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Online classes

Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

ENGL 232: British Literature II

Course Description

Survey from Romantic period through the contemporary.

Prerequisite: ENGL 112

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Greenblatt, Stephen, et. al. The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 2: The Romantic Period through the Twentieth Century. 9th ed. New York: Norton, 2012.
    • ISBN-978-0-393-91248-7

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Welcome to British Literature II. This is the class where we read and explore some of the greatest literature written in the English language during the past two hundred years. We will explore form and function, thematic ideas, and values seen in these art forms. It’s an exciting class with a wealth of material to choose from.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify the periods of British literary history form Romanticism through the contemporary period.
  2. Identify major and some minor authors of these periods.
  3. Explain historical and cultural contexts of literary works.
  4. Write argumentatively about literary works.
  5. Apply the terminology of literary study to interpret works in multiple genres.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussion (16) 160 16%
Reading Journals (8) 240 24%
Essays (3) 300 30%
Exams (2) 300 30%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 10 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 2 10
Journal 1 30 Sunday
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 10 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 4 10
Journal 2 30 Sunday
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 10 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 6 10
Journal 3 30 Sunday
Essay 1 Due: Romantic Poets 100
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 10 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 8 10
Journal 4 30 Sunday
Midterm Exam 150
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 10 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 10 10
Journal 5 30 Sunday
Essay 2 Due: The Victorians 100
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 10 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 12 10
Journal 6 30 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13 10 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 14 10
Journal 7 30 Sunday
Essay 3 Due: The Moderns 100
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15 10 Friday/Saturday
Discussion 16 10
Journal 8 30 Saturday
Final Exam 150
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Discussions should be completed by Saturday of the assigned week, and responses to at least two classmates should be posted by Sunday of the assigned week. Your grade for the discussion will be based on two criteria:

  • Level of participation: the number and timeliness of your posts. Those who post early and often contribute more to the discussion than those who post the minimum number of posts just before the deadline
  • Quality of your contribution to the discussion: substantive posts that help to advance the discussion clearly are of more value that comments such as “I agree” or “good post.” Reflect what you like about the comments of your classmates. Ask questions to engage them in further discussion. Challenge them when you disagree (politely, of course!).

Reading Journals

Each week you will write a page or more of your reactions to at least two of the writings you read that week. What were your problems reading them? What did you really like, and why? Place your journal reactions in the Dropbox.

Papers

You will write three formal papers in the class, 3-5 pages in length: one about the Romantic poets, one about the Victorian period, and one about work from the modern era. You will find more detail about these assignments in the course schedule below and in the course.

Exams

Exams will be given the fourth week and the eighth week. They will consist of essay questions about your readings.


Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Introduction to our class, each other, and Early Romantics
Readings

William Blake, pp. 118-135, “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience”

William Wordsworth, pp. 272-348, “Tintern Abbey,” p. 288, “Ode: Intimations of Immortality,” p. 335, through the sonnets

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, pp. 439-484,”Eolian Harp” through “Kubla Khan”

Mary Wollstonecraft, p. 211-232, “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman”

Also view the information you will find in the content section of the course each week. You will be expected to use this information in your explication of the writings.

Discussion 1
Introduce yourself in the Introduction topic, giving us enough information about you that you become a real person to us. We need to be able to connect with one another and this assignment is one way we can. By Saturday, respond to two postings by other students. Look at the additional resources in the Content area. What do you think you will use to help you understand the works?
Discussion 2
Read William Wordsworth “We Are Seven,” p. 278-279. What is the difference of opinion between the speaker and the little girl? Why does she insist “we are seven” (line 69)? Give both arguments and why they are both correct. Respond to two other students’ postings.
Journal 1
Read William Blake, William Wordsworth, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge in The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Choose one poem by each of the three poets to briefly explain to your reader. Look at the poem for what it says, what it means, and how it is structured. Write at least a page of your reactions to the writings by these authors. What were your problems reading them? What did you really like, and why? Instead of one of the poems you may cover Mary Wollstonecraft's writings in this journal. What is her basic argument?
Week 2: Later Romantics
Readings

George Gordon, Lord Byron, pp. 616-620, and pp. 672-711, “Don Juan” (at least read around in this poem)

Percy Bysshe Shelley, pp. 751-752; “Mutability” and “To Wordsworth,” pp. 773-791: “Hymn to Intellectual Beauty,” “Ozymandias,” and “Ode to the West Wind,” in particular

John Keats, p. 904-951, “On First Looking into Chapman's Homer,” “Sleep and Poetry,” and “On Seeing the Elgin Marbles,” as well from “The Eve of St. Agnes” through “To Autumn.”

Discussion 3
What do you see as a development in these poets? How does their poetry differ from Wordsworth or Coleridge? What is unique that you see in these poems? What do you think the poet wants the reader to see in his poetry?
Discussion 4
Read “To Autumn” by John Keats, p. 951. Describe the scenes he creates. Pay attention to the beginning scenes and how the scene changes from early autumn to right before winter arrives. Read what the others say, and respond to two other postings.
Journal 2
Choose at least one poem from two or more of this week’s writers and briefly explicate it to your reader. What do you think they should show the reader? Write at least a page of your analysis and reactions to the writings by these authors. What were your problems reading them? What did you really like, and why?
Essay 1: Romantic Poets--start drafting
Begin drafting your essay about the Romantic writers this week. Choose one of the poets from the Romantic period and write a three-four page paper, telling your classmates about the writings and what you think the poet was trying to do in his/her work. Obviously, you can’t do everything, so you might want to discuss a common theme in the poetry, a common type of poem written (sonnet, elegy, lyric, ode), or common uses of symbols or metaphors. I expect you to discuss at least three poems in your paper.  Due Sunday night of Week 3.
Week 3: Later Romantics
Readings

John Stuart Mill, p. 1104, “The Subjection of Women"

Alfred, Lord Tennyson, pp. 1159-1177, “The Kraken,” “Mariana,” “The Lady of Shalott,” “The Lotos Eaters,” ” Ulysses,” p. 1170, “ ”In Memoriam,” p. 1186, “The Charge of the Light Brigade,” p. 1235 and read around in 1235-1259, “Idylls of the King,” “Flower in the Crannied Wall” and “Crossing the Bar”

Elizabeth Barrett Browning, p. 1124, “The Cry of the Children,” p. 1129, “Sonnets from the Portuguese”

Robert Browning, p. 1278-1322 “My Last Duchess, p. 1282, “The Bishop Orders His Tomb at Saint Praxed's Church,” p. 1286, “Fra Lippo Lippi,” p. 1300 and p, 1209, “Andrea del Sarto”--all of these are dramatic monologues.

Discussion 5
John Stuart Mill has a different perspective than Mary Wollstonecraft on “The Woman Question.” Compare the two writers on what they think about the problem with women and society.
Discussion 6
Who is the speaker in Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess,” p. 1282? Who is he speaking to? What does he want this audience to know (his purpose in telling this story about his former wife)? Read what the others say, and respond to two other postings.
Journal 3
Choose one of the poems from each of these three poets (Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Robert Browning), and briefly explicate it (explain it) to your reader. How are these poems different in style from Blake, Coleridge or Wordsworth? What do you think they should show the reader about the style of poetry and how it has changed? Post a page or more of writing on the literature we studied this week. What are the problems you have reading? What are the things which surprise you? How is it different from what we read the last two weeks? This is your turn to be a literary critic.
Essay 1 Due: Romantic Poets
Post to the Dropbox by Sunday night (See description in Week 2 and in Content area of class.)
Week 4: Late Victorians
Readings

Matthew Arnold, pp. 1374-1387 “Dover Beach,” and pp. 1418, “Sweetness and Light”

Dante Gabriel Rossetti, pp. 1472-1488

Christina Rossetti, pp. 1490-1509, especially “Goblin Market,” p. 1496

Gerard Manley Hopkins, pp. 1548-1556

Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest,” p. 1733. (You might see if you can find a video of this very funny play to watch as well.)

Discussion 7
Read Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market” p. 1496. (I know it is long, but just read it to find out what happens.) You can listen to it in the Content area being read by David Shaw Parker. Give a summary of what happens in this poem. What did Lizzie do to save her sister, Laura? Read what the others say, and respond to two other postings.
Discussion 8
What have you learned so far in this course? What has been helpful to you? What would benefit you that we have not yet covered? How much have you used the additional resources in the Content area (video, audio files, etc.) Were they beneficial to you?
Journal 4
Again post at least a page of writing on the literature we studied this week. What are the problems you have reading? What are the things which surprise you? Give examples from one or more of the the poets, as well as a reaction to the Wilde play, "The Importance of Being Earnest." How is this literature different from what we read the last two weeks?
Midterm Exam
I will open the midterm online by Monday; you must complete it by midnight Sunday. The exam will require you to write six short essays (a developed paragraph) and six longer essays (2-3 paragraphs).
Essay 2: The Victorians--start drafting

(Due Sunday night of Week 5) Choose one of the writers we read during Weeks 3 and 4 and write a three-four-page paper discussing his or her work. Use at least three examples from the selection in our anthology.

This essay should be appropriately documented using MLA style, with in-text citations (line numbers for poetry, page numbers for prose). An excellent resource and model is Purdue's Online Writing Lab, which provides examples of in-text citations and listings in the Works Cited page in MLA style.

Week 5: Transition to the Moderns
Readings

Thomas Hardy, pp. 1916-1946

W. B. Yeats, "The Stolen Child," p. 2085, "Easter, 1916," p. 1916 and "The Second Coming," p. 2099

George Bernard Shaw, p. 1783

Discussion 9
Drama is represented in this period by Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw. Before this time, plays were usually about royal people (think Shakespeare and all those Dukes, Princes, and Kings), but these playwrights are doing something very different. Discuss how you think drama gains new life by the art of these dramatists.
Discussion 10
Choose one of the poems by Yeats and explicate it (explain it) to your classmates. What is there different about his poetry from the Late Victorians such as the Rossetti, Arnold, and Hopkins. Read what the others say, and respond to two other postings. Look at Yeats and see how he is different from the Romantics or even the Victorians. He has a lot of their characteristics, but he is intellectually sometimes much more challenging. Let him appeal to your imagination.
Journal 5
Post at least a page of writing on the literature we studied this week. What do you think these writers were trying to do that was different from previous authors? What are the things which surprise you?
Essay 2 Due: The Victorians
Post to the Dropbox by Sunday night (See description in Week 4 and in Content area of class.)
Week 6: Twentieth Century
Readings

Virginia Woolf, pp. 2145-2272

T. S. Eliot, pp 2524-2560

James Joyce, “Araby,” p. 2278 and “The Dead,” p. 2282

Discussion 11
What connections can you make between Virginia Woolf’s writing and that of T. S. Eliot? Don’t think just about the difference between prose and poetry. What is it the writer is doing that helps you connect with his/her work? Choose one work by one author and explain, analyze, and react to it for your reader. What is unique or different about this?
Discussion 12
Read James Joyce’s short story, “Araby.” Describe the nature of the speaker to Magnum’s sister. What do we know about her from the speaker’s words? Read what others say and respond to two other postings.
Journal 6
Post at least a page of writing on the literature we studied this week. What are the things which surprise you? How is it different from what we read the last two weeks? This is your turn to be a literary critic.
Essay 3: The Moderns--start drafting

Choose one of the writers we cover during  Week 5, 6, or 7, and write a three-four page paper discussing his or her work. Use at least three examples from the selection in our anthology. You will want your author to be shown in perspective of the other others we have read. How does he/she reflect previous influences as well as show creative originality?

This essay should be appropriately documented using MLA style, with in-text citations (line numbers for poetry, page numbers for prose). An excellent resource and model is Purdue's Online Writing Lab, which provides examples of in-text citations and listings in the Works Cited page in MLA style. Due to the Dropbox Sunday night of Week 7.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Twentieth Century
Readings

W. H. Auden, “Musee des Beaux Arts,” p. 2698; and “In Memory of W. B. Yeats,” p. 2685 and “The Unknown Citizen,” p. 2688

Dylan Thomas, “The Force that Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower,” p. 2698” Fern Hill,” p. 2702, and “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night,” p. 2703.

D. H. Lawrence, “The Horse Dealer’s Daughter,” p. 2496

Doris Lessing, “To Room Nineteen,” 2759

Discussion 13
Compare D. H. Lawrence’s and Doris Lessing’s stories to the stories by James Joyce. What are these artists doing that is new and creative?
Discussion 14
Read Dylan Thomas’ “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night,” p. 2703. What is unique about the organization of this poem? How does that help us get the message the speaker is trying to convey? What is that message? Read what others say and respond to two other postings.
Journal 7
Explicate one of the poems of each of this week’s poets (Auden and Thomas). Post about two pages of writing on the literature we studied this week. What are the problems you have reading? What are the things which surprise you?
Essay 3 Due: The Moderns
Post to the Dropbox by Sunday night (See description in Week 6 and in Content area of class).
Week 8: Preparing for the Final Exam
Readings
Review for final--no new readings.
Discussion 15
What are the things which have surprised you, touched you, or frustrated you in these readings? What was your favorite piece? Why? What was your least favorite? Why?
Discussion 16
How did literature change from the Romantics to the Moderns? What do you see as the values that have changed?
Journal 8
Think back on the past eight weeks and discuss how your perspective of literature has changed if it has. What type of literature or which author was your favorite and why? Summarize what you have come away with from this study of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
Final Exam
The final exam will be similar to the midterm. It will be on line for you on Monday. It is to be completed by midnight Saturday. There will be five short essay questions for you to write. Each essay will be on a general subject by will require that you use specific examples from the textbook to illustrate the points you want to make.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Points will be deducted for other assignments that are late (three points for papers, and two points for quizzes.) These points can be waived for extraordinary circumstances but the student must communicate with me about the reason for lateness.

If you are late in submitting your work, then you are getting more assignments piled on you, and the burden can be too great. I want you to be successful. We do not give Incompletes for these courses except for the most extraordinary cases. Too often, Incompletes turn into failures.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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