930s: Surviving the Dust Bowl Video
  • FDR's Tree Army: The Civilian Conservation Corps Video

Multimedia resources are located within each weekly Instructional Materials page, available in the Content area of the course. 

Discussion 10

Kennedy will lead you through the first one hundred days of the controversial president, Franklin D. Roosevelt.  He refused to show his hand to Hoover and the American people between his election and inauguration.  He promised a New Deal for the American people.  Review and outline both his relief and recovery measures during the first one hundred days.  Who benefited from each of those programs?  What conclusions can you draw from FDR’s efforts to bring about relief and recovery with the programs on which he focused in his first one hundred days in office?  Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 11

Your primary sources this week are bleak.  They do not paint a joyful picture of the Great Depression.  Analyze and discuss either the issues / plight of the farmer, or the lives of those individuals discussed in the second set of documents.   Do you find any similarities in their stories?  Why/why not? Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 12

As you know, many factors caused the Dust Bowl:  over-farming, poor crop science, drought, pestilence, etc.  After watching the Dust Bowl video, discuss your impression of the individual experiences.  Do you believe the government assistance was sufficient to help those living through this experience? Explain your reasoning using specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Book Review

The book review is a critical analysis of historical study. You are required to submit a review of the Nathan Miller text. Additional information on what constitutes a book review is located in the Content area. Your Rampolla textbook also offers guidance on pages 36-37.

Prior to submitting your book review, you will be required to take the Plagiarism tutorial and quiz, located in the Content area of the course. You are cautioned to review your own work. All papers will be checked for plagiarism. Papers submitted to prior courses, including this course, will not be accepted. Additional information on what constitutes a book review and a detailed grading rubric are available in the content area of the course.

Readings
  • Gordon: “Communists Lament the Futility of the New Deal, 1934,” “Huey Long and the Share Our Wealth Society,” “Father Coughlin Lectures on Social Justice,” “W.P. Kiplinger Argues Why Businessmen Fear Washington,” “What the Liberty League Believes,” “Herbert Hoover Comments on the New Deal,” and “Southern Democrats Erode the New Deal Coalition”
  • Kennedy: Chapters 8-12
  • Rampolla, Chapter 5
Multimedia
  • FDR’s Fireside Chat Video 7
  • New Deal – 1930s Government Promotional Part I Video
  • New Deal – 1930s Government Promotional Part II Video
  • Franklin Roosevelt Social Security Video
  • The Townsend Pension Plan in the 1930s Video

Multimedia resources are located within each weekly Instructional Materials page, available in the Content area of the course.

Discussion 13

This week, you will read in your Kennedy text about a “different kind of President.”  FDR’s numerous efforts in relief, recovery, and reform had not been seen in other presidents when it came to government intervention in American citizens’ everyday existence.  This week I would like you to explore the major short and long-term effects of the New Deal.  From your understanding, what do you believe to be the most important long-lasting effect on the American people and government?  Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 14

Many Americans have grown up believing FDR was the best U. S. president, simply because he worked so hard to get the U. S. out of the Great Depression. Your primary sources and multimedia this week are a collection of views from the other side as well as arguments for continuing efforts to get out of the Great Depression.  After reading and viewing the arguments against his programs, which argument is most valid in your opinion?  What was FDR’s answer to his opponents? Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 15

FDR would become the first and only president to win four elections.  Many began to worry that he was garnering too much power in government.  What was FDR’s response to the Supreme Court’s challenging of some of his New Deal policies such as the AAA and NRA?  Was he successful, and do you believe these actions tarnished his image with the American people?  Why or why not? Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Research Paper: Part II

For this assignment, you will create an outline of your research paper. The outline should reinforce the thesis statement you submitted in the Research Paper: Part I assignment submitted in Week 3. First, review the Rampolla readings about writing a research paper outline. Then, review your sources and draft your working thesis. Include three fully explained main ideas, with two supporting ideas for each main idea. Additional information on the research paper components and detailed grading rubrics are available in the content area of the course.

Readings
  • Gordon Documents: "A State Department Official on the Benefits of Disarmament," "Former Secretary of State Frank Kellogg on Avoiding War," “Secretary of State Cordell Hull Promotes Reciprocal Trade,” and "Charles Lindbergh on the Perils of War”
  • Kennedy:Chapters 13-15
Multimedia
  • Roosevelt, Good Neighbor Policy Video
  • Lend Lease (brief excerpts) Video
  • Segment from FDR’s Quarantine Speech Video (starting at 10:09)
  • Roosevelt "Four Freedoms" Speech Video

Multimedia resources are located within each weekly Instructional Materials page, available in the Content area of the course. 

Discussion 16

As we know, the United States fought in WWI to make the world safe for democracy.  It has been argued that the interwar years were simply a time out, that WWI and WWII were fought for similar issues.  With this thought in mind, the people of the United States did not want to enter into another international conflict.  As you read the required text this week, explore the protective bubble of American neutrality and isolationism in face of international (Asia and Europe) events. From your perspective, was that a defensible policy for both the American people and the government?  Why or why not?  Discuss what was happening in Europe and Asia, including the response of the American people as well as the different factions in government. Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 17

The authors in your Gordon text this week discuss differing reasons for staying away from international conflicts.  As you consider these reasons, which do you find more effective in arguing against war? Why? From your perspective, have any of these arguments stood the test of time?  Why or why not? Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 18

FDR was known to support the efforts of those fighting Fascism and Japanese nationalism.  This placed him in a precarious situation at the nation’s leader, but as you have read, he believed some action needed to be taken.  After viewing the videos this week, put yourself in the shoes of the common person in the 1930s witnessing the war in Europe and Asia. Which of the video excerpts would convince you to support actions in an effort to end the war in the West and East?  Why? Cite all sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Readings
  • Gordon Documents:  "President Franklin Roosevelt Identifies the ‘Four Freedoms’ at Stake in the War," "A Woman Worker Reflects on the "Good War" at Home During the 1940s," "A Japanese-American Questions the Four Freedoms," and “Ruth Milkman Redefining Women’s Work.”
  • Kennedy: Chapters 18 and 21
  • Rampolla: Chapter 7 and review Chapter 5 material as needed
Multimedia
  • Rosie the Riveter: Real Women Workers in WWII Video
  • Challenge to Democracy (Japanese Internment) Video
  • World War II Food Rationing: "Prices Unlimited" 1944 Office of War Information Video
  • Honouliuli: Hawaii's Hidden Internment Camp Video
  • Segment of Know Your Enemy: Japan | WW2 Propaganda Documentary | 1945 Video (starting at 26:57)
  • Walt Disney's Education for Death Video

Multimedia resources are located within each weekly Instructional Materials page, available in the Content area of the course. 

Discussion 19

This week, the American people have entered the war, however, not of their own choosing.  When the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, most of the isolationist talk vanished, and support for the war effort intensified.  Analyze the willingness of the American people to endure the hardships and sacrifices of the war in the 1940s when they were adamantly isolationist in the 1930s.  What role do you believe propaganda would play in that change of heart?  From your perspective, was the bombing the only reason for support?  Why/why not?  Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 20

Some of the aforementioned propaganda targeted women.  What roles did women play in the war effort?  From your point of view, did women’s efforts lead to immediate changes in their way of life after the war? Why/why not? Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 21

After the United States entered the war, the government identified non-combatant enemy aliens as potential security risks.  While both German and Italians faced internment, their numbers were relatively small in comparison to the wholesale internment of west coast Japanese.  For this question, review the appropriate multimedia options and consider the government’s focus on both first and second generation Japanese.  In what ways were the frenzy and anxiety surrounding Japanese internment deemed acceptable?  How was the loss of Constitutional rights explained and why do you believe the Supreme Court was not flooded with more dissension at the time?  Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Research Paper: Part III

For this assignment, you will submit the final draft of your 8-10 page Research Paper. The paper should follow the outline you submitted in the Research Paper: Outline assignment in Week 5. First, review the Rampolla readings about writing a research paper. Then, elaborate on your main points with specific supporting details. Incorporate an introduction, body, and conclusion. Format in-text citations and create a bibliography in Chicago-Manual style. Additional information on the research paper components and detailed grading rubrics are available in the content area of the course.

Readings
  • Bérubé : Chapters 1-10
  • Gordon Documents:  "An African-American Soldier Notes the ‘Strange Paradox’ of the War"
  • Kennedy: Chapter 22 and Epilogue
Multimedia
  • GI Bill Of Rights 1945 Army-Navy Screen Magazine No 43 World War II Service Benefits Video
  • Bertram Schaffner on Helping Gay Soldiers During WWII Video
  • Eric Foner on African-Americans' Experience During WWII Video
  • American Women in WW2 | Documentary Short | 1944 Video
  • Valentia: Mexican-Americans in World War II Video
  • The Nisei, Japanese American soldiers in World War II Video
Discussion 22

Your readings this week show there were no stereotypical soldiers.  Men and women from various ethnicities, genders, and sexual orientations volunteered (or were drafted) to serve their country and fight for those Four Freedoms (discussed in Week 6 and 7). Yet, many marginalized groups still struggled to be accepted and to participate fully in the war effort. Bérubé illustrates the history of oppression faced by gay soldiers during this time, but he also suggests that this is not a history solely of oppression. Do you agree or disagree?

How did the participation in the war efforts contribute to the development of identity, subculture, and community within these marginalized groups? Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Discussion 23

As we know, after WWI, the government was not quick in answering the needs of the returning service member.  This changed after WWII when the government instituted the G.I. Bill, and with it came numerous opportunities.  From your perspective, was the potential for these opportunities experienced equally for all service members?  Why or why not? 

Bérubé suggests that the war planted seeds of opportunities for gay men and women. Changes in policy, language, and social spaces led to the “redefinition of homosexuality as a political issue” (Bérubé  253). The war also brought many opportunities for women and African Americans.  What opportunities for economic, social, and political achievement were planted for marginalized communities after the war?  From your perspective, were these changes achieved in a timely manner, and if not, what do you believe held up the changes? Defend your discussions with specific examples from your readings this week.  Cite all textbook sources using Chicago-Manual Style in-text citations.

Final Exam

The comprehensive final exam covers all material from Weeks 1 – 8 and is worth 25% of your overall course grade. It is comprised of 20 short answers and 4 essay questions. The exam is closed-book, proctored, and timed. You will have only one two-hour attempt to complete the exam, so please study in advance. Once it is started, it cannot be stopped. It is a good idea to save the exam after each question.

  Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a cumulative process that begins with the first college learning opportunity. Students are responsible for knowing the Academic Integrity policy and procedures and may not use ignorance of either as an excuse for academic misconduct. Columbia College recognizes that the vast majority of students at Columbia College maintain high ethical academic standards; however, failure to abide by the prohibitions listed herein is considered academic misconduct and may result in disciplinary action, a failing grade on the assignment, and/or a grade of "F" for the course.

Additionally, all required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Columbia College is committed to creating a learning environment that meets the needs of its diverse student body. If you anticipate or experience any barriers to learning, communicate your concerns with the instructor. In addition to speaking with the instructor, the following resources are available to ensure an opportunity to learn in an inclusive environment that values mutual respect.

  • For students with disabilities/conditions who are experiencing barriers to learning or assessment, contact the Student Accessibility Resources office at (573) 875-7626 or sar@ccis.edu to discuss a range of options to removing barriers in the course, including accommodations.
  • For students who are experiencing conflict which is impacting their educational environment, contact the Office of Student Conduct at studentconduct@ccis.edu or (573) 875-7877.
  • For students who have concerns related to discrimination or harassment based on sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy or parental status, please contact the Title IX Office at titleixcoordinator@ccis.edu. More information can be found at http://www.ccis.edu/policies/notice-of-non-discrimination-and-equal-opportunity.aspx

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts or exams will be accepted. Late paper assignments will not be accepted, unless a verifiable excuse has been approved by your instructor PRIOR to due date. In that case, late work is due by the following Wednesday at 11:59 pm CT. However, no late work will be accepted after the last day of the course.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.

  Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. If you have technical problems with the VitalSource eText reader, please contact VitalSource. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.