Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

ASTR 108: Introduction To Astronomy

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  Course Description

A survey of the development of astronomy through the years. Topics covered include the historical evolution of our understanding of our place in the Universe, astronomical instruments, the Earth-Moon system, the solar system, the Sun and other stars, galaxies and cosmology.  G.E.

Prerequisite: MATH 106 or higher

Proctored Exams: Midterm and Final



  Textbooks

As part of TruitionSM, students will receive their course materials automatically as described below.

Required

  •  Comins, N. & Kaufmann III, W. (2014). Discovering the Universe (10th). New York, NY: W.H. Freeman.  eText

Bookstore Information

Visit https://www.ccis.edu/bookstore.aspx for details.

eText Information

If a course uses an eText, (see Textbook information above) the book will be available directly in Desire2Learn (D2L) and through the VitalSource eText reader the Friday before the session begins, if registered for courses prior to that date.  Students will have a VitalSource account created for them using their CougarMail email address. Upon first login to VitalSource, students may need to verify their account and update their VitalSource password.  More information about how to use the VitalSource platform, including offline access to eTexts, can be found in D2L.  Students that would like to order an optional print-on-demand copy of eligible eTexts can do so through the VitalSource bookshelf at an additional cost.  Once orders are placed, it can take approximately five to seven business days for students to receive their print-on-demand books.

Physical Course Materials Information

Students enrolled in courses that require physical materials will receive these materials automatically at the address on file with Columbia College.  Delivery date of physical materials is dependent on registration date and shipping location.  Please refer to confirmation emails sent from Ed Map for more details on shipping status.

Returns: Students who drop a course with physical course materials will be responsible for returning those items to Ed Map within 30 days of receipt of the order.  More specific information on how to do so will be included in the package received from Ed Map.  See here for Ed Map's return policy. Failure to return physical items from a dropped course will result in a charge to the student account for all unreturned items.

Note: Students who opt-out of having their books provided as part of TruitionSM are responsible for purchasing their own course materials.

  Course Overview

This course is designed to provide you with a broad overview of the science of astronomy. This is a conceptual course which means it will focus on the important top level concepts of astronomy and not delve into the deeper physics and mathematics behind the broader concepts. The course will cover our present understanding of the solar system and its formation, stars and their formation, our galaxy, and the known universe. Also covered will be the methods, tools, and instruments by which scientists have expanded our knowledge of astronomy from the early beginnings up to present day. Each week you will be given a reading assignment, one discussion topic, and a homework assignment related to the readings. There will be seven short quizzes and a proctored midterm and final exam.

Topics covered by the course include those listed below.

  • Time and space
  • General discussion about the composition of the universe
  • Discussion about different branches of astronomy
  • Solar system overview
  • Different planets, their satellites, and the Sun
  • Asteroids, comets, and meteors
  • Stars and galaxies
  • Origin and structure of the universe

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another MS Word compatible word processing program

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Examine the major types of objects in the universe and their properties
  2. Outline basic physical principles underlying astronomical theories and methods of observation
  3. Describe instruments and methods used by observational astronomers
  4. Investigate scientific theories on the origin and structure of the universe, and how these have evolved over time

  Grading

Grading Scale

Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (8) 160 16%
Homework Assignments (8) 200 20%
Quizzes (7) 210 21%
Midterm Exam (1) 215 22%
Final Exam (1) 215 22%
Total 1000 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion -- Friday/Sunday
Discussion 1 20
Homework 1 25 Sunday
Quiz 1 30

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 20 Friday/Sunday
Homework 2 25 Sunday
Quiz 2 30
Proctor Information N/A

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 20 Friday/Sunday
Homework 3 25 Sunday
Quiz 3 30

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 20 Friday/Sunday
Homework 4 25 Sunday
Quiz 4 30
Midterm Exam 215

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 20 Friday/Sunday
Homework 5 25 Sunday
Quiz 5 30

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6 20 Friday/Sunday
Homework 6 25 Sunday
Quiz 6 30

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 20 Friday/Sunday
Homework 7 25 Sunday
Quiz 7 30

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 20 Friday/Saturday
Homework 8 25 Saturday
Final Exam 215
Total Points: 1000

  Assignment Overview

Discussions

In the first week of class, you will participate in a personal introduction discussion to include your profession, family ties, where you live, educational background and goals, background in astronomy, and personal goals for the class. You are expected to respond to at least three other students' postings. This is a very important activity in establishing class relationships for future topic class interactions. Your initial post is due by Friday at 11:59 PM Central Time (CT) of Week 1. Your responses to your classmates should be posted by Sunday at 11:59 PM CT of Week 1.

Each week, you will discuss a significant astronomical concept addressing how it came to be, when it was developed, its current status, and how it may have evolved over time. You will choose one of four topics provided. Your initial posting should be presented like a term paper in terms of theme and form and should have three or more paragraphs consisting of four (4) to five (5) sentences each. Your initial postings are due by Fridays at 11:59 PM CT. You must respond to at least three (3) other student postings. Your responses must be directed at scientific aspects of the original post. When possible, at least one (1) response must address a topic that is different from your original post. Your responses are due by Sunday at 11:59 PM CT. No late discussion posts will be accepted.

All postings must be in your own words with a minimal use of quotations. Any quotations must be properly cited using the APA format. You will find a quick guide to the APA style in the Content area of the course. Each of the eight (8) weekly discussions will be worth 20 points for a total of 160 points which is 16% of the course grade. Points lost in the original post may be regained by submitting a clarification posting that addresses deficiencies in the original post as noted by the instructor. This clarification must address only the deficiencies noted and must be posted as a response to the instructor's comment. The original post should not be edited after the instructor evaluation has been completed. Clarifications for credit may be submitted anytime within one (1) week of the due date of the original post.

Homework

Each week there will be one graded homework assignment consisting of five (5) to ten (10) questions related to the assigned readings for the week. Your answers are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of the concept involved in your own words, not a series of quotes from reference sources. If an occasional quote is used, then the quote should be appropriately referenced in APA format. The paper submitted should be a Microsoft Word document of the downloaded assignment file with the answers entered into the file. If the downloaded file is not used, then the submitted document must be formatted like the assignment file with the questions numbered and stated as they are in the assignment file.

Each assignment is due Sunday at 11:59 PM CT of the appropriate week and should be posted to the appropriate Dropbox in the course. No papers will be accepted by email. Assignments submitted after the Sunday 11:59 PM CT due date/time will be penalized the point equivalent of 5% for each day or partial day the submission is late. There will be no credit given for postings submitted more than three (3) days after the paper due date/time. Each of the eight (8) homework assignments will be worth 25 points for a total of 200 points which is 20% of the course grade.

Rubric for each question will be as follows:

• 40% of question pts.  -  Extent to which the answer addresses the major scientific concepts related to the question.
• 30% of question pts.  -  Accuracy and completeness of scientific argument presented.
• 15% of question pts.  -  Originality of answers (extent to which answers are in the student’s own words with minimal use of direct quotes)
• 15% of question pts.  -  Paper structure including consistent formatting, logical structure, correct spelling, correct grammar, and appropriate references for any quotes included.

Quizzes

Each week there will be one (1) quiz consisting of five (5) to ten (10) multiple choice or true/false questions related to the assigned readings for the week. There is a time limit of 15 minutes. Answers entered after this time limit will not be recorded. Only one attempt will be allowed. Once the quiz is started, it must be completed. Quizzes become available at 12:01 AM CT on Wednesday of each week and must be taken by Sunday at 11:59 PM CT of the week in which it is assigned. No late submissions are allowed without approval of the instructor prior to the due date/time.

The quiz will be automatically scored by the course environment and the score will be available to the student as soon as the quiz is submitted.

Each quiz is worth 30 points. Since there are seven (7) of these quizzes, there is a total of 210 points to be earned from quizzes or 21% of the overall course grade.

Exams

The course has both a midterm (covering Weeks 1-4) and a final exam (covering Weeks 5-8). These exams must be proctored by the proctor approved by the course instructor. Standard Proctor Request forms must be submitted with the required information and posted to the Dropbox provided for proctor requests in Week 2. An email posting of requests is not acceptable.

The exams will consist of multiple choice or true/false questions. There will also be a few fill-in-the-blank type questions dealing with terminology. There are no mathematical calculations required. Each exam will have a strictly enforced 60 minute time limit. Any entries made to the exam after the time limit expires will not be recorded. The midterm exam will become available on Tuesday of the fourth week and will remain available until Sunday at 11:59 PM CT. The final exam will become available at 12:01 AM CT on Tuesday of the last week of the course and will remain available until Saturday at 11:59 PM CT. Each exam is worth 215 points which represents 21.5% of the course grade (a total of 43% for both exams).

  Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Readings

Textbook, Chapters 1 & 2

Introduction Discussion

Post a personal introduction which includes your profession, family ties, where you live, educational background and goals, background in astronomy, and personal goals for the class.

Discussion 1

Select one of the discussion topics from the following options. Your topic should be addressed in sufficient detail to fully describe the properties of the concepts involved and should have three or more paragraphs consisting of four (4) to five (5) sentences each. The posting should be in your own words with minimal use of quotes. You must respond to at least three (3) other postings. To the extent possible based on the other class postings,  your responses must address a topic different from your original posting:

a) Discuss the concept of the constellation as it was in ancient times along with a description of two constellation examples. Also describe the current concept of a constellation; compare/contrast this current definition with the older definition specifically addressing how the new definition impacts the examples previously described for the older definition. The use of graphical representations of the topic is recommended.

b) The calendar commonly used by humans can be roughly described as an organizational structure of time. Describe this organizational structure of time; relate each of these time units to the astronomical events that were the basis for their adoption. Include in your discussion any variability in these time units, the cause for the variability, and the workarounds adopted to compensate for the variability. Use of graphic figures in support of the description recommended but not required.

c) When we measure the orbital period of objects within our solar system, there are two commonly used measurements – synodic and sidereal. Describe each of these methods, commenting on why two methods are required and how they are measured. Also address which of the two is a real parameter, which is apparent, and why. Give an example of each parameter for the Moon, an inferior planet, and a superior planet. Use of graphic figures is optional; use them if they will aid in your discussion.

d) Between roughly 1500 and 1700 AD one might say the science of astronomy was born due to the rapid and profound developments of the period, beginning with Copernicus and ending with Newton. Physical laws emerged which explained many of the inadequately explained observations of the time. Two of the more profound developments were the laws of Johannes Kepler and Isaac Newton. Describe Kepler’s Three Laws, Newton’s Laws of Motion, and Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation. Description should include the laws as stated and their practical significance relative to solar-system observations. Use of graphics to aid in explanation is recommended but not required.

Worth 20 points.

Homework 1

This assignment can be found in the Content area of the course. You will answer five to ten questions relating to Chapters 1 & 2. Your answers are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of the concept involved in your own words, and not be simply a series of quotes from the reference sources. Refer to the assignment expectations for additional guidelines. This assignment is worth 25 points.

Quiz 1

This quiz covers the Syllabus and the Assignment Expectations found in the "Start Here" module in the Content area of the course. It is not related to any assigned textbook readings. The intent of the quiz is to test your knowledge of the course rules and requirements to minimize a loss of grade points due to a lack of understanding of what is required. The quiz consists of approximately ten (10) multiple choice questions and is open resource. There is a three hour time limit to allow time to access resources. It may be re-taken twice so that any incorrect answers can be researched and corrected. The quiz is worth 30 points.

Readings

Textbook, Chapters 3 & 4
Graphics on Doppler Shift
Graphics on atomic structure and spectra

Discussion 2

Select one of the discussion topics from the following options. Your topic should be addressed in sufficient detail to fully describe the properties of the concepts involved and should be at least three paragraphs with four (4) to five (5) sentences each. The posting should be in your own words with minimal use of quotes. You must respond to at least three (3) other postings. To the extent possible based on the other class postings,  your responses must address a topic different from your original posting:

a) Discuss the structural properties of the electromagnetic spectrum and how the various segments contribute to astronomical observations. Discussion should also address the relative energy levels of the various segments. Use of graphic figures may be used in support of the description.

b) There are many types of telescopes used in astronomy. Describe each of the significant types, how they are constructed, and the portions of the electromagnetic spectrum that they are used to observe.

c) Spectral lines are one of the key properties of matter. Describe how they are produced related to the structure of the atom. Also, address the various ways they are used as tools in astronomy.

d) The Doppler Effect is one of the most important tools in astronomy. Describe its cause and the ways it is used to broaden our understanding of our galaxy and the universe. 

Worth 20 points.

Homework 2

This assignment can be found in the Content area of the course. You will answer five to ten questions relating to Chapters 3 & 4. Your answers are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of the concept involved in your own words, and not be simply a series of quotes from the reference sources. Refer to the assignment expectations for additional guidelines. This assignment is worth 25 points.

Quiz 2

This quiz consists of five (5) to ten (10) multiple choice or true/false questions covering Chapters 1-4. There is a fifteen minute (15) time limit.  Only one (1) attempt is allowed. Once the quiz is started, it must be completed. Scores will be immediately available upon submission. Worth 30 points.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Readings

Textbook, Chapters 5 & 6

Discussion 3

Select one of the discussion topics from the following options. Your topic should be addressed in sufficient detail to fully describe the properties of the concepts involved and should be at least three paragraphs with four (4) to five (5) sentences each. The posting should be in your own words with minimal use of quotes. You must respond to at least three (3) other postings. To the extent possible based on the other class postings,   your responses must address a topic different from your original posting:

a)  Describe the key steps in the formation of our solar system according to the solar nebula theory. Discussion should address how the Sun developed into the Sun we have today. Address how the planets formed and how we ended up with two distinctly different planet types, and why those planets all orbit in the same orbital plane and direction.

b)  Describe what is meant by the term "exoplanet". There are several common methods used to discover exoplanets; name each method and describe how each allows us to determine the existence of these objects. Comment on the difference between exoplanets and rogue planets.

c)  Earth has changed in many ways since its initial formation. Discuss how the properties of the interior and atmosphere have evolved over the 4 billion year history of the planet.

d)  Several different methods have been proposed for the formation of our Moon. Discuss the concept of each of these various mechanisms and why they do or don’t make sense.

e)  Direct measurement of the distance of the Moon from the Earth have shown that the Moon is moving further from the Earth each year. Describe how these measurements are made and what the likely ultimate outcome of this process will be.

Worth 20 points.

Homework 3

This assignment can be found in the Content area of the course. You will answer five to ten questions relating to Chapters 5 & 6. Your answers are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of the concept involved in your own words, and not be simply a series of quotes from the reference sources. Refer to the assignment expectations for additional guidelines. This assignment is worth 25 points.

Quiz 3

This quiz consists of five (5) to ten (10) multiple choice or true/false questions covering Chapters 5 & 6. There is a fifteen minute (15) time limit. Only one (1) attempt is allowed. Once the quiz is started, it must be completed. Scores will be immediately available upon submission. Worth 30 points.

Readings

Textbook, Chapters 7 & 8

Discussion 4

Select one of the discussion topics from the following options. Your topic should be addressed in sufficient detail to fully describe the properties of the concepts involved. The posting should be in your own words with minimal use of quotes. You must respond to at least three (3) other postings. To the extent possible based on the other class postings,  your responses must address a topic different from your original posting:

a)  Describe the major properties of the terrestrial planets addressing their composition, relative size, atmospheres, location within the solar system, and satellites, and any unique characteristics.

b)  Describe the major properties of the Jovian planets addressing their composition, size, atmospheres, location within the solar system, satellites, and why they are so different from the terrestrials in both size and chemical composition, and any unique characteristics.

c)  Discuss the major moons of the Jovian planets addressing size, chemical composition, orbital characteristics, and any unique characteristics.

d)  Compare and contrast Jupiter and its major satellites with the solar system as a whole.

Worth 20 points

Homework 4

This assignment can be found in the Content area of the course. You will answer five to ten questions relating to Chapters 7 & 8. Your answers are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of the concept involved in your own words, and not be simply a series of quotes from the reference sources. Refer to the assignment expectations for additional guidelines. This assignment is worth 25 points.

Quiz 4

This quiz consists of five (5) to ten (10) multiple choice or true/false questions covering Chapters 7 & 8. There is a fifteen minute (15) time limit. Only one (1) attempt is allowed. Once the quiz is started, it must be completed. Scores will be immediately available upon submission. Worth 30 points.

Midterm Exam

This is a proctored exam. The proctor must be approved by the class instructor. You must submit your Proctor Request form to the appropriate Dropbox in the course by the end of Week 2. Please see the Content area of the course for more information.

The midterm exam covers materials from Weeks 1-4. The questions are a variety of short answer, multiple choice, and true/false. No mathematical calculations will be required. There is a 60 minute time limit. The exam will be available from Tuesday at 12:01 AM CT until Sunday at 11:59 PM CT of Week 4. The submission view of the test will be available after the exam closes. This view will reflect questions answered incorrectly along with the correct answers for those questions. Worth 215 points.

Readings

Textbook, Chapters 9 & 10

Discussion 5

Select one of the discussion topics from the following options. Your topic should be addressed in sufficient detail to fully describe the properties of the concepts involved. The posting should be in your own words with minimal use of quotes. You must respond to at least three (3) other postings. To the extent possible based on the other class postings,  your responses must address a topic different from your original posting:

a)  Address the history and current status of the objects known as Dwarf Planets to include their definition, why the classification was created, currently known examples, and where they are located.

b)  Describe the various kinds of SSSB’s found in our solar system including their composition, where they are found, and their behavior.

c)  The atmospheric regions of the Sun are those regions above the apparent surface of the Sun (the photosphere). Describe these atmospheric regions including relative location, size, and temperature.

d)  The interior regions of the Sun are those found below the photosphere or apparent surface. Describe each of these regions including relative location, size, temperature, and energy creation or transport as applicable.

Worth 20 points

Homework 5

This assignment can be found in the Content area of the course. You will answer five to ten questions relating to Chapters 9 & 10. Your answers are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of the concept involved in your own words, and not be simply a series of quotes from the reference sources. Refer to the assignment expectations for additional guidelines. This assignment is worth 25 points.

Quiz 5

This quiz consists of five (5) to ten (10) multiple choice or true/false questions covering Chapters 9 & 10. There is a fifteen minute (15) time limit. Only one (1) attempt is allowed. Once the quiz is started, it must be completed. Scores will be immediately available upon submission. Worth 30 points.

Readings

Textbook, Chapters 11 & 12

Discussion 6

Select one of the discussion topics from the following options. Your topic should be addressed in sufficient detail to fully describe the properties of the concepts involved. The posting should be in your own words with minimal use of quotes. You must respond to at least three (3) other postings. To the extent possible based on the other class postings,  your responses must address a topic different from your original posting:

a)  Contrast the meaning of the terms luminosity, absolute magnitude, and apparent magnitude. Discuss why they are important in astronomy and how they are used.

b)  Describe the structure of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram including how it is developed, the significant regions, and the key value it provides astronomers as a tool.

c)  Review the evolutionary track of a typical 1 solar mass star on the H-R diagram from it proto-star stage until the end of its status as a star.  Address what occurs to cause its transition from one stage to the next.

d)  Cepheid Variable Stars are an extremely useful as tools for astronomers. Describe the characteristics of a Cepheid variable star, the cause of its behavior, and for what and how it is used by astronomers.

Worth 20 points

Homework 6

This assignment can be found in the Content area of the course. You will answer five to ten questions relating to Chapters 11 & 12. Your answers are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of the concept involved in your own words, and not be simply a series of quotes from the reference sources. Refer to the assignment expectations for additional guidelines. This assignment is worth 25 points.

Quiz 6

This quiz consists of five (5) to ten (10) multiple choice or true/false questions covering Chapters 11 & 12. There is a fifteen minute (15) time limit. Only one (1) attempt is allowed. Once the quiz is started, it must be completed. Scores will be immediately available upon submission. Worth 30 points.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Readings

Textbook, Chapters 13, 14, & 15

Discussion 7

Select one of the discussion topics from the following options. Your topic should be addressed in sufficient detail to fully describe the properties of the concepts involved. The posting should be in your own words with minimal use of quotes. You must respond to at least three (3) other postings. To the extent possible based on the other class postings,  your responses must address a topic different from your original posting:

a)  The last stage in the evolutionary track of a star depends upon the star’s mass. Discuss the various possible ending stage of stars and relate the cause of the outcome of each to their mass.

b)  Stars can exist as, or evolve into, entities that sometimes seem rather exotic like neutron stars and pulsars. Describe the characteristics of each of these objects including their basic properties, how they form, and how they evolve.

c)  One of the more bizarre objects in the universe is the Black Hole. Describe in depth their fundamental properties, how they come to be, and how we know they exist.

d)  The overall structure of our own Milky Way galaxy is hard to determine because we are inside of it with major portions being obscured by interstellar gases, dust, and other debris. Explain the methods used to map our galaxy both now and in the past, along with their outcomes. Present our current understanding of the structure of our galaxy and where we are located in it.

Worth 20 points

Homework 7

This assignment can be found in the Content area of the course. You will answer five to ten questions relating to Chapters 13, 14, & 15. Your answers are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of the concept involved in your own words, and not be simply a series of quotes from the reference sources. Refer to the assignment expectations for additional guidelines. This assignment is worth 25 points.

Quiz 7

This quiz consists of five (5) to ten (10) multiple choice or true/false questions covering Chapters 13, 14, & 15. There is a fifteen minute (15) time limit. Only one (1) attempt is allowed. Once the quiz is started, it must be completed. Scores will be immediately available upon submission. Worth 30 points.

Readings

Textbook, Chapters 16, 18, & 19

Discussion 8

Select one of the discussion topics from the following options. Your topic should be addressed in sufficient detail to fully describe the properties of the concepts involved. The posting should be in your own words with minimal use of quotes. You must respond to at least three (3) other postings. To the extent possible based on the other class postings,  your responses must address a topic different from your original posting:

a)  The organizational structure above the level of the solar system is the galaxy. Galaxies exist in several forms. Describe the structure of the five common galaxy types and the factors that contributed to their formation.

b)  Galaxies do not represent the highest level of organizational structure. Galaxies themselves can be part of an even larger entities. Discuss these larger structures, giving examples. You might also address how the currently not fully understood concepts of dark matter and dark energy affect these groupings.

c)  Hubble’s Law is profound in that it provides a tool for measuring distances out to the very edge of the known universe and applied in reverse suggests the basic formation theory for the universe itself- the Big Bang. Explain the concept of Hubble’s Law and how it allows the determination of such great distances as well as how it supports the concept of the Big Bang.

d)  The most profound unanswered question that mankind can ask is “Are we alone in the universe”?  Is our little blue planet the only place where conditions have been right to support the formation of the many levels of life we see here on Earth? Describe the steps that have been taken to discover this extra-terrestrial life including why the current lack of success to date is to be expected and does not support the conclusion that there is no other life out there.

Homework 8

This assignment can be found in the Content area of the course. You will answer five to ten questions relating to Chapters 16, 18, & 19. Your answers are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of the concept involved in your own words, and not be simply a series of quotes from the reference sources. Refer to the assignment expectations for additional guidelines. This assignment is worth 25 points.

Final Exam

This is a proctored exam. The proctor must be approved by the class instructor. You must submit your Proctor Request form to the appropriate Dropbox in the course by the end of Week 2. Please see the Content area of the course for more information.

The final exam covers materials from Weeks 5-8. The questions are a variety of short answer, multiple choice, and true/false. No mathematical calculations will be required. There is a 60 minute time limit. The exam will be available from Tuesday at 12:01 AM CT until Saturday at 11:59 PM CT of Week 8. The submission view of the test will be available after the exam closes. This view will reflect questions answered incorrectly along with the correct answers for those questions. Worth 215 points.

  Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a cumulative process that begins with the first college learning opportunity. Students are responsible for knowing the Academic Integrity policy and procedures and may not use ignorance of either as an excuse for academic misconduct. Columbia College recognizes that the vast majority of students at Columbia College maintain high ethical academic standards; however, failure to abide by the prohibitions listed herein is considered academic misconduct and may result in disciplinary action, a failing grade on the assignment, and/or a grade of "F" for the course.

Additionally, all required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Columbia College is committed to creating a learning environment that meets the needs of its diverse student body. If you anticipate or experience any barriers to learning, communicate your concerns with the instructor. In addition to speaking with the instructor, the following resources are available to ensure an opportunity to learn in an inclusive environment that values mutual respect.

  • For students with disabilities/conditions who are experiencing barriers to learning or assessment, contact the Student Accessibility Resources office at (573) 875-7626 or sar@ccis.edu to discuss a range of options to removing barriers in the course, including accommodations.
  • For students who are experiencing conflict which is impacting their educational environment, contact the Office of Student Conduct at studentconduct@ccis.edu or (573) 875-7877.
  • For students who have concerns related to discrimination or harassment based on sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy or parental status, please contact the Title IX Office at titleixcoordinator@ccis.edu. More information can be found at http://www.ccis.edu/policies/notice-of-non-discrimination-and-equal-opportunity.aspx

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No credit will be given for late discussion posts, either the original response or the class interactions with the exception of clarifications to the instructor's questions as outlined in the Discussion Overview section. Late Homework assignments may be submitted for up to three days after the assignmnet due date. However, a late submission penalty of 5% per day may be imposed.

Quizzes and Exams must be taken by 11:59 PM CT on the due date. No late credit will be given unless the student has requested and received permission to submit the test late prior to the due date of the quiz. Late submission of the final exam is not allowed. Should circumstances arise where the student cannot take the final exam in the allotted time period, the student must take a zero on the exam or request and receive approval from the instructor to take an "incomplete" grade until the final exam is taken.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.

  Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. If you have technical problems with the VitalSource eText reader, please contact VitalSource. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.