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Online classes

Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2017/2018

AMSL 102: American Sign Language II

Course Description

This course is designed to expand more on ASL grammar, vocabulary, and language structure.   Students are engaged in active language production using authentic conversations within the classroom environment.

Prerequisite: AMSL 101 with a grade of C or higher

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Smith, Cheri, Ella Mae Lentz, and Ken Mikos. Signing Naturally: Student Workbook, Units 1-6. 8th ed. San Diego: Dawn Sign Press, 2008.
    • ISBN-978-1-58121-210-5

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

This course is the second in a series of five courses.  This is the entry level course designed to introduce students to basic vocabulary, sign production, non-manual markers and language structure. This course is taught in American Sign Language.

Students will learn ASL vocabulary, cardinal numbers, ordinal numbers, fingerspelling, conversational signs, descriptions, giving basic directions, commands, time signs, describing shapes, language backgrounds, narratives, biography of deaf individuals, and cultural notes. After completing both AMSL 101 and 102 you should be able to hold basic conversations with deaf people.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

To complete assignments specific to this course participants will also need:
  • a video camera or web cam,
  • YouTube account (Note: each student has a YouTube account that comes along with their CougarMail account)
  • It is highly recommended that students use broadband internet access for this course, as video is the main medium of course delivery and assignment submission.

Course Objectives

  • To understand components of American Sign Language with increased attention to correct grammatical structure
  • To increase awareness of American Deaf culture.
  • To understand American Sign Language in a more complex manner
  • To understand receptively and expressively ASL vocabulary, numbers and fingerspelling at advanced levels
  • To understand non manual markers while signing conversations at advanced levels
  • To understand advanced conversational/cultural behaviors using ASL

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate use of American Sign Language in a variety of interactive situations
  • Demonstrate ASL vocabulary, numbers, and fingerspelling during interactive situations
  • Demonstrate use of appropriate grammatical structure and non-manual markers while signing more advanced conversations
  • Identify and describe specific elements of Deaf cultur
  • Demonstrate use of American Sign Language receptively and expressively
  • Demonstrate advanced conversational/cultural behaviors while using American Sign Language

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions 185 18%
Practice Exercises 50 5%
Assessment Quizzes 125 12%
Video Submissions 100 10%
Performance Video Exams 200 20%
Self and Peer Assessments of Performance Video Exams 100 10%
Storytelling Transcription 40 4%
Final Exam 200 20%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Practice Exercises 10 Wednesday
Discussion 1 10 Sunday
Video Submission 1 20
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Practice Exercises 10 Wednesday
Discussion 2 10 Sunday
Assessment Quiz 25
Video Submission 2 20
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Practice Exercises 10 Wednesday
Discussion 3 10 Sunday
Assessment Quiz 25
Video Submission 3 20
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Practice Exercises 10 Wednesday
Discussion 4 10 Sunday
Assessment Quiz 25
Performance Video Exam 1 100
Self-Assessment for Performance Video Exam 1 50
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Practice Exercises 10 Wednesday
Discussion 5 10 Sunday
Assessment Quiz 25
Video Submission 4 20
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6 45 Thursday
Assessment Quiz 25 Sunday
Performance Video Exam 2 100
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Peer Assessment of Performance Video Exam 2 50 Wednesday
Discussion 7 45 Thursday
Video Submission 5 20 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 45 Thursday
Storytelling Transcription 40 Saturday
Final Exam 200
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Book and DVD Assignments

The purpose of the Book & DVD assignments is for you to get the core vocabulary and grammar exposure; these will provide you with the main content of the class. Additionally, due to the unique nature of this course it is imperative that you have a copy of the book for the first day of class.

You should complete all activities within the book and watch the DVD clips assigned for the week before completing your weekly work. All assignments rely heavily on this information. Please note that there are significant weekly learning and study aids available through the text. Spend time reviewing these learning resources so you can maximize your learning experience.


Instructor Videos

The purpose of the instructor videos is to expand on what you are learning in your Book & DVD. Each week in the Content area of the course there are videos of your instructor demonstrating how to properly sign specific words or phrases. These videos are required and like the Book and DVD, are not scored. It is strongly suggested you view the videos weekly before submitting your Performance Video Exams or Weekly Video Submissions. However, the instructor videos *do not* contain all the signs you are to learn, so be sure to also work through your Book and DVD and do not rely solely on the instructor videos.

Discussions

Discussions in this course are divided into two segments. For the first five weeks, we will continue to expand our knowledge of Deaf culture. Language should always be learned in the context of the culture in which it is used, and the same goes for American Sign Language. Weeks 1 through 5 there will be discussion prompts related to Deaf culture. You will be expected to post an initial post by Wednesday and at least 2 substantive replies to your peers within that discussion by the reply due date.

For the last three weeks of the course, we will focus on storytelling.
  • Discussion 6-7 will require you to perform and record an assigned story, complete a self-evaluation of that story and two peer-evaluations. The story you will perform will be assigned by the instructor prior to the week. You will also be assigned two other students to peer evaluate.
  • Discussion 8 will require you to tell your own childhood story. This video should be a short story, no longer than 2-3 minutes in length. You will post your video to the discussions area for others to view. You will complete a self-evaluation of the video and complete two peer evaluations. Your instructor will assign classmates for the peer evaluation.

Video Submissions

The purpose of the weekly video submissions is twofold: (1) to provide you with an opportunity to demonstrate your expressive ASL skills, and (2) for me to provide you with feedback on those skills. It’s something you should look forward to doing! These are not tests or quizzes, but opportunities for feedback that will help you in your performance assessments and overall expressive language skills. My feedback to you will be text and/or signed, and may include links to videos for you to watch if there are errors in your signing.

You will complete five Weekly Video Submissions. These are student-created videos (self-made recordings) that demonstrate your ASL skills. Directions for the Weekly Video Submission are located in the Content area of the course under the appropriate week. Students are advised to complete the Book & DVD assignments as well as watch the “Instructor Videos” for the week before completing the video submissions.

Submitting videos:
Videos must be submitted using YouTube; as a student of Columbia College you all have a YouTube account associated with your CougarMail account. You may submit your video as “unlisted”. You are urged to refer to the “Video checklist” before submitting the assignment to make sure your video permissions are set correctly and your video is good quality.

The following reasons will earn you automatic points off of your video score and no instructor feedback:
  • If your video is set to PRIVATE (-10 points, I won’t be able to see it at all, after the setting change, no feedback given)
  • If there is more than one video to complete the assignment (-10 points, only one video will be watched)
  • If the video is not of good quality ( -10 points if I cannot see your signs)
  • If you forget to send the link or for any other reason I can’t view your video, it will be considered late.

Assessment Quizzes

The purpose of the assessment quizzes is to allow me to assess your receptive skills (how well you understand elements of ASL).

Quizzes are available for completion from Monday to Sunday of each week and must be completed no later than Sunday at 11:59PM (Central Time).  Quizzes are videos conducted in sign language.  You will watch the video and choose the answer you think is correct. You are quizzed on what you have learned in the previous week(s). There is one quiz required each week. You only have one timed attempt. You are not to use your book as a reference. You are to do these on your own without assistance.


Practice Exercises

The purpose of the practice exercises is, like the instructor videos and exercises, to expand on what you are learning in your Book and DVD and give you an opportunity to practice and learn until you achieve mastery of understanding what is signed. These should be fun! These exercises are due the Wednesday of each week unless otherwise noted. These are found in the Quizzes section. You are given unlimited attempts, so the focus of these exercises is on learning rather than testing. Your highest score will be the one recorded. However, late submissions or attempts will not be accepted, so start practicing early!

Performance Video Exams

The purpose of the performance video exams is to allow me to assess your expressive ASL skills (how well you can produce ASL).

You will complete two Performance Video Exams during the session (Week 4 and Week 6). These are videos of yourself that demonstrate the ASL skills you have learned. Detailed information used to complete each video is located in the Content area of the course. Videos must be submitted using YouTube. You are advised to complete your Book and DVD as well as watch the instructor videos prior to completing your exam. You are urged to refer to the “Video checklist” before submitting the assignment to make sure your video permissions are set correctly and your video is good quality.

The following reasons will earn you automatic points off of your video score and no instructor feedback:
  • If your video is set to PRIVATE (-10 points, I won’t be able to see it at all, after the setting change, no feedback given)
  • If there is more than one video to complete the assignment (-10 points, only one video will be watched)
  • If the video is not of good quality ( -10 points if I cannot see your signs)
  • If you forget to send the link or for any other reason I can’t view your video it will be considered late.

Self-Assessment of Performance Video Exams

The purpose of the self-assessment of the performance video exams is to allow you to reflect on your video and expressive ASL skills. You are not expected to sign everything perfectly; but even the best signers are able to watch, reflect, and analyze how they can sign it better next time.

You will complete a detailed self-analysis on both of your Performance Video Exams. Using the rubric provided in the Content area, you will complete a self-assessment based on the four categories within the rubric. You must provide two examples in each section from your video to justify the score given out of 100 points.


Peer Assessment of Performance Video Exams

You will complete a detailed peer-analysis on Performance Video 2 (Unit 5). You will be assigned a classmate to review by the instructor. Using the rubric provided in the Content area, you will complete a peer-assessment based on the four categories within the rubric. You must provide examples from your video to justify the score given out of 100 points.

Storytelling Transcription

In the Content area, you will find storytelling videos. You will select two of them and transcribe in English what was signed. Your transcription should be written using complete sentences and punctuation.

Final Exam

The purpose of the Final Exam is for me to assess your comprehensive receptive knowledge of ASL that you have learned in this class.The Final Exam is divided into four parts.The exam is video intensive! Please ensure you have a good internet connection before beginning each portion of the exam.

The Final Exam must be completed by Saturday at 11:59PM Central Time of Week 8. The Final Exam will be a comprehensive exam of what you have learned during the session. The exam will consist of videos, much like the quizzes. You will watch the video and select the correct answer (or type the answer, when appropriate.)



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Units 4:1-4:6, Introducing Yourself
Readings and Videos
Units 4:1-4:6.  Also watch the instructor videos in the Content area.
Practice Exercises
Complete all practice exercises for the week.
Discussion 1

Read the “Did You Realize?” segments in your textbook on pages 183, 248, and 275, then choose one of the prompts below to respond to in your initial post.  Then respond to at least two classmates who posted on a different segment than the one you selected.

  • Prompt 1 (pg. 183): The innovation of sound was a great advance in movie technology, at least for the hearing community.Discuss how this advancement was a loss for the Deaf community.Can you think of any other technological innovations that either affect the Deaf community negatively, don’t pertain to them at all, or possibly had a more positive effect on them than the hearing community?
  • Prompt 2 (pg. 248): What are some other examples of hand signs and signals that are used in an organized manner outside of sign language?
  • Prompt 3 (pg. 275): What are some advantages and disadvantages to having a completely Deaf community?

Video Submission 1
Submit to Dropbox. Directions for the Weekly Video Submission are located in the Content area under Week 1.
Week 2: Units 4:7-4:11
Readings and Videos
Units 4:7-4:11.  Also watch the instructor videos in the Content area.
Practice Exercises
Complete all practice exercises for the week.
Discussion 2

Read the Deaf Profile on page 186 in your textbook on Marie Jean Philip then respond to the discussion prompt.

One of the most amazing things that Marie Jean Philip did was go to college in a completely hearing community after being raised and educated in a Deaf world.  This would be about the same as you enrolling at Gallaudet and trying to fit in and communicate.  This about how well you think you would do in that situation and how it might make you feel, then compare your reaction to how Marie Jean Philip responded to her experiences.

Assessment Quiz
Complete in the Quizzes area over units 4:1-4:6.
Video Submission 2
Submit to Dropbox. Directions for the Weekly Video Submission are located in the Content area under Week 2.
Week 3: Unit 4:12 - Unit 4 Review
Readings and Videos
Units 4:12-Unit 4 Review.  Also watch the instructor videos in the Content area.
Practice Exercises
Complete all practice exercises for the week.
Discussion 3

Watch “My Family by Iva” on your DVD then respond to the discussion prompt.

How did she feel about her baby being hearing and why do you think she felt this way?  Also, how would you have felt if the situation were reversed (you being hearing and your child being Deaf)?

Assessment Quiz
Complete in the Quizzes area over units 4:7-4:11.
Video Submission 3
Replace this text with your 'Section' text.
Week 4: Units 5:1-5:4
Readings and Videos
Units 5:1-5:4.  Also watch the instructor videos in the Content area.
Practice Exercises
Complete all practice exercises for the week.
Discussion 4
Read the Key Grammar segments on page 199 and 232 in your textbook, then choose one of the prompts below to respond to in your initial post.  Then respond to at least two classmates who posted on a different segment than the one you selected.
  • Prompt 1 (pg. 199): Why do you think that ASL does not make a distinction of gender in possessive adjectives (her, him, etc.)?
  • Prompt 2 (pg. 232): Asking a question in sign language is very different from asking a question in English.Discuss how they are different and why you think those differences exist.
Assessment Quiz
Complete in the Quizzes area over units 4:12-Unit 4 Review.
Performance Video Exam 1
Submit to Dropbox. Directions are located in the Content area under Week 4. Performance Video Exam 1 will consist of material covered in Unit 4.
Self-Assessment for Performance Video Exam 1
Submit your assessment to the Dropbox. Additional information on how to complete this assignment is located in the Content area. 
Week 5: Unit 5:5 -Unit 5 Review
Readings and Videos
Units 5:5 -Unit 5 Review.  Also watch the instructor videos in the Content area.
Practice Exercises
Complete all practice exercises for the week.
Discussion 5

Watch the film “Technology and Deaf Culture” (Stafford Library link provided in the Content Area), then respond to the discussion prompt.

What is your opinion on cochlear implants?  Should they be considered as a cure to a disability or should they be looked upon as an offensive way of telling someone they are broken?  There are strong opinions on either side but what do you agree with?

Assessment Quiz
Complete in the Quizzes area over units 5:1-5:4.
Video Submission 4
Replace this text with your 'Section' text.
Week 6: Units 6:1-6:8 and Storytelling
Readings and Videos
Units 6:1-6:8.  Also watch the instructor videos in the Content area.
Discussion 6
You will be assigned a story; you will videotape yourself signing the story and submit it to the Discussions area. You will need to evaluate your own story as well as two of your classmate’s stories (these will also be assigned by the instructor). Evaluation forms are located in the Content area. Stories to be assigned: Timber Story, The Gum Story, The Gaullaudet and Clerc Story 
Assessment Quiz
Complete in the Quizzes area over units 5:5-unit 5 Review.
Performance Video Exam 2
Submit to Dropbox. Directions are located in the Content area under Week 5. Performance Video Exam 2 will consist of material covered in Unit 5.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Units 6:9-6:17 and Storytelling
Readings and Videos
Units 6:9-6:17.  Also watch the instructor videos in the Content area.
Peer Assessment of Performance Video Exam 2
Submit your assessment to the Dropbox. Additional information on how to complete this assignment is located in the Content area. 
Discussion 7
You will be assigned a story; you will videotape yourself signing the story and submit it to the Discussions area. You will need to evaluate your own story as well as two of your classmate’s stories (these will also be assigned by the instructor).  Evaluation forms are located in the Content area. Use the evaluation forms from week 6 and adapt to the story. Stories: Wrong Name, If Only I could Fly, A True Fish Story, I Wanna Be Different.
Video Submission 5
Submit to Dropbox. Directions for the Weekly Video Submission are located in the Content area under Week 7.
Week 8: Unit 6 Review and Course Wrap up
Readings and Videos
Review Unit 6.  Also watch the instructor videos in the Content area.
Discussion 8
You will videotape yourself telling your own childhood story. This video should be a short story, no longer than 2-3 minutes. You will need to evaluate your own story as well as two of your classmate’s stories (these will be assigned by the instructor). Evaluation forms are located in the Content area. 
Storytelling Transcription
After watching the stories located in the Content area, select two and provide transcription of what was signed. Submit the transcription for your two selected stories to the Dropbox.
Final Exam
Comprehensive receptive exam of all information presented in the course.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

No late video submissions accepted. If you submit your video and I am unable to access your video for any reason, it will be considered late.

To be fair and equitable to the group you need to turn your work in on time.  Time management is an essential part of the college experience.   If there are extreme unforeseen circumstances please contact me prior to the due date.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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