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Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

AFCS 102: Culture And Society Of Africa II

Course Description

This course continues a survey of the social, cultural, literary, and political history of Africa.  The course is designed to be taken in sequence with African Culture and Society I as an intensive study of the African culture and its people.  Taking AFCS 101 before AFCS 102 will greatly enhance your overall experience in this course.  Course meets multicultural graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: None

Proctored Exams: Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Nugent, Paul. Africa since Independence: A Comparative History. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
    • ISBN-978-0-230-27288-0

Recommended

  • Thomson, Alex. An Introduction to African Politics. 3rd. Routledge, 2010.
    • ISBN-978-0-415-48287-5
      • Note: While this text from AFCS 101 is not a required reading, its strongly suggested you keep it handy as an aid for understanding some of the terminology in Nugent's book.

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Now that you are familiar with many of the basic concepts in the field, it’s time to get specific and apply them to extensive case studies of several nations in Sub-Saharan Africa. This course greatly expands on the framework provided in the AFCS 101 by going into depth concerning major themes in Modern African politics, economics and culture. In particular, students will be asked to think in a comparative perspective on the various routes towards development individual African nations have taken since independence and the range of results they produced.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To develop an understanding of, and appreciation for, the daily life of the culture.
  • To explore the development of cultural identity for the people.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the social, literary, political, and economic forces that create a culture.
  • Examine the birth, growth, and changes of a culture.
  • Participate in an intense study of daily life, politics, science, philosophy, religion, architecture, art, music, dance, etc.
  • Develop a critical understanding for what it means to have this cultural identity in relationship to other cultures.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (8) 200 20%
Quizzes (8) 300 30%
Research Paper (1) 200 20%
Final Exam (1) 300 30%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 25 Sunday
Quiz 1 40
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 25 Sunday
Quiz 2 40
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 25 Sunday
Quiz 3 40
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 25 Sunday
Quiz 4 40
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 25 Sunday
Quiz 5 40
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6 25 Sunday
Quiz 6 40
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 25 Sunday
Quiz 7 40
Research Paper: Final Submission 200
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 25 Saturday
Quiz 8 20
Final Exam 300
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Participation in all assigned discussion topics will improve performance on exams and may be considered holistically by the professor. The discussion each week has three parts:

  • Essential Question(s): Question prompts that address topics from reading assignments.
  • Online Learning Center: Question prompts that address topic from supplemental multimedia added to the weekly modules of the course.
  • Deep Thought: A reflection/response to the readings for the week.

For both the Essential Question and Online Learning Center discussion formats, you must first post an answer to the questions asked and then respond to at least one of your classmates’ posting in each of the three discussion parts. The Deep Thought format will require that one student post a deep thought to the Discussion topic with the remainder of the class responding to their thought as well as at least one other student.

This means each week you will have at least 6 postings with 2 postings in each discussion (core posts are worth 19 points/replies to classmates are 2 points each). Discussions are informal; however, you are still expected to communicate effectively and ensure that your posting is intelligible as well as original.


Quizzes

Each week you will complete a non-proctored multiple-choice quiz over the week’s reading material. Quizzes 1-7 will consist of 20 questions worth 2 points each, and you will have 35 minutes to complete each quiz. Quiz 8 will consists of one essay question that will be on the Final Exam as well. You will have one attempt and 25 minutes to complete it, so be sure to complete the readings first. While the quizzes are open book, you will not have the time to look up all of the answers. All quizzes may be found in the Quizzes area of D2L.

Research Paper

Scholarship provides you with the opportunity to develop research and writing skills as well as to synthesize knowledge about an important subject. Moreover, scholars of history not only discuss the matters of fact but also tell their stories with skill. This paper requires you, first, to critically analyze primary sources and, second, to research related secondary sources.

You will begin work on the Research Paper in Week 3, where you will choose and submit a topic to both the Dropbox and assigned Discussion topic for consideration. Additionally, submit to the appropriate discussion topic for further feedback from your class.

Your paper should include the following components:

  • Thoughtful consideration of a controversial issue that elaborates major points with specificity and clarifies premises using coherent diction.
     
  • Identification of at least four (4) examples of primary sources (i.e., letters, diaries, publications) related to the issue
  • Identification and use of additional secondary sources that contribute to the thesis.
  • A thesis statement that clearly and concisely states the paper’s purpose.
  • Demonstration of thoughtful and logical organization of ideas through a well-developed introduction, body, and conclusion.

Submission Requirements

Your Research Paper should be superior work, edited carefully for grammar and style and clear of awkward language, improper grammar or flawed punctuation. It should be roughly 4-6 pages in length (without title page/bibliography), double-spaced with 1” margins and 25-27 lines of type in a 12 point font. It should be submitted as one assignment saved in MS Word or another approved file format. It should utilize MLA/APA or Chicago style, used correctly and consistently across the document.

If your paper references a source other than the text, it should be cited correctly in a bibliography that lists primary and secondary sources separately according to the documentation style chosen. The use of any secondary reference without providing citation will be considered plagiarism.

Punctuality is vital in order to receive final credit. Pay close attention to the class schedule for deadlines regarding drafts and requested revisions.

The final Research Paper must be submitted by 11:59 pm CT of Week 7.

A Note about the Texts: The main textbooks for this course, An Introduction to African Politics by Alex Thomson and The African Genius by Basil Davidson are considered Secondary Sources, which means that the author (or historian) has written his version of history based on interpretations of historical documents or primary sources. Primary Sources are documents that are used by historians to write about past events. These are such things as diaries, journals, letters, etc. that were written at the time the historian is studying.


Final Exam

The Final Exam will be proctored, administered by a supervisor approved by the instructor (see Proctored Policy for more information). You must arrange an acceptable proctor. Proctor information must be submitted to the appropriate dropbox by 11:59 pm CT Sunday of Week 2.

The Final Exam will consist of fifty (50) multiple choice questions earning 4 points per answer and two (2) essay questions earning 50 points per answer. The testing period will be open from 12:01 am CT Monday until 11:59 pm CT Saturday of Week 8. You will have two hours to complete the exam. The exam is comprehensive. A study guide that will help you prepare for the exam will be made available in the Content area.


Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Introduction and a Review of the Colonial Legacy
Readings
Nugent: “Introduction: The Basis of Comparison” and “African Independence: Poisoned Chalice or Cup of Plenty”
Discussion 1
• Introduction: Introduce yourself to our online community by writing a brief autobiography for your classmates. Include details such as your hobbies, occupation, and interests as well as some idea of what you would like to learn from this course.
• Essential Question: Using Nugent’s text, identify several outcomes experienced by African countries emerging from the Colonial era. Why are these outcomes important for us to consider? Additionally, identify key characteristics and differences between these outcomes and post your initial responses and at least one response to another classmate in the discussion thread.
• Online Learning Center: Watch Parts I and II of CIA & Angolan Revolution 1975, a documentary about Angola's movement for independence and subsequent civil war. Then, in the discussion thread, answer the following: In what ways did the international politics of the Cold War undermine Angola's young independence movement? What were the results of international interference there? In addition to your initial post, please respond to at least one other classmate’s answer.
• Deep Thought: One student will pose a Deep Thought in the discussion based on the assigned readings for the week. Everyone will then post a response (with exception of the person who made the first post) to the Deep Thought and then respond to at least one other student’s answer (all students).
Quiz 1
Complete this week’s quiz, located in the Quizzes area.
Week 2: Working with the Unworkable: Africa’s Political Geography
Readings
Nugent: “A Profile of Africa at Independence”
Discussion 2
• Essential Question: Why is political geography important for African nations? How do borders, climate, proximity to water, population growth, access to raw materials etc. forecast how each country might develop differently from another? Please cite examples to support your answers. Post your initial response to this prompt, and at least one response to another classmate in the discussion thread.
• Online Learning Center: Watch Riz Khan-Nigeria’s Oil-22 July 08, Part 1, a video that highlights the pitfalls of oil production in Nigeria. Then, in the discussions thread, answer the following: In what ways has oil been problematic for Nigeria and why? Who is responsible for the situation in the Niger Delta? In addition to your initial post, please respond to at least one other classmate’s answer.
• Deep Thought: One student will pose a Deep Thought in the discussion based on the assigned readings for the week. Everyone will then post a response (with exception of the person who made the first post) to the Deep Thought and then a response to at least one other student’s answer (all students).
Quiz 2
Complete this week’s quiz, located in the Quizzes area.
Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Balkanization or Unity
Readings
Nugent: “The Shape of Things to Come: Irredentism, Secessionism and the Pan-African Ideal”
Discussion 3
• Essential Question: Identify instances where inherited borders from the Colonial Era led to conflict and secessionist movements. Is Pan-Africanism a realistic alternative to the arbitrary borders left by Europeans? Post your initial response to this prompt, and at least one response to another classmate in the appropriate discussion thread.
• Online Learning Center: The African Union is an inter-governmental organization that attempts to foster African cooperation on various economic, social and security issues on the continent. Watch Press TV-Africa Today-The African Union-02-02-2010 in the Content area, which is a debate between two African intellectuals. Then, in the Discussions area, answer the following: What are some of the challenges an organization like the African Union faces? Is it a worthwhile project? In addition to your initial post, please respond to at least one other classmate’s answer.
• Deep Thought: One student will pose a Deep Thought in the discussion based on the assigned readings for the week. Everyone will then post a response (with exception of the person who made the first post) to the
Quiz 3
Complete this week’s quiz, located in the Quizzes area.
Research Paper: Topic Submission
Please submit your proposed Research Paper topic to the dropbox for feedback and approval. Additionally, submit to the appropriate discussion topic for further feedback from your class.
Week 4: Tradition in the Face of Rapid Change
Readings
Nugent: “Modernity and Tradition, Power and Prestige: Monarchs, Chiefs and Politicians”
Discussion 4
• Essential Question: Are “traditional” chiefs necessary in modern Africa: why or why not? In your view, are “traditional” chiefs and necessary in a modern Africa governed by Presidents: why or why not? Post your initial response to this prompt, and at least one response to another classmate in the discussion thread.
• Online Learning Center: Despite Ghana's status as a multi-ethnic and democratic Presidential Republic, the position of chiefs and traditional rulers in society is still important at times. Watch the news story about the King of the Ashanti people in Ghana in the Content area. Then, for this week’s discussion, answer the following: What role does the Ashanti king play in modern Ghana? Do traditional rulers have a place in modern Africa? In addition to your initial post, please respond to at least one other classmate’s answer.
• Deep Thought: One student will pose a Deep Thought in the discussion based on the assigned readings for the week. Everyone will then post a response (with exception of the person who made the first post) to the Deep Thought and then a response to at least one other student’s answer (all students).
Quiz 4
Complete this week’s quiz, located in the Quizzes area.
Week 5: An Evaluation of Capitalism and Socialism in Africa
Readings
Nugent: “‘Ism Schisms’: African Socialism and Home-Grown Capitalism, 1960-85”
Discussion 5
• Essential Question: What were some successes and failures of both Capitalist and Socialist regimes in Africa from 1960-1985? Post your initial response to this prompt, and at least one response to another classmate in the discussion thread.
• Online Learning Center: Watch Parts I and II of The Legacy of Julius Nyerere, a documentary about Tanzanian President Julius Nyerere in the Content area. Then, for this week’s discussion, answer the following: If you were an African leader after independence, would you have been African Socialist like Julius Nyerere and Kwame Nkrumah, or a State Capitalist like Jomo Kenyatta and Felix Houphouet Boigny? Explain your choice as part of your answer? In addition to your initial post, please respond to at least one other classmate’s answer.
• Deep Thought: One student will pose a Deep Thought in the discussion based on the assigned readings for the week. Everyone will then post a response (with exception of the person who made the first post) to the Deep Thought and then a response to at least one other student’s answer (all students).
Quiz 5
Complete this week’s quiz, located in the Quizzes area.
Week 6: Case Studies of Military Rule
Readings
Nugent: “Khaki Fatigue: Military Rule in Africa, 1960-85”
Discussion 6
• Essential Question: Identify prominent examples of military rule across Africa. Were the outcomes of these movements largely positive or negative? Post your initial response to this prompt, and at least one response to another classmate in the discussion thread.
• Online Learning Center: Since the era of independence, Africa has produced a large number of internationally acclaimed authors of both literature and academic studies. Perhaps the most famous is Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe. Watch Parts I, II and III of Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe on CNN’s ‘African Voices’ in the Content area. Then, in the discussions area, answer the following: What role can/do intellectuals play in modern African life and culture? In addition to your initial post, please respond to at least one other classmate’s answer.
• Deep Thoughts: One student will pose a Deep Thought in the discussion based on the assigned readings for the week. Everyone will then post a response (with exception of the person who made the first post) to the Deep Thought and then a response to at least one other student’s answer (all students).
Quiz 6
Complete this week’s quiz, located in the Quizzes area.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Africa and the World Since 1980
Readings
Nugent: “Second Liberation: Guerrilla Warfare, Township Revolt and the Search for a New Social Order” and “Invasion of the Acronyms: SAPs, AIDS and the NGO Takeover”
Discussion 7
• Essential Question: Using Nugent’s text, identify the following: In what ways have International Financial Institutions and HIV/AIDS and Non-Governmental Organizations changed Africa? Post your initial response to this prompt, and at least one response to another classmate in the discussion thread.
• Online Learning Center: The HIV/AIDs epidemic across Africa has received a great deal of attention by the international press and NGO groups. What is not widely known is that relatively cheap anti-viral drugs have proven to be effective at preventing the spread of the disease, and prolonging the lives infected people. Watch The Lazarus Effect in the Content area. Then, in the discussion for this week answer the following: What role should Western Countries and NGOs play in the fight against HIV/AIDS in Africa? Please explain your rationale in expanding or limiting their role(s). In addition to your initial post, please respond to at least one other classmate’s answer.
• Deep Thought: One student will pose a Deep Thought in the discussion based on the assigned readings for the week. Everyone will then post a response (with exception of the person who made the first post) to the Deep Thought and then a response to at least one other student’s answer (all students).
Quiz 7
Complete this week’s quiz, located in the Quizzes area.
Research Paper: Final Submission
Review the assignment expectations and guidelines in the Content area. Please submit your Research Paper to the appropriate the dropbox by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.
Week 8: The Challenges of Democracy in Africa
Readings
Nugent: “Democracy Rediscovered: Popular Protest Elite Mobilization and the Return of Multipartyism” and “Millennial Africa: The National Question Revisited”
Discussion 8
• Essential Question: Using Nugent’s text, identify some of the ways African countries became democracies. What were some of the central challenges they faced? Post your initial response to this prompt, and at least one response to another classmate in the discussion thread.
• Online Learning Center: The improvement of governance in many African countries has led to increased investment/high rates of economic growth in recent years. As a result, there has been substantial growth in middle-class communities across the continent. Watch Middle Class Sprawls in Nairobi, Kenya, a news story about the growth of the middle class in Kenya in the Content area. Then, in the discussion this week, answer the following: What role does the middle-class play in modern Africa? Which people are best positioned to take advantage of Africa's growth? Please explain your rationale in expanding or limiting their role(s). In addition to your initial post, please respond to at least one other classmate’s answer.
• Deep Thought: One student will pose a Deep Thought in the discussion based on the assigned readings for the week. Everyone will then post a response (with exception of the person who made the first post) to the Deep Thought and then a response to at least one other student’s answer (all students).
Quiz 8
Complete this week’s quiz, located in the Quizzes area.
Final Exam
Your proctored final exam is to be completed this week. You have 2 hours to take the exam. The testing period will be open from 12:01 am CT Monday until 11:59 pm CT Saturday.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Research Papers submitted late will result in the paper’s grade being reduced by 15%. Late assignments will not be accepted if they are more than two weeks overdue. Non-submission of a given assignment will result in a grade of 0 (zero) for that requirement. Please DO NOT email them.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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