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Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2017/2018

BUSI 506: Legal & Ethical Environment

Course Description

Examination of topics in the area of law, regulatory controls, and ethical issues. Topics include contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, agency agreements, partnerships, corporations and product liability. Discussions focus on the implications of these legal situations in management.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Clarkson, Miller, and Cross. Business Law: Text and Cases. 14th. Cengage Learning, 2017.
    • ISBN-978-1-305-96725-0

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.

Library Databases

Columbia College’s Library Databases are available to assist you with your research. You may access them using your CougarTrack login and password when prompted.

Course Overview

To help the student succeed in the learning objectives, this course is divided into 5 parts: Alternative Dispute Resolution, Courts and Court Procedure, Real Property and Insurance Law, Contract Law, and Labor and Employment Law. Alternative Dispute Resolution provides the student exposure to alternative methods of resolving legal disputes. This section will focus on the different types of alternative dispute resolution and the advantages and disadvantages to the different methods. This part will also provide the student the opportunity to engage in negotiations and mediations with their fellow on-line classmates. Courts and Court Procedure provides the student exposure to the courts and the stages of litigation. This section focuses on how the Court System impacts the business community and the strategies necessary to maximize the legal representation of the business organization. Real Property Law and Insurance provides opportunities for discussion and exploration of real property and insurance law. The student will analyze Landlord-Tenant relationships and learn how to deal with insurance issues as it relates to business transactions. This section will focus on the application of legal principles to hypothetical cases. Employment and Labor Law provides the student exposure to Federal statutes in the area of employment and labor. Actual appellate cases are discussed and analyzed as tools for managing employment and labor issues in the business community. Each student will be assigned an employment issue requiring legal research and drafting of a legal memo to share. The final part, Contract Law provides the student with detailed exposure to formation and defenses to contracts and the emerging laws of E-Contracts. This section will focus on the application of contract principles to hypothetical cases. In summary, this course is structured to allow students to learn about distinct areas of law and their application to real world business issues. The course is designed to encourage analytical reasoning and discussion.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To learn the legal and ethical context of how the internal and external environment affect business decision-making.
  • To develop practical materials on business ethics and a working knowledge of the legal environment for business transactions and decision-making.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Appraise the fundamental principles of business law
  • Describe and explain Civil Procedure
  • Explain the major employment laws
  • Analyze the topic of torts and contract
  • Explain basic real estate law
  • Explain the process of alternative dispute resolution

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
F 0-699 0-69%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Dropbox Assignments 275 28%
Discussion Posts 200 20%
Negotiation 25 2%
Exams 350 35%
Employment Law Project 150 15%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 & responses: Introductions 0 Wednesday/Sunday
Dropbox 1: Jurisdiction Statute 25 Sunday
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 & responses 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Dropbox 2: Negotiation Problem 25 Sunday
Dropbox 3: Questions Chapter 3 25
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 & responses 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 4 & responses 20
Dropbox 4: Questions Chapter 49 25 Sunday
Dropbox 5: Questions Chapter 50 25
Exam 1 - Objective 75
Exam 1 - Essay 50
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 & responses 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 6 & responses 20
Dropbox 6: Questions Chapter 34 & 35 25 Sunday
Dropbox 7: Questions Chapter 34 25
Exam II - Objective 75
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 & responses 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 8 & responses 20
Dropbox 8: Case Problem Chapter 11 25 Sunday
Dropbox 9: Case Problem Chapter 12 & 13 25
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 & responses 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 10 & responses 20
Dropbox 10: Questions Chapter 14 & 16 25 Sunday
Dropbox 11: Case Problem Chapter 16 25
Employment Law Research Project: Preliminary Research 0
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 & responses 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 12 & responses 20
Dropbox 12: Case Problem Chapter 18 25 Sunday
Employment Law Research Project: Legal Memo Outline 0
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13: Employment Law Research Project PowerPoint Slide Show & responses 50 Wednesday/Saturday
Employment Law Research Project: Final Project 100 Saturday
Exam III - Objective 75
Exam III - Essay 75
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Readings

Each week you have assigned chapters in the text. In addition to the text, Instructor Notes will be provided that complement the text.

Discussions

There are twelve graded discussions in this course. To receive the maximum points for each discussion question posted, the response must be supported by related material from the text and other competent sources. The response must be original, well thought out, and complete. Most importantly, students must post responses to two other student comments. Responses such as “Good idea” or “I agree with you” are supportive to your fellow students, but that alone is insufficient to earn points. You should engage your fellow learners in a relevant discussion based upon their comments and your additional research. Late discussion posts will not be accepted.

Dropbox Assignments

Dropbox Assignments will vary depending upon the chapter and legal principle. Be sure to read all directions and follow them thoroughly. The focus will be your legal analysis and conclusions. “It could go either way “is not acceptable. When complete, they should be placed as .doc or .pdf files into the Dropbox. Consider the work formal and strive to put your best writing forward, carefully proofread. APA format is recommended.

To view the full text of any of the cases cited throughout the Discussion or Dropbox Assignments: go to Lexis-Nexis Academic Legal Search at the Library Resource Page on the Columbia College Homepage.


Exams

Exams will be required during weeks 3, 4, and 8. The first and last exam will have an objective section and an Essay component that must be submitted to the Dropbox. The exam during Week 4 is objective only.

Employment Law Research Project

You will be assigned an employment claim made by an employee. As legal counsel for the Company you are required to advise the Company whether the employee or the employer will prevail should litigation be pursued. To determine that answer, you are required to research applicable state and federal laws and statutes, as well as recent articles. After completing the research, you will turn in a correctly formatted Legal Memo that includes your legal opinion about what claims could be made and how likely the claimant is to prevail based upon your research. You will also be required to do a PowerPoint presentation for your classmates. The Memo should be placed in the Dropbox and the PowerPoint Presentation in the Discussion Thread.


Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Courts and Jurisdiction
Readings

Read Chapters 2 and 3 in your text.

Discussion 1 & responses: Introductions
Introduce yourself to the class. Please give us more than your name. Include your profession, interests, and any other information that will help us get to know you. Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.
Dropbox 1: Jurisdiction Statute

In order to have jurisdiction over the parties (in personam jurisdiction) the out of state defendant must have minimum contacts with the state. Look up Missouri’s statutes (or your own state of residency if you choose to do so) to determine what are the “minimum contacts” required to bring an out of state defendant into Missouri. Due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.

Note: All state statutes are available through the Library Resource Page on the Columbia College Homepage. Go to Databases A-Z. Scroll down to Lexis-Nexis Academic Legal Search. Go to State Statutes, Codes and Regulations. Your keyword search should be “personal jurisdiction” (make sure your state dropdown menu is set to “Missouri”). Scroll through the choices until you find § 506.500 R.S.Mo.

This will also give you some experience in using this website which will be your primary source in your Employment law research project.

Week 2: Court Procedure and Alternative Dispute Resolution
Readings

Read Chapters 2 and 3 in your text.  Also read About Mediate.com.

Discussion 2 & responses
From your readings in Chapter 2 about jurisdiction, respond to the following: You are a member of MySpace.com. A fellow member has made statements about your character which you believe to be defamatory. You wish to sue that individual as well as “MySpace” in your state of residency. Based on your readings, do you have jurisdiction in your state of residency? Why or why not? Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.
Dropbox 2: Negotiation Problem

The following placement ad in a Missouri Bar journal has been posted:

Assistant Attorney General – Attorney for the Labor Division, Kansas City office, to handle workers’ compensation cases. This is a job-share position with a part-time schedule and full benefits. The position provides an outstanding opportunity to develop valuable experience in a first-chair litigation role. The successful candidate will defend the state Second Injury Fund on behalf of the state treasurer and defend the state’s Central Accident Reporting Office in workers’ compensation claims. Experience preferred.

Instructions:

Each of you will receive via email, some confidential information known only to your role. This information should be used only as a tool for negotiation. Along with the confidential information you will be notified with which student you are to negotiate. You have until 11:59 pm CT Sunday to complete your negotiation and provide answers to the following questions:

  1. Were you the Job Applicant or the Director in Charge of Hiring for the Second Injury Fund?
  2. Who was your on-line negotiation partner?
  3. Did you reach an agreement? If so what were the terms? If not, why not?
  4. Explain briefly the course of your negotiation.
  5. What negotiation tools did you use in attempting to reach your goals?
  6. Were you satisfied with the outcome?
  7. Is there anything you would do differently?
  8. Any observations or comments.
Dropbox 3: Questions Chapter 3
Case Problems: Go to page 68-69 in text, answer questions 3-3 and 3-9. Place your work in the Dropbox by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Week 3: Real Property, Landlord/Tenant Relationships, and Insurance
Readings

Read Chapters 49 and 50

Discussion 3 & responses

Kelo v. City of New London, Connecticut

A Connecticut state agency designated the city of New London a “distressed municipality,” and in 1996, the federal government closed a naval facility in the Fort Trumbull area of the city. In 1998, Pfizer Inc. announced that it would build a $300 million facility on a site next to Fort Trumbull. Hoping to attract businesses, the city council approved a plan to redevelop the area that once housed the federal facility. When negotiations with some of the owners fell through, the city began condemnation proceedings. Susette Kelo and others filed a suit in a Connecticut state court against the city and others. The plaintiffs claimed, among other things, that taking their property would violate the “public use” restriction in the U.S. Constitution’s Fifth Amendment. The court ruled in favor of both sides. On appeal, the Connecticut Supreme Court held that the proposed takings were valid. The owners appealed.

The United States Supreme Court affirmed. Economic development can constitute “public use” within the meaning of the Fifth Amendment’s takings clause to justify a local government’s exercise of its power of eminent domain to take private property. The development “unquestionably serves a public purpose,” even though it would also benefit private parties. “Viewed as a whole, our jurisprudence has recognized that the needs of society have varied between different parts of the Nation, just as they have evolved over time in response to changed circumstances. Our earliest cases in particular embodied a strong theme of federalism, emphasizing the great respect that we owe to state legislatures and state courts in discerning local public needs. For more than a century, our public use jurisprudence has wisely eschewed rigid formulas and intrusive scrutiny in favor of affording legislatures broad latitude in determining what public needs justify the use of the takings power.”

The plaintiffs urged the courts to “adopt a new bright-line rule that economic development does not qualify as a public use,” but the Court chose not to do this. Why? “Promoting economic development is a traditional and long accepted function of government. There is, moreover, no principled way of distinguishing economic development from the other public purposes that we have recognized. In our cases upholding takings that facilitated agriculture and mining, for example, we emphasized the importance of those industries to the welfare of the States in question; [and in a third case] we endorsed the purpose of transforming a blighted area into a well-balanced community through redevelopment . . . . It would be incongruous to hold that the City's interest in the economic benefits to be derived from the development of the Fort Trumbell area...

  1. Why did the United States Supreme Court grant certiorari in this case, and what did the Court hold with respect to the principal issue?
  2. Considering the impact of the ruling in this case, what are some arguments against the decision?

Post your responses to questions 1 and 2 in the discussion thread. Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 4 & responses
Go to page 970-971 in your text read Case 50.2, Estate of Luster v. Allstate Insurance Co. Post your responses to questions 1, 2, and 3 in the discussion thread. Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.
Dropbox 4: Questions Chapter 49
Chapter 49: Go to page 959-960 in text. Answer questions 49-1 and 49-10. Please note question 49.10 is not a group activity. Each student must answer parts a, b, and c. Due before 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Dropbox 5: Questions Chapter 50
Chapter 50: Go to page 975 in text. Answer question 50-4. Due before 11:59 CT Sunday.
Exam 1 - Objective

Objective portion (True-False and Multiple Choice) covers chapters 2, 3, 49 and 50. Complete by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Exam 1 - Essay

Essay Section covers chapters 2, 3, 49 and 50. Post to the Answer Box in the Essay Section of the Quizzes by Sunday, 11:59 pm CT.

Week 4: Labor & Employment Law and Employment Discrimination
Readings

Read Chapters 34 and 35

Discussion 5 & responses

Go to page 682 in your text to “Reviewing Employment Discrimination.” Post your responses to questions 1-4 on the discussion thread referencing your text and the case of Lyle v. Warner Bros. Television Productions, 132 P.3d 211 Cal., 2006. Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 6 & responses

EEOC v. Walmart

Cerebral Palsy limits Steven Bradley’s use of his legs. He uses forearm crutches for short-distance walks and a wheelchair for longer distances. Standing for more than ten or fifteen minutes is difficult. With support, however, Bradley can climb stairs and get on and off a stool. His condition also restricts the use of his fourth finger to, for example, type, but it does not limit his ability to write – he completed two years of college. His grip strength is normal and he can lift heavy objects.

In 2001, Bradley applied for a “greeter” or “cashier” position at a Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., Supercenter in Richmond, Missouri. The job description stated, “No experience or qualification is required”. Bradley indicated that he was available for full or part-time work from 4:00 pm to 10:00 pm any evenings.

His employment history showed that he currently worked as a proofreader and that he had previously worked as an administrator. His application was rejected, according to Janet Daugherty, the personnel manager, based on his “work history” and the “direct threat” that he posed to the safety of himself and others. Bradley claims, however, that the store refused to hire him due to his disability. EEOC v. Walmart Store Inc., 477 F.3d 561

  1. What steps must Bradley follow to pursue his claim?
  2. What does he need to show to prevail?
  3. Is he likely to meet these requirements?

Post your responses to Questions 1-3 in the discussion thread. Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.

Dropbox 6: Questions Chapter 34 & 35

Chapter 34: Go to page 662 and answer question 34-2 and 34-4. Due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.

Chapter 35: Go to page 673 in your text and answer Critical Thinking Questions. Due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.

Dropbox 7: Questions Chapter 34
Go to page 661 in your text to “Reviewing: Employment, Immigration and Labor Law. Post your responses to the questions 1, 2, 3, and 4 in the dropbox. Due before 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Exam II - Objective
Objective only over chapters 34 and 35. Due before 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Employment Law Research Project Assigned

See Content area for more detail and assignment of specific claims. Students are required to complete a research project that deals with different issues of employment law. The project requires that you act as legal counsel for ABC Corporation. As counsel, you will receive a claim from one of the branches of your Company. The CEO has asked you to research the case law (both State and Federal), statutes (both State and Federal), and recent newspaper and journal articles relating to those particular claims. You are to prepare a typewritten memo with your legal opinions on what claims could be made by the claimant and whether the claimant will prevail citing case law (at least three cases), Federal and State statutes if applicable, and other topical materials if applicable. The format should be memo format with Proposed Legal Issue/Question, Legal Answer, case laws in support of that answer, proposed solution and resources cited.

The second portion of the project will be to submit a PowerPoint summary slide show to the CEO and the Board of Directors (your instructor and fellow students). This presentation should follow a much shorter but similar format to your memo, stating the facts, possible causes of action, your legal opinion on whether the claimant will prevail, your support for that legal opinion and your proposed solution. This portion should be submitted to the Desire2learn (D2L) discussion site. Students are required to complete and place in the Dropbox their preliminary research by Week 6. Students are required to complete and place in the Dropbox an outline of their memo no later than the end of Week Seven.

Week 5: Contracts—Nature and Terminology, Agreement, Consideration
Readings

Read Chapters 11, 12, and 13

Discussion 7 & responses
Go to page 248 in your text. Answer Questions to Problem 12-3. Post your responses to the discussion thread. Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.
Discussion 8 & responses
Go to page 250-251 in your text. Read Case 13.1 Hamer v. Sidway, and post your response to the question posed at the end of the case: “What if the facts were different?” Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.
Dropbox 8: Case Problem Chapter 11
Go to page 228 in your text. Read "Reviewing: Nature and Terminology." Post your response to question 1 – 4 in the dropbox. Due before before 11:59pm CT Sunday.
Dropbox 9: Case Problem Chapter 12 & 13

Go to page 248 in your text. Answer Case Problem 12-2. Post your response to the dropbox. Due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.

Go to page 261 in your text. Answer Case Scenario 13-2. Post your response to the dropbox. Due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.

Week 6: Labor & Employment Law and Employment Discrimination
Readings

Read Chapter 14, 15, & 16

Discussion 9 & responses
Go to page 273-274 in your text. Read Case 14.3 Holmes v. Multimedia KSDK, Inc. Answer legal reasoning questions 1-3. Post your response to the discussion thread. Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59 pm CT Sunday. Note: To view the full text of this case and other cases throughout the semester, go to Lexis-Nexis Academic Legal Search at the Library Resource Page on the Columbia College Homepage.
Discussion 10 & responses
Go to page 291-293 in your text. "Reviewing: Mistakes, Fraud and Voluntary Consent." Answer Questions 1-4 and post your response to the discussion thread. Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.
Dropbox 10: Questions Chapter 14 & 16
Go to page 278 in your text. Answer Question 14-2. Go to page 307 in your text and answer 16-1 (a) (b) and (c). Due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.
Dropbox 11: Case Problem Chapter 16
Go to page 306 in your text: "Reviewing: The Writing Requirement in Our Digital World." Answer Questions 1-4. Due before 11:59 CT Sunday.
Employment Law Research Project: Preliminary Research
Preliminary research due in Dropbox before 11:59pm CT Sunday for instructor’s review.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Contracts—Third Party Rights, Performance and Discharge
Readings

Read Chapter 17 & 18

Discussion 11 & responses

Assignment - LeMieux v Tri-State Lotto Commission, 666A.2d 1170

Facts: Joseph LeMieux, of Maine, won $373,000 in a lottery operated by the Tri-State Lotto Commission. The lottery is sponsored by the three northern New England states and is administered in Vermont. In accordance with its usual payment plan, Tri-State was to pay the $375,000 to LeMieux in annual installments over a twenty-year period. LeMieux assigned his rights to the lottery payments for the years 1996 through 2006 to Singer Freidlander Corp. for the sum of $80,000. LeMieux and Singer Freidlander (the plaintiffs) sought a court judgment authorizing their assignment agreement despite Tri-State’s regulation barring the assignment of lottery proceeds. The trial court granted Tri-State’s motion for summary judgment. On appeal, the plaintiffs argued that Tri-State’s regulation was invalid.

Questions for Discussion: Was the assignment invalid? Discuss fully and contrast with Walker v. Roger. See the facts below:

In the case of Walker v. Rogers, Walker won $ 1,197,790 in the Illinois State Lottery. The prize was payable in 20 annual installments of $ 59,889. In June 1993, Walker entered into a contract with R&P, whereby Walker agreed to assign his right to a $ 30,000 portion of each of the 12 remaining payments to R&P in exchange for a lump-sum payment of $ 135,000.

The Illinois State Lottery statute had the following language:

"No prize, nor any portion of a prize, nor any right of any [***7] person to a prize awarded shall be assignable [(clause one)]. Any prize, or portion thereof remaining unpaid at the death of a prize winner, may be paid to the estate of such deceased prize winner or to the trustee under a revocable living trust..."

Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 12 & responses
Go to page 320 in your text. Reviewing Third Party Rights. Post your answers to questions 1-4 to the discussion thread. Due before 11:59 pm CT Wednesday. Responses due before 11:59pm CT Sunday.
Dropbox 12: Case Problem Chapter 18
Go to page 336 in your text. Answer question 18-3 (a) (b) (c) and (d). Due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Employment Law Research Project: Legal Memo Outline
Students are required to complete and place in the Dropbox an outline of their memo no later than 11:59pm CT Sunday.
Week 8: Contracts—Third Party Rights, Performance and Discharge
Readings

Read Chapter 18

Discussion 13: Employment Law Research Project PowerPoint Slide Show & responses
Post your Employment Law Summary slide show presentation to discussion thread by Wednesday, 11:59 pm CT. Also, review at least 2 employment law summaries created by your fellow students, and post your comments, observations and questions by Saturday, 11:59 pm CT.
Employment Law Research Project: Final Project
Final project with supporting research due by 11:59 pm CT Saturday.
Exam III - Objective
Objective portion (True-False and Multiple Choice) covers chapters 11-18, due before 11:59 pm CT Saturday.
Exam III - Essay
Essay Section covers chapters 11-18, due before 11:59pm CT Saturday. Post to the Answer Box in the Essay Section of the Quizzes.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Any assignment submitted late will result in the grade being reduced by half. All late assignments are worth only 50% of the original potential points possible. You have only one week to submit late work; after one week, the assignment is worth zero points.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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