Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

CISS 234: Visual Basic

Back to Top

  Course Description

An introduction to programming using Visual Basic. Emphasis is on Visual Basic syntax and creating user interfaces in Visual Basic. Topics include application design, using variables and constants, the selection and repetition structures, sequential access files, menus, dialog boxes and error trapping, random access files, database access and arrays. 

Prerequisite: MATH 150 and CISS 170, CISS 171, or CISS 176

Proctored Exams: Midterm and Final



  Textbooks

As part of TruitionSM, students will receive their course materials automatically as described below.

Required

  •  Gaddis, T. & Irvine K.R.. (2016). Starting out with Visual Basic (7th Ed.). Pearson.  eText

Bookstore Information

Ed Map is Columbia College’s bookstore for Online, Nationwide, and Evening students.

eText Information

If a course uses an eText, (see Textbook information above) the book will be available directly in Desire2Learn (D2L) and through the VitalSource eText reader the Friday before the session begins, if registered for courses prior to that date.  Students will have a VitalSource account created for them using their CougarMail email address. Upon first login to VitalSource, students may need to verify their account and update their VitalSource password.  More information about how to use the VitalSource platform, including offline access to eTexts, can be found in D2L.  Students that would like to order an optional loose-leaf print-on-demand copy of eligible eTexts can do so through the Ed Map storefront at an additional cost.  Once orders are placed, it can take approximately five to seven business days for students to receive their print-on-demand books.

Physical Course Materials Information

Students enrolled in courses that require physical materials will receive these materials automatically at the address on file with Columbia College.  Delivery date of physical materials is dependent on registration date and shipping location.  Please refer to confirmation emails sent from Ed Map for more details on shipping status.

Returns: Students who drop a course with physical course materials will be responsible for returning those items to Ed Map within 30 days of receipt of the order.  More specific information on how to do so will be included in the package received from Ed Map.  See here for Ed Map's return policy. Failure to return physical items from a dropped course will result in a charge to the student account for all unreturned items.

Note: Students who opt-out of having their books provided as part of TruitionSM are responsible for purchasing their own course materials, but may do so through the Ed Map storefront. Visit https://www.ccis.edu/bookstore.aspx for details.

  Course Overview

This course will introduce you to the fundamental principles and implementation of programming with Visual Basic. It surveys both the programming concepts relevant to business and the development of applications used in a business environment. Specifically, it covers interface design, sequential, repetition, and decision structures, writing object-oriented programming, and working with databases.

In this course, you will learn about Visual Basic through three approaches. First, you will read the textbook, work on the tutorials throughout the textbook and then work on weekly programming assignments which will reflect the knowledge learned. Next, you will participate in a weekly discussion and provide feedback to your peers. Finally, at the end of the semester, you will take a comprehensive final exam covering all of the Visual Basic programming skills that you have learned.

This course is intended for you in management information systems. However, motivated non-majors are also welcome. We assume that you have met prerequisites for this course and that you have Microsoft Visual Basic 2012 Express Edition or later edition installed on your computers.

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the following: 

  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Visual Basic 2012 Express Edition or later edition (such as Visual Studio Community 2015)
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of programming.
  2. Demonstrate principles of object-oriented programming.
  3. Differentiate various data types and control structures in a programming language.
  4. Write and Debug moderately complex computer programs.

  Grading

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (8) 80 11%
Dropbox Assignments (10) 300 41%
Midterm Exam (1) 100 14%
Final Project (1) 150 21%
Final Exam (1) 100 14%
Total 730 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion - Thursday
Discussion 1 10 Thursday/Sunday
Dropbox 1 30 Sunday
Dropbox 2 30

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 10 Thursday/Sunday
Dropbox 3 30 Sunday
Dropbox 4 30
Proctor Information N/A

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 10 Thursday/Sunday
Dropbox 5 30 Sunday
Dropbox 6 30

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 10 Thursday/Sunday
Dropbox 7 30 Sunday
Midterm Exam 100

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 10 Thursday/Sunday
Dropbox 8 30 Sunday
Dropbox 9 30

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6 10 Thursday/Sunday
Dropbox 10 30 Sunday

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 10 Thursday/Sunday

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 10 Thursday/Saturday
Final Exam 100 Saturday
Final Project 150 Thursday
Total Points: 730

  Assignment Overview

Discussions

There is a non-graded Introduction Discussion (due Thursday by 11:59 p.m. CT of Week 1) and 8 graded discussions in the course, worth 10 points each. Besides posting your own response, you are also expected to reply to two (2) of your peers’ discussion posts.

Initial response should be completed by 11:59 p.m. CT, Thursday of each week. You are expected to address all questions posed with comprehensive and original answers.  You must respond to two (2) of your peers’ discussion posts by 11:59 p.m. CT, Sunday of each week, except for week 8 where due is on 11:59 p.m. CT, Saturday. Just an “I agree” or “I like this” is not an acceptable reply.

Dropbox Assignments

There are ten (10) Dropbox Assignments in the course to be submitted in the first six weeks (Weeks 1 – 6). Dropbox Assignments are programming exercises. You will complete a series of programming exercises from the textbook and submit the final product as a zip folder file to the correct Dropbox folder (see instructions for uploading the zip files in Content, Week 1). Each assignment will be graded according to the point system presented in the rubric found in the course Content area. Dropbox Assignments are due by 11:59 p.m. CT, Sunday of each week.

Exams

There are two proctored exams in the course – Midterm Exam and Final Exam, each worth 100 points. Both exams consist of 50 Multiple Choice Questions. The questions are covered from readings of the textbook. The Midterm Exam covers Chapters 1-7 and Final Exam covers Chapters 8-10, and 12. The exams are closed-book and computer based.

The Midterm Exam opens on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 4 and is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday of the same week. The Final Exam opens on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 8 and is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Saturday of the same week. You will have only one (1) attempt and 120 minutes for each exam. Keep this in mind when scheduling your proctored exam.

You will need an Internet-connected computer when taking the exam, but the only window that can be opened is the exam webpage. The use of cell phones, pagers and flash drive in taking your proctored exam is prohibited. 

Proctor information is due on 11:59 p.m. CT, Sunday in week two (2). You must submit the “Student Proctor Information Submission Form” to the Proctor Information Dropbox by the end of Week 2. This form and additional information about Proctoring is located in the Content area of the course.

Final Project

There is a Final Project, worth 150 points, in the course. The Final Project is due by 11:59 p.m. CT, Thursday of Week 8. This is a programming exercise in which you need to create a Visual Basic application that allows the user to enter employee data. You can design the application however you like and you can be creative with it.

  Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Readings

Gaddis: Starting with Microsoft Visual Basic (7th Ed.)

  • Preface beginning on page xvii
  • Attention to Students on page xxv
  • Chapter 1: Introduction to Programming and Visual Basic
  • Chapter 2: Creating Applications with Visual Basic
Introduction Discussion

Please introduce yourself to your instructor and classmates. Tell us a little about yourself. Where do you live? What is your major? What are your favorite hobbies? Lastly, what are your interests in Management Information Systems? 

This is a non-graded post.

Please post by Thursday evening by 11:59 p.m. CT. 

Discussion 1

1. Are each of the following controls names legal or illegal?  If a name is illegal, describe why and recreate the name so that it is legal.

  • txtMyFirstName
  • 2017sales
  • lblEnterYourAge
  • txtStreet/Address
  • btnCalculateIntRate

2. Why is it a good idea to equip a form with a button that terminates the application, if the form already has a standard Windows Close button in the upper right corner?  Provide an example where this would be good.  

In your responses, compare your answer and example with two of your peers and state the similarities and/or differences. Also, check if they missed any illegal names and lend a hand if they did.

Provide your initial post by Thursday evening at 11:59 p.m. CT. Reply to two of your peers by Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT.

Dropbox 1

Chapter 1, Programming Challenge 1 Carpet Size.  Page 40 of the textbook. 

Follow the instructions listed in the textbook.  Section 1.4, "The Programming Process," will walk you through the process for developing a Visual Basic Application which you can use as a guide. You will not be creating this application, but identifying the process for development. Use a Word document to provide steps 1-6 listed on Page 40 of the textbook and upload to Dropbox 1.

In addition to this, submit a new Visual Basic form as shown in Tutorials 1-5 and name it My First Project.  The folder that you create for this needs to be zipped with all the Visual Basic files when you are done and uploaded to Dropbox 1. 

Dropbox 2

Chapter 2, Programming Challenge 2 Math Tutor Application. Page 120 of the textbook.

Follow the instructions listed in the textbook. Add comments to the top of your program with the following:

‘ Name of Project: Math Tutor Application

‘ Purpose: Describe what the project is doing

‘ Programmer: Your name and date

Note: You will need to do this for each programming Dropbox submitted. As well as commenting your code explaining what your code is doing.

Readings

Gaddis: Starting with Microsoft Visual Basic (7th Ed.)

  • Chapter 3: Variables and Calculations
  • Chapter 4: Making Decisions
Discussion 2
  1. Suppose a number is used in calculations throughout a program and must be changed every few months. What benefit is there to using a named constant to represent the number? In replying to your peers’ benefits, think of other benefits they did not list and/or that they did list compared to your post.
  2. List and explain two Visual Basic selection statements. Provide at least one original example (outside of the textbook) for each statement you list.

Provide your initial post by Thursday evening at 11:59 p.m. CT. Reply to two of your peers by Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT.

Dropbox 3

Complete Programming Challenge 1 Miles per Gallon on page 224 of the textbook.

Follow the instructions provided in the textbook. Provide the following as comments in the beginning of your program.

‘ Name of Project:            Name the project that is assigned this week here

‘ Purpose:                          Describe what the project is doing

‘ Programmer:                  Your name and date

Dropbox 4

Complete Programming Challenge 5 Software Sales on page 303 of the textbook. 

Follow the instructions provided in the textbook.  Provide the following as comments in the beginning of your program.

‘ Name of Project:             Name the project that is assigned this week here

‘ Purpose:                           Describe what the project is doing

‘ Programmer:                   Your name and date

Readings

Gaddis: Starting with Microsoft Visual Basic (7th Ed.)

  • Chapter 5: Lists and Loops
  • Chapter 6: Procedures and Functions
Discussion 3
  1. Choose one of the loops listed on page 340, Chapter 4. Provide (a) a definition of the loop in your own words and (b) an original situation where this loop would work best. Do not copy one from the textbook. Review 2 of your peers’ loops and comment on their similarities and differences.
  2. What is the difference between an argument and a parameter variable? Where do you declare a parameter variable?

Provide your initial post by Thursday evening at 11:59 p.m. CT. Reply to two of your peers by Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT.

Dropbox 5

Complete Programming Challenge 2: Distance Calculator found on page 370-371 of the textbook.

Follow the instructions provided in the textbook.

‘ Name of Project:

‘ Purpose: Describe what the project is doing

‘ Programmer: Your name and date

Note: You will need to do this for each programming Dropbox submitted. As well as commenting your code explaining what your code is doing.

Dropbox 6

Complete Programming Challenge 2: Hospital Charges found on page 421-422 of the textbook.

Follow the instructions provided in the textbook.

‘ Name of Project:

‘ Purpose: Describe what the project is doing

‘ Programmer: Your name and date

Note: You will need to do this for each programming Dropbox submitted. As well as commenting your code explaining what your code is doing.

Readings

Gaddis: Starting with Microsoft Visual Basic (7th Ed.)

  • Chapter 7: Multiple Forms, Modules, and Menus
Discussion 4
  1. In your own words, describe the process of adding a new form to a project.
  2. In your own words, describe the process of changing the startup form to another form.

Review and reply to two of your peers letting them know if they have the processes in 1 and 2 correct, or if they need to add more information.

Provide your initial post by Thursday evening at 11:59 p.m. CT. Reply to two of your peers by Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT.

Dropbox 7

Complete programming challenge Astronomy Helper on pages 497-498 of the textbook.

Follow the instructions listed in the textbook and add the following as comments to your application.

‘ Name of Project:

‘ Purpose: Describe what the project is doing

‘ Programmer: Your name and date

Midterm Exam

The Midterm Exam is worth 100 points and consists of 50 Multiple Choice Questions. These questions are covered from readings of the textbook, specifically Chapters 1-7.

This exam is proctored, and, as such, is closed-book and computer based. Furthermore, you will need an Internet-connected computer when taking the exam, but the only window that can be opened is the exam webpage. The use of cell phones, pagers and flash drive in taking your proctored exam is prohibited.

You must have submitted the “Student Proctor Information Submission Form” to the Proctor Information Dropbox by the end of Week 2. This form and additional information about Proctoring is located in the Content area of the course.

The Midterm Exam opens on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 4 and is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday of the same week.

You will have 120 minutes to complete the exam with only one (1) attempt. 

Readings

Gaddis: Starting with Microsoft Visual Basic (7th Ed.)

  • Chapter 8: Arrays and More
  • Chapter 9: Files, Printing, and Structures
Discussion 5

We’ve seen strings that process first, middle, and last names in the array’s elements. What are some other ways we could use these arrays?

Write code that declares a string array with three to five elements and then stores those elements. Copy and paste this code into your discussion post as well a short description of its purpose.

Look at two of your peers’ declarations. Discuss the similarities and/or differences.

Provide your initial post by Thursday evening at 11:59 p.m. CT. Reply to two of your peers by Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT.

Dropbox 8

Complete Programming Challenge #11 Soccer Team Score Application found on page 571 of the textbook.

Follow the instructions provided in the textbook. To help you out a little, you could have 4 forms. Game Points form, Main form, Player form, and Player Points form. Attached are some screen shots to get you started if this is the type of design you would like to use. If not, feel free to be creative, but also make sure you meet the requirements provided in the textbook.

Include the following as comments in your program.

‘ Name of Project:

‘ Purpose: Describe what the project is doing

‘ Programmer: Your name and date

Dropbox 9

Complete programming challenge #4, Movie Collection on page 626 of the textbook.

Follow the instructions provided in the textbook. Include the following as comments in your program.

‘ Name of Project:

‘ Purpose: Describe what the project is doing

‘ Programmer: Your name and date

Readings

Gaddis: Starting with Microsoft Visual Basic (7th Ed.)

  • Chapter 12: Classes, Collections and Inheritance
Discussion 6

Look at the following problem description and identify the potential classes.  After you have them identified, write code to declare the classes.  Compare your list of classes to your peers and state if you agree/disagree with the classes they wrote.

Problem: We need to keep a list of customers and record our business transactions with them. Each time a customer purchases a product, an order is filled out.  Each order shows a list of items kept in our central warehouse.

Provide your initial post by Thursday evening at 11:59 p.m. CT. Reply to two of your peers by Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT.

Dropbox 10

Complete Programming Challenge #1: E-Mail Address Book found on page 824 of the textbook. 

Follow the instructions provided in the textbook.  Add the following as comments in your program.

‘ Name of Project:          

‘ Purpose: Describe what the project is doing

‘ Programmer: Your name and date

Readings

Gaddis: Starting with Microsoft Visual Basic (7th Ed.)

  • Chapter 10: Working with Databases
Discussion 7

Think of some ways you might use tables in Visual Basic. Now, write a SQL statement using these imagined tables.  Use the Select, Where, and Sort keywords at a minimum.  Compare your statement with 2 of your peers.  How are they the same or different?

Provide your initial post by Thursday evening at 11:59 p.m. CT. Reply to two of your peers by Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT.

Readings

Gaddis: Starting with Microsoft Visual Basic (7th Ed.)

  • Chapter 8: Arrays and More
  • Chapter 9: Files, Printing, and Structures
  • Chapter 10: Working with Databases
  • Chapter 12: Classes, Collections and Inheritance
Discussion 8

Reflect on everything you have learned in the past 8 weeks. How will you use Visual Basic programming in your future? If you will not use it, discuss how it could be used. This could be for work or personal purposes.

Provide your initial post by Thursday evening at 11:59 p.m. CT. Reply to two of your peers by Saturday, 11:59 p.m. CT.

Final Exam

The Midterm Exam is worth 100 points and consists of 50 Multiple Choice Questions. These questions are covered from readings of the textbook, specifically Chapters 8-10 and 12.

This exam is proctored, and, as such, is closed-book and computer based. Furthermore, you will need an Internet-connected computer when taking the exam, but the only window that can be opened is the exam webpage. The use of cell phones, pagers and flash drive in taking your proctored exam is prohibited.

You must have submitted the “Student Proctor Information Submission Form” to the Proctor Information Dropbox by the end of Week 2. This form and additional information about Proctoring is located in the Content area of the course.

The Final Exam opens on 12:01 a.m. CT, Monday of Week 8 and is due by 11:59 p.m. CT on Saturday of the same week.

You will have 120 minutes to complete the exam with only one (1) attempt. 

Final Project

The Final Project for this course is the creation of an employee database. This assignment will give you some insight into how Visual Basic programming can be useful in the real world.  

As you work on this application, try to make it presentable like an application you would want to use if you were using an employee database application.  Feel free to incorporate pictures to make it appeal to the user….be creative.  Keep in mind the things you learned such as tab order and exception handling for user experience on the front end.  Also, think about the coding you are doing and make sure you comment your code and follow Visual Basic standard conventions. What if a new developer were to make changes to the application?  Will they understand your intentions and what the code is doing?

Complete the following Programming Challenges:

Programming Challenge #1 - Creating Employee Data found on page 625 of the textbook.

Programming Challenge #2 - Reading Employee Data found on page 625-626 of the textbook.

Programming Challenge #12 - Employee Data, Enhanced found on page 629 of the textbook.

Specifically, be sure to meet the following criteria:

  1. Employee records must be saved to a text file.
  2. Employee records can be retrieved from the text file, display one record at a time.
  3. Employee records can be retrieved from the text file, all records at once.
  4. New employee records can be added to the text file without erasing the existing records.
  5. Users can search employee records by employee ID.
  6. Save/OpenFileDialog must be used at least once.
  7. Users can print all employee records appropriately formatted.

Most students find this easier if all three programming challenges are put into one application.  If you choose to do these as three separate applications, put each one in its own zipped file.

Good luck and have fun with your project.  I have provided a couple simple examples to get you thinking about how you can develop this application.

The Final Project is due by 11:59 p.m. CT, Thursday of Week 8.

  Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a cumulative process that begins with the first college learning opportunity. Students are responsible for knowing the Academic Integrity policy and procedures and may not use ignorance of either as an excuse for academic misconduct. Columbia College recognizes that the vast majority of students at Columbia College maintain high ethical academic standards; however, failure to abide by the prohibitions listed herein is considered academic misconduct and may result in disciplinary action, a failing grade on the assignment, and/or a grade of "F" for the course.

Additionally, all required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments.

Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks.

You must keep up with the schedule of reading, writing, and programming to successfully complete the class.

  • No late discussion posts will be accepted.
  • No late assignments will be accepted without extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the student and with instructor notification prior to the due date.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.

  Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance.  If you have questions about the Ed Map storefront, please contact the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center.  If you have technical problems with the VitalSource eText reader, please contact VitalSource.  Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.