Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

ENGL 207: Introduction To Creative Writing I - Multigenre

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  Course Description

Introduction to the writing of fiction, creative nonfiction and poetry.

Prerequisite: ENGL 112

Proctored Exams: Midterm



  Textbooks

As part of TruitionSM, students will receive their course materials automatically as described below.

Required

  •  Burroway, Janet. Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft. 4th ed, Boston, MA: Pearson, 2014.  Physical Book

Bookstore Information

Visit https://www.ccis.edu/bookstore.aspx for details.

eText Information

If a course uses an eText, (see Textbook information above) the book will be available directly in Desire2Learn (D2L) and through the VitalSource eText reader the Friday before the session begins, if registered for courses prior to that date.  Students will have a VitalSource account created for them using their CougarMail email address. Upon first login to VitalSource, students may need to verify their account and update their VitalSource password.  More information about how to use the VitalSource platform, including offline access to eTexts, can be found in D2L.  Students that would like to order an optional print-on-demand copy of eligible eTexts can do so through the VitalSource bookshelf at an additional cost.  Once orders are placed, it can take approximately five to seven business days for students to receive their print-on-demand books.

Physical Course Materials Information

Students enrolled in courses that require physical materials will receive these materials automatically at the address on file with Columbia College.  Delivery date of physical materials is dependent on registration date and shipping location.  Please refer to confirmation emails sent from Ed Map for more details on shipping status.

Returns: Students who drop a course with physical course materials will be responsible for returning those items to Ed Map within 30 days of receipt of the order.  More specific information on how to do so will be included in the package received from Ed Map.  See here for Ed Map's return policy. Failure to return physical items from a dropped course will result in a charge to the student account for all unreturned items.

Note: Students who opt-out of having their books provided as part of TruitionSM are responsible for purchasing their own course materials.

  Course Overview

Introduction to Creative Writing is designed to introduce the basic terms, crafts, techniques, and concepts of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. It is a starting block, the foundation upon which you will build the rest of your writing life. In this course, we will examine numerous facets of both poetry and prose, as well as discuss the traits of writing that are both shared and unique to each genre. As the course progresses, you will become more acquainted with the various terms, forms, techniques, and genres presented and begin implementing them in your work. The more you works with all of the above, the more you learn and grow as a writer. Though this course does include peer-focused Writer’s Workshops, much of the work will also consist of examination of professional writing by renowned writers. Examination of other writers’ craft, use of character, setting, detail, etc., informs your own writing. Consequently, Introduction to Creative Writing is a reading intensive course. The Midterm Exam consists of a proctored exam of your understanding of the crafts, concepts, genres, terms, forms, and readings covered in the first four weeks of the class. The course then builds toward the peer-focused Writer’s Workshops, and culminates with a Final Portfolio of your revised writings from the course. Each writing assignment is graded by the merit of your exploration of the concepts and materials presented in the course, rather than on the aesthetics of any given piece.

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate the crafts of poetry, short fiction, and literary essay writing.
  2. Demonstrate the process of creative writing, including drafting, workshop, and revision.
  3. Analyze the work of peer and professional writers, paying special attention to elements of craft and genres.

  Grading

Grading Scale

Grade Points Percent
A 774-860 90-100%
B 688-773 80-89%
C 602-687 70-79%
D 516-601 60-69%
F 0-515 0-59%

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (13) 260 30%
Creative Writing Unit Assignments (3) 150 17%
Creative Writing Exercises (4) 100 12%
Midterm (1) 100 12%
Final Portfolio (1) 250 29%
Total 860 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion -- Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 1 20
Creative Writing Exercise 1: Riddle Poem 25 Sunday

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 20 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 3 20
Creative Writing Exercise 2: Persona Poem 25 Sunday
Proctor Information N/A

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 20 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 5 20
Discussion 6: Writer's Workshop 20 Thursday/Saturday
Creative Writing Unit Assignment 1: Poem 50 Sunday

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 20 Thursday/Sunday
Creative Writing Exercise 3: The Lake 25 Sunday
Midterm Exam 100

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 20 Thursday/Sunday
Creative Writing Unit Assignment 2: Short Story 50 Sunday

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 20 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 10 20
Creative Writing Exercise 4: Brevity Magazine 25 Sunday

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 20 Thursday/Sunday
Creative Writing Unit Assignment 3: Memoir Chapter 50 Sunday

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 12: Writer's Workshop 20 Tuesday/Thursday
Discussion 13 20 Wednesday/Saturday
Final Portfolio 250 Friday
Total Points: 860

  Assignment Overview

Discussions

General Discussions

Discussions are designed to further examine the writing concepts raised in the course in order to facilitate synthesis of the material and promote successful application of these concepts and techniques in your writing. Initial posts for each weekly discussion are due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Thursday (except in Week 8, when initial post are due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Wednesday). Posts should be substantial, considerate, professionally written in MLA format, and reflective of critical thought. Responses should aim to help move the conversation forward and enrich the depth of the discussion. You should post at least two responses to classmates’ posts in each discussion by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday (except in Week 8, when responses are due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Saturday). Each discussion is worth 20 points.

Writer’s Workshop Discussions

Two discussions in the session are specifically designed as writer’s workshop discussions. The goal of these discussions is to receive peer feedback of your work before submitting it for grading, and to provide feedback to your classmates on their work. Response posts to classmates should provide respectful, productive feedback on their written work. These responses should be specific and relate to the elements of craft discussed in class. Unlike general course discussions, you are required to post responses to five (5) pieces of your classmates’ work in the Writer’s Workshop discussions. Writer’s Workshop discussions are 20 points each. Due dates for the writer’s workshop discussions are as follows:

    • Week 3: Initial post by 11:59 p.m. CT Thursday; five response posts by 11:59 p.m. CT Saturday
    • Week 8: Initial post by 11:59 p.m. CT Tuesday; five response posts by 11:59 p.m. CT Thursday

    Creative Writing Exercises

    There will be four creative writing exercises throughout the course. Each exercise is worth 25 points and due by 11:59 p.m. CT on the Sunday of the week it is assigned. Each exercise should follow the formatting outlined in the Content Area of the course.

    Creative Writing Exercise 1: Riddle Poem

    This exercise is designed to provide an accessible springboard for newcomers to poetry. The assignment offers a tangible, playful first leap into writing a poem, paying close attention to imagery and details—two aspects of writing that will also inform writing prose later in the course. The assignment asks that each of you, in a contemporary voice, write a riddle poem in the tradition of the Anglo-Saxon riddle poems we’ve read this week. Leave readers to guess the riddle’s answer. Week 1’s Riddle Poem is due by 11: 59 PM (CT), Sunday of Week 1. It is worth 25 points.

    Creative Writing Exercise 2: Persona Poem

    Write a poem from the point of view of another person or object. It can be a friend, a family member, a celebrity—whoever, or whatever you like, fictional or nonfictional. Writing persona poems allows the poet to wear a mask and speak from another’s shoes, with another’s tongue. In that way, the genre is wide open for experimenting with different voices in poetry. With a persona poem, the poet steps into the mind, or identity of another person, or thing, and speaks from that “persona.” It’s a fabulous genre of poetry to explore, especially as an early poet. Submit your Persona Poem to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night of Week 2. It is worth 25 points.

    Creative Writing Exercise 3: The Lake

    The following exercise is from John Gardner’s The Art of Fiction: Write a 1- to 3-page description of a lake as viewed by a young man who has just committed murder. Do NOT mention the murder. Do NOT focus mainly on the character; focus mainly on the lake. Consider how you can use rich detail, word choice, connotation and denotation, internal and external dialogue, and other writing concepts we’ve studied so far, to evoke the understanding in readers that the character in the piece has just killed someone, without stating so outright. Submit Exercise 3: The Lake to the Dropbox by 11: 59 PM (CT), Sunday night of Week 4. It is worth 25 points.

    Creative Writing Exercise 4: Brevity Magazine

    Read at least three pieces at Brevity Magazine (link found in the Content area). Then, write a 750-word, nonfiction essay for the magazine that fits with its style and audience. Try to focus on one incident, or character. The subject can be about anything but yourself. Most likely, it will require a bit of research. Submit Exercise 4: Brevity Magazine to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night of Week 6. It is worth 25 points.

    Creative Writing Unit Assignments

    There will be three creative writing unit assignments throughout the course. Each unit assignment is worth 50 points and due by 11:59 p.m. CT on the Sunday of the week it is assigned. Each unit assignment should follow the formatting outlined in the Content Area.

    Creative Writing Unit Assignment 1: Poem

    The Unit 1 Poem assignment is wide open: Write a poem in second- or third-person. Formal or free verse, rhyme or no rhyme, it’s up to you. In the end, there is no better way to learn to write poetry than to write poetry. Do your best to consider and work in the various writing concepts we’ve discussed in the course thus far. If you have trouble coming up with ideas, look over the “Try This” exercises included throughout Burroway’s Imaginative Writing. Submit your Unit 1 Poem to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night of Week 3. It is worth 50 points.

    Creative Writing Unit Assignment 2: Short Story

    Write a short story. Make sure the story follows the arc of a traditional story. It should have a distinct beginning, middle, and end. The story should contain an exposition, inciting incident, followed by rising action that builds to a climax. After the climax, the story should indicate some form of falling action leading to a resolution of some kind. Submit the Unit 2: Short Story to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night of Week 5. It is worth 50 points.

    Creative Writing Unit Assignment 3: Memoir Chapter

    For this assignment, you will write a chapter of your memoir. Choose a poignant moment in your life that has led to great change, growth, or understanding for you—something significant, even if the catalyst is something incredibly small, so long as the epiphany it sparks is larger, if not life-changing. The more focused it is on a single time or incident in your life, the better. This will help define a single “chapter” of your life in what could be a potentially larger memoir. Submit the Unit 3: Memoir Chapter to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night of Week 7. It is worth 50 points.

    Midterm Exam

    The Midterm Exam is proctored and consists of 10 questions designed to gauge your level of comprehension of the writing concepts presented in the first four weeks of the course. It will consist of several short-answer questions, as well as questions that ask you to identify various writing concepts in short passages of writing. Other questions will ask you to apply a concept covered thus far, such as reinventing a cliché, or altering tone, etc. The time limit for the exam is 120 minutes. Only one attempt will be accepted. No textbooks or outside readings, notes, use of cell phones, or web browsing, will be allowed. Proctor forms are due by 11:59 p.m. CT Sunday of Week 2.

    The Midterm Exam must be completed by 11: 59 PM (CT), Sunday of Week 4. It is worth 100 points

    Final Portfolio

    The Final Portfolio will help prepare you for the inevitability of assembling a manuscript for publication. Your final portfolio should include six items/files in total:
    • Two revised Exercises (Riddle Poem, Persona Poem, The Lake, Brevity Magazine)
    • One revised Unit assignment (Unit 1 Poem, Unit 2 Short Story, Unit 3 Memoir Chapter)
    • A 2-page (500-700 word) analysis of one assigned reading over the duration of the course. The analysis should include specific examples of the craft and genre elements employed in the work. The student should reflect on how these elements affect the reading of the work.
    • A 1- to 2-page letter to the instructor reflecting on the students’ personal growth as a writer as they prepare to exit the course, including what place they foresee creative writing holding in their future, and a short list of their favorite writers/readings from Burroway’s Imaginative Writing, or linked into the course.
    • A 1- to 2-page explication of the revisions made on the Unit assignment included in the Final Portfolio.

    Be sure to label every file to make the components of your Final Portfolio easily identifiable, so there is no mistaking what each file is intended to represent to meet the Final Portfolio’s requirement.

    You must submit the Final Portfolio to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Friday night of Week 8. It is worth 250 points.

      Course Outline

    Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

    Required Resources
    • Burroway
      • Chapter 1
      • Chapter 2: pages 15-27, 39-43
    • Anglo-Saxon Riddle Poems (found in the Content area)
    • Sylvia Plath: "Metaphors" (found in the Content area)
    • May Swenson: "Living Tenderly" (found in the Content area)
    Introduction Discussion
    Introduce yourself to the class. If you feel comfortable, share where you are located. Do you have any hobbies? Why have you chosen to take a creative writing class? Can you share a few favorite authors, or books?

    Consider the prompts above as starting points. Use this discussion to meet, mingle, and get to know each other. The more we get to know each other, the more care we will inevitably put into supporting each other over the next eight weeks. 
    Discussion 1

    Select one of the assigned poems for this week. Identify three key images that most reveal that poem’s subject. How does the poem’s use of imagery help reveal that subject?

    Keep in mind that imagery can convey more than just visual images. Seek details that help describe the other four senses, as well. How can incorporating descriptions of sound, touch, taste, and smell, add to the imagery in a piece of writing, as well? What impact might that have on a poem?

    Main posts to Discussion 1 are due by 11:59 p.m. CT Thursday. At least two responses to your classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
    Creative Writing Exercise 1: Riddle Poem

    This exercise is designed to provide an accessible springboard for newcomers to poetry. The assignment offers a tangible, playful first leap into writing a poem, paying close attention to imagery and details—two aspects of writing that will also inform writing prose later in the course. The assignment asks that you, in a contemporary voice, write a riddle poem in the tradition of the Anglo-Saxon riddle poems we’ve read this week. Leave readers to guess the riddle’s answer. See the Content Area for more information.

    Week 1’s Riddle Poem is due by 11: 59 PM (CT), Sunday of Week 1. It is worth 25 points.

    Required Resources
    • Burroway
      • Chapter 3: pages 47-61, 85-89
      • Chapter 10
    • Seamus Heaney: "Bog Queen" (found in the Content area)
    • Cate Marvin: "A Windmill Makes a Statement" (found in the Content area)
    • Melissa Range: "The Rope," "The Harpoon," "The Warhorse"  (found in the Content area)
    Discussion 2

    In what way(s) can point of view help establish one’s chosen persona when writing a persona poem? Would writing in a formal style, or in free verse, alter how one incorporates point of view in order to establish a persona? If so, how?

    Your initial response to Discussion 2 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT ThursdayAt least two responses to your classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.

    Discussion 3

    Write up a short character sketch of someone you dislike (no name necessary). Then, set a timer for 10 minutes and free write a monologue in which that person tells you an anecdote from his or her childhood. Once you start writing, don’t stop. Keep writing. Keep that character talking until the alarm sounds the best you can. Don’t worry if it doesn’t have an ending.

    This is a small twist on the TRY THIS 3.4 exercise found in Burroway’s Imaginative Writing.

    Post the character sketch, followed by the monologue, together in one post, by 11:59 p.m. CT Thursday. In addition, be sure to react to at least two of your classmates’ posts by 11:59 p.m. Sunday. Consider the voice or POV they use. What about it did you find interesting? Did the monologue match the “voice” of the sketch? How? Be specific, descriptive, and respectful.

    Creative Writing Exercise 2: Persona Poem

    Write a poem from the point of view of another person or object. It can be a friend, a family member, a celebrity—whoever, or whatever you like, fictional or nonfictional. See the Content Area for more information.

    Submit your Persona Poem to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night. It is worth 25 points.
    Proctor Information
    Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
    Required Resources
    • Burroway
      • Chapter 4: pages 94-108, 127-30
      • Chapter 5: pages 135-148, 154-157
      • Chapter 7: pages 208-211
    Discussion 4

    Select one of the poems from the end of Chapter 4 and discuss how it demonstrates some or all of the lessons of character presentation discussed by Burroway in Imaginative Writing (i.e., character as desire, image, voice, action, thought, presented by the author, conflict, and stock and flat characters).

    Your initial response to Discussion 4 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT ThursdayAt least two responses to your classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.

    Discussion 5

    Select one of the poems at the end of Chapter 5. In what ways does the poem conform to Burroway’s definition of setting as the world, as a camera, as mood, symbol, and/or as action?

    Your initial post should be posted by 11:59 p.m. CT Thursday. In addition, be sure to react to at least two of your classmates’ posts by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.

    Discussion 6: Writer's Workshop

    Post one of the poems you’ve written from the first three weeks of the course that you want your classmates to workshop by 11:59 p.m. Thursday of Week 3. Then, provide detailed feedback on 5 different pieces by your classmates by 11:59 p.m. Saturday of Week 3.

    Creative Writing Unit Assignment 1: Poem

    The Unit 1 Poem assignment is wide open: Write a poem in second- or third-person. Formal or free verse, rhyme or no rhyme, it’s up to you. In the end, there is no better way to learn to write poetry than to write poetry. Do your best to consider and work in the various writing concepts we’ve discussed in the course thus far. If you have trouble coming up with ideas, look over the “Try This” exercises included throughout Burroway’s Imaginative Writing. See the Content Area for more information on this assignment.

    Submit your Unit 1 Poem to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night. It is worth 50 points.

    Required Resources
    • Burroway
      • Chapter 6: page 166–175, 187–190
      • Chapter 9
    Discussion 7

    Take 15 minutes and complete Chapter 9’s “Try This” 9.8 (pg. 270). Don’t worry about polishing the piece. Just dive in and write as much as you can, as fast as you can in that time, and see how far into the story you can push it. Give it a once-over after that to correct any obvious spelling or punctuation errors and leave it at that. Then, provide an outline for the rest of the story, bearing in mind the assigned readings, especially on plot and story. Post the results as your main response in the discussion.

    Your initial response to Discussion 7 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT ThursdayAt least two responses to your classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.

    Creative Writing Exercise 3: The Lake

    The following exercise is from John Gardner’s The Art of Fiction: Write a 1- to 3-page description of a lake as viewed by a young man who has just committed murder. Do NOT mention the murder. Do NOT focus mainly on the character; focus mainly on the lake. See the Content Area for more information on this assignment.

    Submit Exercise 3: The Lake to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night. It is worth 25 points.
    Midterm Exam

    The Midterm Exam is proctored and consists of 10 questions designed to gauge your level of comprehension of the writing concepts presented in the first four weeks of the course. It will consist of several short-answer questions, as well as questions that ask you to identify various writing concepts in short passages of writing. Other questions will ask you to apply a concept covered thus far, such as reinventing a cliché, or altering tone, etc. The time limit for the exam is 120 minutes. Only one attempt will be accepted. No textbooks or outside readings, notes, use of cell phones, or web browsing, will be allowed. Proctor forms are due by 11:59 p.m. CT Sunday of Week 2.

    The Midterm Exam must be completed by 11: 59 PM (CT), Sunday of Week 4, and is worth 100 points.

    Required Resources

    James Salter: "Last Night" (found in the Content area)

    Discussion 8

    Which point of view does James Salter establish in “Last Night”? Why do you think Salter chose that point of view? How was it effective or not effective? What would be the impact on the story if it had been written in a different point of view? Explain why you think so. Consider how Salter’s chosen point of view contributes to the conflict, and eventual climax, in the story. What do you consider the first example of conflict in the story? What is the story’s climax? Why might some find these questions debatable?

    How does point of view tie into the conclusion of the story? Though the story concludes without a defined resolution for the characters involved, it nevertheless, comes to an end. How does Salter make that work, and how does that tie to point of view?

    Your initial response to Discussion 8 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT ThursdayAt least two responses to your classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.

    Creative Writing Unit Assignment 2: Short Story

    Write a short story. Make sure the story follows the arc of a traditional story. It should have a distinct beginning, middle, and end. The story should contain an exposition, inciting incident, followed by rising action that builds to a climax. After the climax, the story should indicate some form of falling action leading to a resolution of some kind. See the Content Area for more information on this assignment.

    Submit the Unit 2: Short Story to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night. It is worth 50 points.
    Required Resources
    • Burroway
      • Chapter 7: pages 195-208, 211-224
      • Chapter 8
    • Brevity magazine Website (link found in Content area)
    Discussion 9

    Select one of the readings at the end of Chapter 8 in Burroway’s Imaginative Writing. How does it conform to the rules of creative nonfiction? How is the piece similar to fiction? How does it differ from fiction?

    Your initial response to Discussion 9 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT ThursdayAt least two responses to your classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.

    Discussion 10

    After reading Chapter 7 in Burroway’s Imaginative Writing, develop a revision plan for the unit piece you are likely to include in your portfolio. Do you need to outline or make a quilt? What are the major weaknesses with the piece and how do you intend to address them?

    Your initial response to Discussion 10 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT ThursdayAt least two responses to your classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.

    Creative Writing Exercise 4: Brevity Magazine

    Read at least three pieces at Brevity magazine (link found in the Content area). Then, write a 750-word, nonfiction essay for the magazine that fits with its style and audience. Try to focus on one incident, or character. The subject can be about anything but yourself. Most likely, it will require a bit of research. See the Content Area for more information on this assignment.

    Submit Exercise 4: Brevity magazine to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night. It is worth 25 points.

    Course Evaluation
    Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
    Required Resources

    Joan Didion: Slouching Towards Bethelehem (found in the Content area)

    Discussion 11

    What craft techniques does Didion employ throughout the essay? Draw on all of our craft targets over the last six weeks to help you answer. How would you characterize the voice of the essay? How do the craft techniques Didion employs help create this voice or, set this tone? How would you classify Slouching Towards Bethlehem? Is it a memoir? Creative nonfiction? Literary fiction? Or, is it a hybrid of some sort? Share your thoughts on these questions, and be sure to respond to at least two of your classmates’ posts, as well.

    Your initial response to Discussion 11 is due by 11:59 p.m. CT ThursdayAt least two responses to your classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.

    Creative Writing Unit Assignment 3: Memoir Chapter

    Choose a poignant moment in your life that has led to great change, growth, or understanding for you—something significant, even if the catalyst is something incredibly small, so long as the epiphany it sparks is larger, if not life-changing. The more focused it is on a single time or incident in your life, the better. This will help define a single “chapter” of your life in what could be a potentially larger memoir. See the Content Area for more information on this assignment.

    Submit the Unit 3: Memoir Chapter to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Sunday night. It is worth 50 points.
    Required Resources

    Lecture: Beyond Introduction to Creative Writing

    Discussion 12: Writer's Workshop

    For Writer's Workshop 2, post one of the prose pieces you’ve written in Weeks 4–8 in the course that you want your classmates to workshop by 11:59 p.m. CT on Tuesday. Then, provide detailed feedback to five different pieces by your classmates by 11:59 p.m. CT on Thursday.

    Because your final portfolio is due on Friday, it is all the more important that everyone post their main responses to Writer’s Workshop 2 as early in the week as possible.

    Discussion 13
    Final Reflections: Take a moment to reflect on your personal growth as a writer during this session. How do you see creative writing within your life in their future? Has this course changed how you feel about creative writing? How? What writers and/or readings from Burroway’s Imaginative Writing, or linked into the course, had an impact on you this session? Post your thoughts by 11:59 p.m. CT on Wednesday, and respond to at least two of your classmates by 11:59 p.m. CT on Saturday.
    Final Portfolio

    The Final Portfolio will help prepare you for the inevitability of assembling a manuscript for publication. Your final portfolio should include six items/files in total:

    • Two revised Exercises (Riddle Poem, Persona Poem, The Lake, Brevity magazine)
    • One revised Unit assignment (Unit 1 Poem, Unit 2 Short Story, Unit 3 Memoir Chapter)
    • A 2-page (500-700 word) analysis of one assigned reading over the duration of the course. The analysis should include specific examples of the craft and genre elements employed in the work. The student should reflect on how these elements affect the reading of the work.
    • A 1- to 2-page letter to the instructor reflecting on the students’ personal growth as a writer as they prepare to exit the course, including what place they foresee creative writing holding in their future, and a short list of their favorite writers/readings from Burroway’s Imaginative Writing, or linked into the course.
    • A 1- to 2-page explication of the revisions made on the Unit assignment included in the Final Portfolio.

    Be sure to label every file to make the components of your Final Portfolio easily identifiable, so there is no mistaking what each file is intended to represent to meet the Final Portfolio’s requirement.

    You must submit the Final Portfolio to the Dropbox by 11:59 PM (CT), Friday night of Week 8. It is worth 250 points.


      Course Policies

    Student Conduct

    All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

    Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

    Academic integrity is a cumulative process that begins with the first college learning opportunity. Students are responsible for knowing the Academic Integrity policy and procedures and may not use ignorance of either as an excuse for academic misconduct. Columbia College recognizes that the vast majority of students at Columbia College maintain high ethical academic standards; however, failure to abide by the prohibitions listed herein is considered academic misconduct and may result in disciplinary action, a failing grade on the assignment, and/or a grade of "F" for the course.

    Additionally, all required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

    Non-Discrimination

    There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

    Student Accessibility Resources

    Columbia College is committed to creating a learning environment that meets the needs of its diverse student body. If you anticipate or experience any barriers to learning, communicate your concerns with the instructor. In addition to speaking with the instructor, the following resources are available to ensure an opportunity to learn in an inclusive environment that values mutual respect.

    • For students with disabilities/conditions who are experiencing barriers to learning or assessment, contact the Student Accessibility Resources office at (573) 875-7626 or sar@ccis.edu to discuss a range of options to removing barriers in the course, including accommodations.
    • For students who are experiencing conflict which is impacting their educational environment, contact the Office of Student Conduct at studentconduct@ccis.edu or (573) 875-7877.
    • For students who have concerns related to discrimination or harassment based on sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy or parental status, please contact the Title IX Office at titleixcoordinator@ccis.edu. More information can be found at http://www.ccis.edu/policies/notice-of-non-discrimination-and-equal-opportunity.aspx

    Online Participation

    You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

    Attendance Policy

    Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

    Cougar Email

    All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

    Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

    Late Assignment Policy

    An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

    No late discussion posts will be accepted.

    Writing assignments can be turned in up to one week late, with a penalty of a 10% reduction in grade for every day it is late. The Final Portfolio must be turned in on time and will not be accepted late.

    Course Evaluation

    You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

    Proctor Policy

    Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.

      Additional Resources

    Orientation for New Students

    This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

    Technical Support

    If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. If you have technical problems with the VitalSource eText reader, please contact VitalSource. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

    Online Tutoring

    Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

    Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.