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Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2017/2018

FRCS 101: French Culture And Society

Course Description

This course begins a survey of the social, cultural, literary, and political history of France. The course is designed as an intensive study of French culture and people.  Course meets the World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: None

Proctored Exams: Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

There are no required textbooks for this course. Assigned readings are available within the course or online, with links provided within the course environment.


Course Overview

This course is an overview of French culture, people, and politics.  We will address the stereotypes often associated with the country as well as issues pertaining to centralization, national character, regional identity, secularism, and multiculturalism.  Ranging from prehistory to modern times, the bulk of the course is dedicated to significant historical, artistic, and philosophical movements. You will study historical figures or moments that are especially meaningful for the cultural identity of the French.  From the Lascaux caves to Napoleon, Gothic architecture to the Eiffel Tower, Impressionism to Existentialism, we will touch upon various disciplines as well as cover a range of time periods.  Far from complete, this course begs to be continued; however, if you are curious about all things French, this is your starting point.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To explore the development of cultural identity for this particular people
  • To develop an understanding of and appreciation for the daily life of this particular culture

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the social, literary, political, and economic forces that create a culture
  • Examine the birth, growth, and changes in a particular culture
  • Participate in an intense study of daily life, politics, science, philosophy, religion, architecture, art, music, dance etc.
  • Develop a critical understanding for what it means to have a particular cultural identity in relationship to other cultures

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions 255 26%
Quizzes (8) 300 30%
Annotated Bibliography 50 5%
Research Essay Topic 15 2%
Research Essay 180 18%
Final Exam 200 20%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion 15 Thursday
Discussion 1A 15
Discussion 1B 15 Saturday
Quiz 1 34 Sunday
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2A 15 Thursday
Discussion 2B 15 Saturday
Quiz 2 48 Sunday
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3A 15 Thursday
Discussion 3B 15 Saturday
Research Essay Topic Discussion 15 Sunday
Quiz 3 48
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4A 15 Thursday
Discussion 4B 15 Saturday
Quiz 4 48 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5A 15 Thursday
Discussion 5B 15 Saturday
Annotated Bibliography 50 Sunday
Quiz 5 34
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6A 15 Thursday
Discussion 6B 15 Saturday
Quiz 6 48 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7A 15 Thursday
Discussion 7B 15 Saturday
Research Essay 180 Sunday
Quiz 7 20
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8A 15 Thursday
Discussion 8B 15
Final Exam 200 Saturday
Quiz 8 20
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Discussions are an integral part of the course and will allow you to deepen your understanding of course topics.  There will be two assigned discussions each week.  For each discussion, you are required to post a minimum of two responses to classmates or your instructor. You are required to answer the first discussion question and post responses by Thursday (11:59 pm Central Time) of each week.  The second question and responses must be answered by Saturday (11:59 pm Central Time) except for Week 8 when all discussion questions are due by Thursday.  No late discussion posts will be accepted.

To receive the maximum credit on discussion postings, your post should add to the discussion in a meaningful way by bringing up an original and relevant point. Any sources referenced should be appropriately cited within the text of your discussion posting.

To receive the maximum credit on your responses, each response should encourage, improve, and further the conversation (simply stating “I agree” or “Nice post” does not count as a response).

Discussions are worth 15 points each. Grading criteria are available within the course.

Final Exam

The final exam is proctored.  It is comprehensive and consists of two sections.  Section I consists of T/F and MC questions.  Section II consists of short essay questions.  The final exam is due Saturday at 11:59 pm CT of week 8.  You are allowed 2 hours to complete it.

Quizzes

There are 8 weekly quizzes.  They may consist of T/F, multiple choice, and short essay questions.  Quizzes are due each week on Sunday at 11:59 pm CT except for week 8 when the quiz is due on Saturday.  The point value of quizzes varies according to the number of short essay questions on it. All 20 point quizzes will have no essay questions, 34 point quizzes will have one, and 48 point quizzes will have two. This variation helps to even out your work load from week to week. Times allotted for the quizzes vary depending upon length and will be posted in your course.

Research Essay

You will prepare a formal Research Essay that is due Sunday at 11:59pm CT of Week 7.  You may propose your own topic or choose from a list of topics provided by the instructor.  You should use and cite at least four specific sources, two of which must be outside of assigned course readings. Note that Wikipedia is not an acceptable source. The essay should be written using MLA style. The minimum word count is 1000 words.

Related Assignments

Topic

The topic for your research essay must be submitted in the appropriate discussion topic by Sunday 11:59 pm CT of Week 3.  There are sample topics in the content section of the course

Annotated Bibliography

An annotated bibliography for your research essay must be submitted in the appropriate Dropbox folder by Sunday 11:59 p.m. CT of Week 5. This assignment is worth 20 points.  Your bibliography should contain at least four sources and be written using MLA style. The annotation should describe and evaluate the source’s quality and utility for your essay. There are sample annotated bibliographies in the content section of the course.  It is your responsibility to check your instructor feedback on your bibliography to verify that your sources have been approved for use in your research essay.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: France Perceived
Learning Resources

Lecture: "France Perceived." Ott, Serena

Links to the following required readings are located in your course:

Whittaker, Andrew. France: Be Fluent in French Life and Culture. London: Thorogood Publishing Ltd, 2008: 6-20. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 15 Feb. 2016.

"Meeting the Parisians” in Gendlin, Frances. Culture Shock! : A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette. Tarrytown, NY: Marshall Cavendish International [Asia] Pte Ltd, 2011. 55-63. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

Read the following sections from "Flags of the World" website:

  • Origin of the Regions

  • Status of the Regions

  • Origin of the French Provinces

  • The Provinces Today

  • Origin and Evolution of the Departments

Read the following sections from the "French Culture" website:

  • The French Exception Culturelle

  • Is French culture dead or alive?

  • Facts and figures about culture in France

  • Cultural activities of the French

Introduction Discussion

Let's introduce ourselves! Tell us a little bit about yourself: What is your major? Do you have a hobby? Do you have a special interest in France? Why? 

Discussion 1A

Choose a French region or city other than Paris and briefly present it to the class.  Mention at least three specific landmarks.  Provide a one-day itinerary, including suggestions for lunch and dinner, and include a link to a picture or website.

Discussion 1B

Why do you think Paris is associated with France to the point that it eclipses French diversity?

Quiz 1

This quiz consists of  16 T/F or multiple choice questions and one short essay question.

Week 2: France Before France
Learning Resources

Lecture: "France Before France." Ott, Serena

Lecture: "A New Myth: Asterix and French Ancestry." Ott, Serena

Links to the following required readings are located in your course:

N.p. "The Gallic Rooster." Gouvernement.fr. French Republic, 11 July 2014. Web. 27 Apr. 2016.

Goscinny, and Uderzo. Asterix the Gaul. Trans. Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. London: Hodder and Stoughton, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2016.

Cavendish, Richard. "The Lascaux Cave Paintings Discovered." History Today 65.9 (2015): 8. Humanities International Complete. Web. 5 June 2016.

Smith, Douglas. "Beyond The Cave: Lascaux And The Prehistoric In Post-War French Culture." French Studies 58.2 (2004): 219-232. Humanities International Complete. Web. 5 June 2016.

Discussion 2A

Do you think prehistoric events truly influence the perception that a person has of her/himself?

Discussion 2B

Post an example of a humorous approach to history and compare it to the use of humor in Asterix. 

Quiz 2

This quiz consists of 16 T/F or multiple choice questions and 2 and short essay questions.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Architecture of Power
Learning Resources

Lecture: "Architecture of Power." Ott, Serena

Links to the following required resources are located in your course:

Scott, Robert A. The Gothic Enterprise: A Guide to Understanding the Medieval Cathedral. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web.  9 Apr. 2016. 

  • Chapter 1: What is the Gothic Enterprise? Pages: 11-14
  • Chapter 4: Age of Cathedral Building. Pages: 74-75
  • Chapter 10: Sacred Force and Sacred Space. Pages: 147-148, 153-154

Hugo, Victor, and A. J. Krailsheimer Notre-Dame De Paris. Oxford: Oxford University Press Oxford, 1999. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 9 Feb. 2016. Note: Selected pages will be assigned from this text.

Camille, Michael. “Monsters of Romanticism: The Gargoyles of Victor Hugo.” The Gargoyles of Notre-Dame: Medievalism and the Monsters of Modernity.  Michael Camille. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009. 71-95. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 9 Feb. 2016

Smarthistory. "Birth of the Gothic: Abbot Suger and the Ambulatory at St. Denis." Online video. Gothic. Khan Academy, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2016.

Smarthistory. "Cathedral of Notre Dame de Chartres. Part 1." Online video. Gothic. Khan Academy, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2016.

Smarthistory. "Cathedral of Notre Dame de Chartres. Part 2" Online video. Gothic. Khan Academy, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2016.

Smarthistory. "Cathedral of Notre Dame de Chartres. Part 3" Online video. Gothic. Khan Academy, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2016.

Pégard, Catherine. "Chateau de Versailles." Chateau De Versailles. Etablissement Public Du Château, Du Musée Et Du Domaine National De Versailles, 2016. Web. 29 July 2016. Note: Selected pages will be assigned from this site.

Mauer, Todd. "The Medieval Loire." France Today 26.5 (2011): 14. MasterFILE Premier. Web. 27 July 2016.


Discussion 3A

Browse an art history book or go online to find pictures of Romanesque and Gothic cathedrals.  Describe at least one difference between the two and post a link to a picture. 

Discussion 3B

In a famous line Hugo claimed that the printing press would kill the cathedral.  Do you think architecture or literature is more long-lasting?

Research Essay Topic Discussion

The topic for your research essay must be submitted to this discussion topic by Sunday 11:59 pm CT of Week 3.  There are sample topics in the content section of the course.

Quiz 3

This quiz consists of 16 T/F or multiple choice questions and 2 and short essay questions.

Week 4: From Protest to Fanaticism
Learning Resources

Lecture: "Protest, change, and Fanaticism." Ott, Serena

Links to the following required readings are located in your course:

Diderot, Denis. "Foreword, to Volume VIII." The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert Collaborative Translation Project. Translated by Nelly S. Hoyt and Thomas Cassirer. Ann Arbor: Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library, 2003. Web. 6 Jun. 2016.

Joiner's workshop, making coaches and sedan chairs, from 'Encyclopedia' by Denis Diderot (1713-84), 1762 edition (Engraving) (B/w Photo). (2014). In Bridgeman images: The bridgeman art library. London, United Kingdom: Bridgeman.

The Bakery, illustration from Diderot's 'Encyclopedia', 1770 (Engraving). (2014). In Bridgeman images: The bridgeman art library. London, United Kingdom: Bridgeman.

Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. “Discourse First Part.” Discourse On Inequality: On The Origin And Basis Of Inequality Among Men.[Auckland, N.Z.]: The Floating Press, 2009. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 27 Apr. 2016. Note: Read the first paragraph of the second part.

Rousseau, Jean-Jacques.  Edited by Susan Dunn with essays by Gita May and others. The Social Contract: And, The First And Second Discourses. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 27 Apr. 2016. Note: Read up to and including "The subject of the first book"

Kreis, Steven. “Lecture 11: The Origins of the French Revolution.” The History of Europe: Lectures on Modern European Intellectual History. The History Guide, 2006. Web. 9 Feb. 2016.

Kreis, Steven. “Lecture 12: The French Revolution: The Moderate Stage, 1789-1792.” The History of Europe: Lectures on Modern European Intellectual History. The History Guide, 2006. Web. 9 Feb. 2016

Kreis, Steven. “Lecture 13: The French Revolution: The Radical Stage, 1792-94. The History of Europe: Lectures on Modern European Intellectual History. The History Guide, 2006. Web. 9 Feb. 2016

Kreis, Stephen. “Lecture 15: Europe and the Superior Being: Napoleon” The History of Europe: Lectures on Modern European Intellectual History.  The History Guide, 2006. Web. 13 Feb. 2016

 N.p. "Marianne and the Motto of the Republic." Gouvernement.fr. Gouvernement.fr, 2016. Web. 01 Aug. 2016.

N.p. " Bastille Day: 14 July The National Holiday." Gouvernement.fr. Gouvernement.fr, 2016. Web. 01 Aug. 2016.

N.p. " The Marseillaise." Gouvernement.fr. Gouvernement.fr, 2016. Web. 01 Aug. 2016.

N.p. "The Tricolour Flag." Gouvernement.fr. Gouvernement.fr, 2016. Web. 01 Aug. 2016.

Discussion 4A

View the paintings of Marat and of Napoleon posted in the content area of the course.  Choose one and explain how the historical figure is portrayed.

Discussion 4B

Can historical change be absolute? Must it necessarily be violent?

Quiz 4

This quiz consists of 16 T/F or multiple choice questions and 2 and short essay questions.

Week 5: France Perceived
Learning Resources

Links to the following required readings are located in your course:

Lecture: "Creating a Capital." Ott, Serena

Alvarado, Estevan. “Baron Haussmann and the Modernization of Paris.” Museum of the City. Web. 9 Feb. 2016.

Rearick, Charles. “Paris – Praised, Modernized, Remembered, Staged, and Loved: 19th-century foundations.”  Paris Dreams, Paris Memories: The City and Its Mystique. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 2011. 6-43. eBook Community College Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 12 Feb. 2016.

Baudelaire, Charles.  Translated by James McGowan. “To a Woman Passing By.” The Flowers of Evil. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.  189. eBook Academic Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 12 Feb. 2016.

Articles from the Musée d’Orsay regarding Paris and the art world in the nineteenth century:

  • “Paris, a XIXth century City.” Musée d’Orsay. 2010. Web. 12 Apr. 2016
  • “Painters, the Salon, and Critics. 1848-1870.” Musée d’Orsay. 2010. Web. 12 Apr. 2016
  • “In the times of the impressionist exhibitions.” Musée d’Orsay. 2010. Web. 12 Apr. 2016

Articles from La Tour Eiffel - Official website dossiers:

  • Origins and Construction of the Eiffel Tower
  • The Eiffel Tower during the 1889 Exposition Universelle
  • Debate and Controversy Surrounding the Eiffel Tower
Discussion 5A

View the paintings posted in the Week 5 content area of the course.  Choose one and explain how it represents the principles of Impressionism.

Discussion 5B

Why do you think the Eiffel Tower has become such an effective symbol of France?

Annotated Bibliography

An annotated bibliography for your research essay must be submitted in the appropriate Dropbox folder by Sunday 11:59 p.m. CT of Week 5. This assignment is worth 20 points.  Your bibliography should contain at least four sources and be written using MLA style. The annotation should describe and evaluate the source’s quality and utility for your essay. There are sample annotated bibliographies in the content section of the course.  It is your responsibility to check your instructor feedback on your bibliography to verify that your sources have been approved for use in your research essay.

Quiz 5

This quiz consists of 16 T/F or multiple choice questions and 1 short essay questions.

Week 6: Wars, Artists, and Intellectuals
Learning Resources

Lecture: "Wars, Artists, and Intellectuals." Ott, Serena

Links to the following required readings are located in your course:

History World.  “Timeline: France.” Oxford Reference. 2016. Web. 13 Mar. 2016. Note: Review the years of 1913 – 1918.

Kaufman, Walter (ed). “Existentialism is a Humanism.” Trans. Philip Mairet. Existentialism from Dostoyevsky to Sartre. Marxists Internet Archive. 1998, 2005. Web. 12 Feb. 2016.

Merriman, John. “Lecture 23 - Collaboration and Resistance in World War II.” HIST 202: European Civilization, 1648-1945. Open Yale Courses. 2008. Web. 14 Feb. 2016.

Review the definitions of the following terms in the online Art Encyclopedia. 

  • Avant-Garde
  • Fauvism
  • Analytical Cubism
  • Dada
  • Surrealism (particularly the sections "What is Surrealism?" and "Who Founded Surrealism?"
  • Readymades

Warburger, Nigel.  “A student’s guide to Jean-Paul Sartre’s Existentialism and Humanism.”  Philosophy Now. Issue 15. Web. 26 Jun 2016.

MoMa Learning. "World War I and Dada." MoMa. 2016. Web. 16 June 2016.

Discussion 6A

Identify an artistic example from the Avant-Garde in which the artist refuses the status quo.  Explain how he or she achieves this.

Discussion 6B

Jean-Paul Sartre wrote: “When choosing himself, man is choosing for mankind.”  Explain this quote, reflecting on the role of the intellectual in society.

Quiz 6

This quiz consists of 16 T/F or multiple choice questions and 2 and short essay questions.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: The State and I
Learning Resources

Lecture: "Conflict and Control." Ott, Serena

Links to the following required readings are located in your course:

“The Algerian Powder Keg.” The End of the European Colonies. CVCE. 2014-2016. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

“Decolonization by Force of Arms: the Case of French Indo-China.” The End of the European Colonies. CVCE. 2014-2016. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

Pickles, Dorothy M. "Charles de Gaulle". Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2016. Web. 23 Apr. 2016.

Poggioli, Sylvia. “Marking the French Social Revolution of ’68.” Echoes of 1968. NPR News. 13 May 2008. Web. 14 Mar. 2016.

Hitchman, Simon.  “What is the French New Wave anyway?” New Wave Film. 2008. Web. 14 Mar. 2016.

McNett, Amber.  “The Politics of the French New Wave .” New Wave Film. 2008. Web. 14 Mar. 2016.

Gordon, Daniel A. "Reinterpreting 1968: The Case Of France." Teaching History 162 (2016): 44-45. Academic Search Complete. (EBSCOhost) Web. 1 July 2016.

“A New Society, A New Audience” in Neupert, Richard John. A History Of The French New Wave Cinema. Madison, Wis: University of Wisconsin Press, 2007. 4-12. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 2 July 2016.

Discussion 7A

Share a poster or a motto related to French foreign policy of the 1950s (e.g. Dien Bien Phu, Franco-Algerian war, etc.) or to internal dissent of the 1960s (May 1968, etc) and explain how it reflects dissent and unrest in France.

Discussion 7B

Provide of an example of a film director countering political tendencies through stylistic choices.  Explain whether you think it has been effective. 

Research Essay

You will prepare a formal Research Essay that is due Sunday at 11:59 pm CT of Week 7.  You may propose your own topic or choose from a list of topics provided by the instructor.  You should use and cite at least four specific sources, two of which must be outside of assigned course readings. Note that Wikipedia is not an acceptable source. The essay should be written using MLA style and include a Works Cited page. The minimum word count is 1000 words.

Quiz 7

This quiz consists of 16 T/F or multiple choice questions. 

Week 8: France and the World
Learning Resources

Lecture: "Becoming French." Ott, Serena

Links to the following required readings are located in your course:

Caron, Jean-François. "Understanding and interpreting France's national identity: The meanings of being French." National Identities 15.3 (2013): 223-237.  Academic Search Complete, Web. 10 Feb. 2016.

Erlanger, Steven and Kimiko deFreytas-Tamura. “Old Tradition of Secularism Clashes With France’s New Reality.” New York Times. 5 Feb. 2015. Web.

International Organisation of La Francophonie.  Organisation internationale de la Francophonie. n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2016.

Olivier Milhaud, "Post-Francophonie?" EspacesTemps.net, 7 Aug. 2006. Web.  12 Mar. 2016

Fuga, Artan. Multiculturalism in France: Evolutions and Challenges. Eurosphere Online Working Papers. 12. 2008. Web. 1 July 2016

Waters, Sarah. Between Republic And Market : Globalization And Identity In Contemporary France. New York: Continuum, 2012. 33-41. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 1 July 2016.

Discussion 8A

Choose a francophone country, city, or landscape other than France and briefly present it to the class.  Provide a link to a picture or relevant website.

Discussion 8B

Compare the French policy toward diversity at home and the driving principles of the Francophonie organization.

Final Exam

The Final Exam must be proctored. It is comprehensive and consists of two sections. Section I consists of T/F and MC questions. Section II consists of short essay questions. The final exam is due Saturday at 11:59 pm CT of week 8.  You are allowed 2 hours to complete it.

Quiz 8

This quiz consists of 16 T/F or multiple choice questions.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

No late assignments will be accepted in this course and extra credit work is not available. Extenuating unforeseen circumstances beyond the student’s control may be taken into consideration at the instructor’s discretion. Documentation of the circumstance may be required.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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