Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

ACCT 386: Managerial And Cost Accounting

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  Course Description

Accounting data and other financial data applied to the management of an enterprise. Cost accounting as a part of the spectrum of manufacturing costs is studied. Particular emphasis is placed on planning and controlling.

Prerequisite: ACCT 281

Proctored Exams: None



  Textbooks

As part of TruitionSM, students will receive their course materials automatically as described below.

Required

  •  Garrison, R. H., Noreen, E. & Brewer, P.C. (2017). Managerial Accounting with access to Connect (16th ed). New York: McGraw-Hill.  eText

Bookstore Information

Ed Map is Columbia College’s bookstore for Online, Nationwide, and Evening students.

eText Information

If a course uses an eText, (see Textbook information above) the book will be available directly in Desire2Learn (D2L) and through the VitalSource eText reader the Friday before the session begins, if registered for courses prior to that date.  Students will have a VitalSource account created for them using their CougarMail email address. Upon first login to VitalSource, students may need to verify their account and update their VitalSource password.  More information about how to use the VitalSource platform, including offline access to eTexts, can be found in D2L.  Students that would like to order an optional loose-leaf print-on-demand copy of eligible eTexts can do so through the Ed Map storefront at an additional cost.  Once orders are placed, it can take approximately five to seven business days for students to receive their print-on-demand books.

Physical Course Materials Information

Students enrolled in courses that require physical materials will receive these materials automatically at the address on file with Columbia College.  Delivery date of physical materials is dependent on registration date and shipping location.  Please refer to confirmation emails sent from Ed Map for more details on shipping status.

Returns: Students who drop a course with physical course materials will be responsible for returning those items to Ed Map within 30 days of receipt of the order.  More specific information on how to do so will be included in the package received from Ed Map.  See here for Ed Map's return policy. Failure to return physical items from a dropped course will result in a charge to the student account for all unreturned items.

Note: Students who opt-out of having their books provided as part of TruitionSM are responsible for purchasing their own course materials, but may do so through the Ed Map storefront. Visit https://www.ccis.edu/bookstore.aspx for details.

  Course Overview

This course will build upon your current knowledge of accounting and apply it to the management of an enterprise. Specifically, we will cover cost accounting as part of the spectrum of manufacturing costs. We will pay particular attention to planning and controlling. Topics include (but are not limited to) job order costing, process costing, variable costing, master budgets, flexible budgets and performance analysis, as well as capital budgeting decisions.

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Objectives

  • To become aware of the uses of accounting data within an organization by its managers.
  • To appreciate what kind of information is needed, where this information can be obtained, and how this information can be used by managers as they carry out their planning, control and decision-making responsibilities.

  Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Explain the accountant’s role in the organization and the decision making process.
  • Explain cost terms and describe cost behavior.
  • Explain job order and process costing systems.
  • Explain the concept of activity based costing systems.
  • Calculate and interpret cost-volume-profit relationships.
  • Explain profit planning analysis through the use of flexible budgeting and variance analysis.
  • Calculate pricing decisions based on relevant costs.
  • Prepare capital budgets.

  Grading

Grading Scale

Grade Points Percent
A 819-910 90-100%
B 728-818 80-89%
C 637-727 70-79%
D 546-636 60-69%
F 0-545 0-59%

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (8) 80 9%
Connect Homework (7) 280 31%
Biweekly Exams (3) 300 33%
Homework Review - Comprehensive (1) 100 11%
Final Exam (1) 150 16%
Total 910 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion -- Thursday
Discussion 1 10 Thursday/Sunday
Connect Homework 1 40 Sunday

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2: Group Case Study 10 Thursday/Sunday
Connect Homework 2 40 Sunday
Biweekly Exam 1 100

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 10 Thursday/Sunday
Connect Homework 3 40 Sunday

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4: Group Case Study 10 Thursday/Sunday
Connect Homework 4 40 Sunday
Biweekly Exam 2 100

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 10 Thursday/Sunday
Connect Homework 5 40 Sunday

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6: Group Case Study 10 Thursday/Sunday
Connect Homework 6 40 Sunday
Biweekly Exam 3 100

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 10 Thursday/Sunday
Connect Homework 7 40 Sunday

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 10 Thursday/Saturday
Homework Review (Comprehensive) 100 Thursday
Final Exam 150 Saturday
Total Points: 910

  Assignment Overview

Discussions

Individual Discussions:

All discussions must take place in the Discussions area, meaning that uploading an attachment as your post will not count.

Each week’s discussion will take place from Monday to Sunday, except for Week 8 which ends on Saturday. Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm Central Time (CT) on Thursday and two responses to classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday. During Week 8, both responses are due by 11:59 pm CT on Saturday.

You must post first before seeing your peers' posts. 

Your initial response to the discussion question should fully answer the question(s) asked. While I encourage you to write at least a paragraph, the content of your answer is more important that the length. Your initial posts and responses should be written in your own words, with your own thoughts and interpretations. Do not simply pull large quotes from other sources.  If you are writing about an assigned reading from our text, be sure to include the author and page number in the first sentence or two, so others know what piece you are referencing. If you do use an additional outside source, include in-text APA formatting for citations.

Your responses to others’ posts should also be well developed, fully explaining your response to the classmates’ posts. Make responses that add to the conversation and take it further; simply posting “I agree” or “good job” does not help develop ideas. For maximum learning and point benefits, respond to at least two students' posts.

Group Discussions:

In Weeks 2, 4, and 6, you will participate in small groups to discuss and solve a case study. You will be randomly assigned to a group for the remainder of the session. You are encouraged to come to a consensus on the case study questions. However, if there are points of disagreement, that is fine as well. In fact, I encourage you critically analyze each other’s answers.

You must post first before seeing your team's discussion. 

At the end of your discussion, one of your group members must summarize the final consensus (or lack thereof) to each case study question. This is to be completed within the D2L discussion you used to reach this consensus.

It is up to you and your group to determine who will be posting the short synopsis for each week. To ensure that the correct synopsis post is reviewed, please title this post with the heading “FINAL SYNOPSIS.” I suggest that each of you take a turn writing a synopsis (when possible) and commit this rotation to a schedule.

Your initial post is due by 11:59 pm Central Time (CT) on Thursday. These Group Discussions are designed to promote dialogue. Like your Individual Discussions, I should see at least two responses to your team's discussion by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

The final synopsis of this discussion is due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of each assigned week.

Grading Discussions:

Your initial post is worth 6 points, and your response posts are worth a combined 4 points.

Connect Homework

 You will have seven weekly homework assignments throughout this course. You will complete these assignments in CONNECT. These assignments will ask you to apply the information from the textbook and Instructional Materials. Homework assignments in Weeks 1 - 7 will be based on that week's material. These problems are calculation/application based problems. You will have three attempts per assignment.

(Please note that there is additional comprehensive homework assignment due in Week 8.)

The Homework Assignments will be available starting at 12:00 am CT on Monday of each week and are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of the week the Homework is assigned.

Each Connect Homework assignment is worth 40 points.

Biweekly Exams

You will take three biweekly exams in CONNECT during this course. These exams will ask you to complete 25 multiple-choice questions over the past two week’s readings. The amount of questions will depend on the complexity of each week's material.

Please note that these multiple-choice questions are computational.

Each exam opens at 12:01 am CT on Thursday of the week the exam is due. You will have 2 hours and one attempt to complete the exam.

You may use your book to help you find the answers, but your time is limited, so you must be very familiar with your textbook to find the answers quickly.

Each exam is worth 100 pts. and is due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of the appropriate week.

Immediately after submitting exam, you will see your score and questions answered incorrectly for 10 minutes.

Homework Review - Comprehensive

 During Week 8, your homework assignment will be a review of all the concepts throughout the course. This assignment will help you not only review for the Final Exam, but will also give you the opportunity to review the material taught in the course.

The Homework Review assignment will be available in CONNECT and will open at 12:01 am CT on Monday of Week 6 and is due by 11:59 pm CT on Thursday of Week 8. Like the other homework assignments, you will have three attempts to complete this assignment.

I encourage you not to wait until the last moment to begin this assignment. As such, this assignment opens during Week 6. As a review of all the concepts, the Homework Review will be longer than the weekly homework assignments, and many of these problems require difficult calculations.

The Homework Review is worth 100 points. 

Final Exam

During Week 8, you will take a non-proctored Final Exam which will consist of 50 questions from all of the assigned readings throughout the course. These questions consist of multiple-choice questions as well as computational problems.

This exam will be completed in CONNECT.

You will have 2 hours (120 minutes) to take the exam and will be given only one attempt.

The Final Exam is worth 150 points.

The exam will open Thursday of Week 8 at 12:01 am CT and is due by 11:59 pm CT Saturday.

  Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Readings
  • Garrison: Chapter 1
  • Garrison: Chapter 2
Presentations
  • Garrison: Chapter 1 - Narrated PowerPoint
  • Garrison: Chapter 2 - Narrated PowerPoint
Introduction Discussion

Introduce yourself and please give us more than your name. This is your chance to get to know your cohort for the next eight weeks. Include your profession, hobbies, interest in this course, and any other information that can help us get to know you.

Discussion 1

Find a company that interests you and review the information about its operations on their website. Although I encourage you to find your own company, you may choose one of the companies below:

  • Biolea
  • Evian
  • Gulf Craft, INC.

Next, write a brief summary (one paragraph) for the company that includes:

  1. A brief description of the operations of the company 
  2. Two specific examples of possible: 
    a. Fixed costs,
    b. Variable costs, and
    c. Mixed costs.

As you read your peers’ posts, consider how their companies' costs are different or similar to your own. What accounts for the difference or similarity?

Connect Homework 1

Covers Chapters 1 & 2

Readings
  • Garrison: Chapter 3
Presentations
  • Garrison: Chapter 3 - Narrated PowerPoint
Discussion 2: Group Case Study

Within your assigned group, discuss potential answers to the following case study and post your consensus by Sunday:

Ethics and the Manager

Terri Ronsin had recently been transferred to the Home Security Systems Division of National Home Products. Shortly after taking over her new position as divisional controller, she was asked to develop the division’s predetermined overhead rate for the upcoming year. The accuracy of the rate is important because it is used throughout the year and any underapplied or overapplied overhead is closed out to Cost of Goods Sold at the end of the year. National Home Products uses direct labor-hours in all of its divisions as the allocation base for manufacturing overhead.

To compute the predetermined overhead rate, Terri divided her estimate of the total manufacturing overhead for the coming year by the production manager’s estimate of the total direct labor-hours for the coming year. She took her computations to the division’s general manager for approval but was quite surprised when he suggested a modification in the allocation base. Her conversation with the general manager of the Home Security Systems Division, Harry Irving, went like this:

Ronsin: “Here are my calculations for next year’s predetermined overhead rate. If you approve, we can enter the rate into the computer on January 1 and be up and running in the job-order costing system right away this year.”

Irving: “Thanks for coming up with the calculations so quickly, and they look just fine. There is, however, one slight modification I would like to see. Your estimate of the total direct labor-hours for the year is 440,000 hours. How about cutting that to about 420,000 hours?”

Ronsin: “I don’t know if I can do that. The production manager says she will need about 440,000 direct labor-hours to meet the sales projections for the year. Besides, there are going to be over 430,000 direct labor-hours during the current year and sales are projected to be higher next year.”

Irving: “Teri, I know all of that. I would still like to reduce the direct labor-hours in the allocation base to something like 420,000 hours. You probably don’t know that I had an agreement with your predecessor as divisional controller to shave 5% or so off the estimated direct labor-hours every year. That way, we kept a reserve that usually resulted in a big boost to net operating income at the end of the year in December. We called it our Christmas bonus. Corporate headquarters always seemed to be pleased that we could pull off such a miracle at the end of the year. This system has worked well for many years, and I don’t want to change it now.”

Questions to discuss:

  1. Explain how shaving 5% off the estimated direct labor-hours in the allocation base for the predetermined overhead rate usually results in a big boost in net operating income at the end of the year.
  2. Should Terri Ronsin go along with the general manager’s request to reduce the direct labor-hours in the predetermined overhead rate computation to 420,000 direct labor-hours?

It is up to you and your group to determine who will be posting the short synopsis for each week. This final synopsis must be completed within the D2L discussion you used by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Connect Homework 2

Covers Chapter 3

Biweekly Exam 1

This exam opens at 12:01 am CT on Thursday. You will have 2 hours and one attempt to complete the exam.

It covers Chapters 1 - 3 and must be completed in Connect. 

You may use your book to help you find the answers, but your time is limited, so you must be very familiar with your textbook to find the answers quickly.

This exam is worth 100 pts. and is due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Immediately after submitting exam, you will see your score and questions answered incorrectly for 10 minutes.

Readings
  • Garrison: Chapter 4
  • Garrison: Chapter 5
Presentations
  • Garrison: Chapter 4 - Narrated PowerPoint
  • Garrison: Chapter 5 - Narrated PowerPoint
Discussion 3

In late September 2017, Apple Inc. (NYSE: AAPL) announced that it would be releasing three new models of its iPhone in the fourth quarter of 2017: the iPhone X, the iPhone 8 Plus, and the iPhone 8. In addition, it would continue to sell some of the older models.

See Discussion 3 in D2L to view a table that contains the price and cost estimates for the current three new iPhone models plus one older model.

Questions

  1. Which iPhone model is the most profitable for Apple? Which metric are you using to gauge profitability? Defend your choice of metric.
  2. Assume that Apple has unlimited demand for every iPhone model. Which model should it emphasize to maximize profits if skilled labor is a scarce resource?
  3. Why might Apple offer several iPhone models rather than just the one most profitable model?

Copyright 2017 Wendy M. Tietz, LLC

 

Connect Homework 3

Covers Chapter 4-5.

Readings
  • Garrison: Chapter 6
Presentations
  • Garrison: Chapter 6 - Narrated PowerPoint
Discussion 4: Group Case Study

Within your assigned group, discuss potential answers to the following case study and post your consensus by Sunday:

Service Organization; Segment Reporting

Music Teachers, Inc., is an educational association for music teachers that has 20,000 members. The association operates from a central headquarters but has local membership chapters throughout the United States. Monthly meetings are held by the local chapters to discuss recent developments on topics of interest to music teachers. The association’s magazine, Teachers’ Forum, is issued monthly with features about recent developments in the field. The association publishes books and reports and also sponsors professional courses that qualify for continuing professional education credit. The association’s statement of revenues and expenses for the current year is presented below.

Music Teachers, Inc. Statement of Revenues and Expenses For the Year Ended November 30

 Revenues
 $3,275,000 
 Expenses
 
 Salaries
 920,000
 Personnel costs
 230,000
 Occupancy costs
 280,000
 Reimbursement of member costs to local chapters
 600,000
 Other membership services
 500,000
 Printing and paper
 320,000
   
 Postage and shipping
 173,000
 Instructors’ fees
 80,000
 General and administrative
 38,000
 Total expenses
 3,144,000
 Excess of revenues over expenses
 $131,000

 

The board of directors of Music Teachers, Inc. has requested that a segmented income statement be prepared showing the contribution of each segment to the association. The association has four segments: Membership Division, Magazine Subscriptions Division, Books and Reports Division, and Continuing Education Division. Mike Doyle has been assigned responsibility for preparing the segmented income statement, and he has gathered the following data:

  1. The 20,000 members of the association pay dues of $100 per year, of which $20 covers a one-year subscription to the Teachers’ Forum. Other benefits include membership in the association and chapter affiliation. The portion of the dues covering the magazine subscription ($20) should be assigned to the Magazine Subscriptions Division.
  2. A total of 2,500 one-year subscriptions to Teachers’ Forum were also sold last year to nonmembers and libraries at $30 per subscription. In addition to subscriptions, the journal generated $100,000 in advertising revenues.
  3. The costs to produce the Teachers’ Forum magazine included $7 per subscription for printing and paper and $4 per subscription for postage and shipping.
  4. A total of 28,000 technical reports and professional texts were sold by the Books and Reports Division at an average selling price per unit of $25. Average costs per publication were $4 for printing and paper and $2 for postage and shipping.
  5. The association offers a variety of continuing education courses to both members and nonmembers. The one-day courses had a tuition cost of $75 each and were attended by 2,400 students. A total of 1,760 students took two-day courses at a tuition cost of $125 for each student. Outside instructors were paid to teach some courses.
  6. Salary costs and space occupied by division follow:     

 

   Salaries Space Occupied (square feet)
Membership $210,000 2,000
Magazine Subscriptions 150,000 2,000
Books and Reports 300,000 3,000
Continuing Education 180,000 2,000
Corporate Staff 80,000 1,000
 Total $920,000 10,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Personnel costs are 25% of salaries in the separate divisions as well as for the corporate staff. The $280,000 in occupancy costs includes $50,000 in rental cost for a warehouse used by the Books and Reports Division for storage purposes.

g. Printing and paper costs other than for magazine subscriptions and for books and reports relate to the Continuing Education Division.

h. General and administrative expenses include costs relating to overall administration of the association as a whole. The company’s corporate staff does some mailing of materials for general administrative purposes. 

Required:

  1. Prepare a segmented income statement for Music Teachers, Inc. This statement should show the segment margin for each division as well as results for the association as a whole. This segmented income statement may be pasted into the D2L discussion if possible, or you may upload it as an attachment.
  2. Give arguments for and against allocating all costs of the association to the four divisions.

It is up to you and your group to determine who will be posting the short synopsis for each week. This final synopsis must be completed within the D2L discussion you used by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Connect Homework 4

Covers Chapter 6.

Biweekly Exam 2

This exam opens at 12:01 am CT on Thursday. You will have 2 hours and one attempt to complete the exam.

It covers Chapters 4 - 6 and must be completed in Connect. 

You may use your book to help you find the answers, but your time is limited, so you must be very familiar with your textbook to find the answers quickly.

This exam is worth 100 pts. and is due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Immediately after submitting exam, you will see your score and questions answered incorrectly for 10 minutes.

Readings
  • Garrison: Chapter 7
  • Garrison: Chapter 8
Presentations
  • Garrison: Chapter 7 - Narrated PowerPoint
  • Garrison: Chapter 8 - Narrated PowerPoint
Discussion 5

What costs are included for a bottle of water at the JFK International airport if activity-based costing (ABC) is used for product costing?

In a recent Wall Street Journal article (“The Price You Pay for Water at the Airport”), Scott McCartney, April 22, 2015), the cost of a bottle at various airports was compared to the cost of that same bottle of water at a convenience store.

A 20-ounce bottle of Dasani water typically costs about $0.99 at a convenience store. At the JFK International airport in New York City, that bottle of Dasani water is $2.89.

An airport store operator interviewed for the WSJ story stated that the costs of operating airport shops are more expensive than other retail stores because:

  • Off-airport warehouses are needed due to limited inventory space
  • Deliveries to stores are usually made during off-peak hours
  • Deliveries are made in small batches so that everything can go through airport security screening

Questions

  1. Is the cost of an off-airport warehouse considered to be a unit-level, batch-level, product-level, or facility-level cost as it relates to: (a) The airport store and (b) An individual bottle of water
  2. Describe the costs that could be incurred in a small batch delivery of two cases of Dasani water to the store inside the airport from the off-airport warehouse?
  3. How does the constraint that the deliveries must be made during off-peak hours impact the cost of the deliveries?
  4. Are the costs of a delivery of two cases of Dasani water to the store inside the airport from the off-airport warehouse considered to be unit-level, batch-level, product-level, or facility-level costs as they relates to (consider each cost you listed in #2 above separately): (a) The airport store and (b) An individual bottle of water
  5. In an activity-based costing system, what costs would be considered to be part of the cost of an individual bottle of Dasani water at the airport? 
  6. Would the airport store be likely to use the ABC cost for water pricing? Why or why not? 
  7. Would activity-based costing or activity-based management be useful for the airport store? Why or why not?
  8. Answer all of the previous questions. When responding to your peers, compare and contrast your answers. What points do they raise that you had not considered? What similarities are you finding?

Copyright © 2015 by Dr. Wendy Tietz, http://accountingintheheadlines.com/ This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

Connect Homework 5

Covers Chapter 7-8.

Readings
  • Garrison: Chapter 9
  • Garrison: Chapter 10
Presentations
  • Garrison: Chapter 9 - Narrated PowerPoint
  • Garrison: Chapter 10 - Narrated PowerPoint
Discussion 6: Group Case Study

Within your assigned group, discuss potential answers to the following case study and post your consensus by Sunday:

The Little Theatre is a nonprofit organization devoted to staging plays for children. The theater has a very small full-time professional administrative staff. Through a special arrangement with the actors’ union, actors and directors rehearse without pay and are paid only for actual performances.

The Little Theatre had tentatively planned to put on six different productions with a total of 108 performances. For example, one of the productions was Peter Rabbit, which had a six-week run with three performances on each weekend. The costs from the current year’s planning budget appear below. 

The Little Theatre
Costs from the Planning Budget
For the Year Ended December 31

 Budgeted number of productions 
 6
 Budgeted number of performances
 108
 Actors and directors wages 
 $216,000 
 Stagehands wages 
 32,400 
 Ticket booth personnel and ushers wages 
 16,200 
 Scenery, costumes, and props
 108,000 
 Theater hall rent 
 54,000 
 Printed programs 
 27,000
 Publicity
 12,000
 Administrative expenses 
 43,200 
Total  $508,000

 

Some of the costs vary with the number of productions, some with the number of performances, and some are fixed and depend on neither the number of productions nor the number of performances. The costs of scenery, costumes, props, and publicity vary with the number of productions. It doesn’t make any difference how many times Peter Rabbit is performed; the cost of the scenery is the same. Likewise, the cost of publicizing a play with posters and radio commercials is the same whether there are 10, 20, or 30 performances of the play. On the other hand, the wages of the actors, directors, stagehands, ticket booth personnel, and ushers vary with the number of performances. The greater the number of performances, the higher the wage costs will be. Similarly, the costs of renting the hall and printing the programs will vary with the number of performances. Administrative expenses are more difficult to analyze, but the best estimate is that approximately 75% of the budgeted costs are fixed, 15% depend on the number of productions staged, and the remaining 10% depend on the number of performances. 

After the beginning of the year, the board of directors of the theater authorized expanding the theater’s program to seven productions and a total of 168 performances. Not surprisingly, actual costs were considerably higher than the costs from the planning budget. (Grants from donors and ticket sales were also correspondingly higher, but are not shown here.) Data concerning the actual costs appear below: 

Actual number of productions
7
Actual number of performances
168
Actors and directors wages
$341,800
Stagehands wages
49,700
Ticket booth personnel and ushers wages
25,900
Scenery, costumes, and props
130,600
Theater hall rent
78,000
Printed programs
38,300
Publicity
15,100
Administrative expenses
47,500
Total $726,900

Required:

  1. Using Exhibit 9–8 as your guide (found in your textbook on p. 422), prepare a flexible budget performance report for the year that shows both spending variances and activity variances.  This flexible budget may be pasted into the D2L discussion if possible, or you may upload it as an attachment.
  2. If you were on the board of directors of the theater, would you be pleased with how well costs were controlled during the year? Why, or why not?
  3. The cost formulas provide figures for the average cost per production and average cost per performance. How accurate do you think these figures would be for predicting the cost of a new production or of an additional performance of a particular production?

It is up to you and your group to determine who will be posting the short synopsis for each week. This final synopsis must be completed within the D2L discussion you used by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Connect Homework 6

Covers Chapter 9-10.

Biweekly Exam 3

This exam opens at 12:01 am CT on Thursday. You will have 2 hours and one attempt to complete the exam.

It covers Chapters 9 - 10 and must be completed in Connect. 

You may use your book to help you find the answers, but your time is limited, so you must be very familiar with your textbook to find the answers quickly.

This exam is worth 100 pts. and is due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Immediately after submitting exam, you will see your score and questions answered incorrectly for 10 minutes.

Readings
  • Garrison: Chapter 12 (Including the Appendix)
  • Garrison: Chapter 13
Presentations
  • Garrison: Chapter 12 - Narrated PowerPoint
  • Garrison: Chapter 13 - Narrated PowerPoint
Discussion 7

What costs would the New England Patriots have considered when analyzing the purchase of team planes and when pricing the rental of its team planes?

The New England Patriots recently became the first National Football League (NFL) franchise to buy its own team aircraft. The Patriots purchased two Boeing 767 planes for a total of about $10 million. Both planes have been painted with the team’s logo and colors.

The Patriots will use the planes for the ten round trips for its away games during the 2017 – 2018 season. If the team would make the playoffs or Super Bowl, it would also use the planes for those games.

If a franchise does not own its own planes, the costs of chartering planes is estimated to be about $4 million for the season.

The Patriots management has indicated that it may rent out the planes when not in use by the team.

Discussion Questions

  1. List the costs that a team could incur when chartering aircraft to fly its team to the away games. Use your imagination.
  2. List the costs that a team could incur when owning and flying its own aircraft for transporting the team to away games. Again, use your imagination.
  3. Compare your two lists of costs. What costs appear on both lists? What costs would have been relevant to the New England Patriots’ aircraft purchase decision?
  4. What qualitative factors would have influenced the Patriots’ aircraft decision?
  5. What costs would be relevant to the pricing decision for renting the planes when not in use by the team?
  6. Do you think aircraft depreciation is a relevant cost to consider when pricing the rental of the Patriots’ aircraft? Why or why not?
  7. What capital budgeting tools could the Patriots have used to analyze this aircraft purchase decision?

Answer all of the previous questions. When responding to your peers, compare and contrast your answers. What points do they raise that you had not considered? What similarities are you finding?

Copyright © 2015 by Dr. Wendy Tietz, http://accountingintheheadlines.com/ This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

Connect Homework 7

Covers Chapter 12-13.

Readings
  • Review all chapters from Weeks 1 – 7.
Presentations
  • Review all Narrated PowerPoints from Weeks 1 – 7. 
Discussion 8

Where did you encounter struggle during this course, and what did you do to deal with it? What areas do you feel confident that you understand?

What are your next steps? Which of those steps will come easiest? Where will the terrain become rocky? What can you do now to navigate the road ahead with the most success?

Homework Review (Comprehensive)

Covers Weeks 1 – 7 readings. 

Final Exam

This Final Exam consists of 50 questions from all of the assigned readings throughout the course. These questions consist of multiple-choice questions as well as computational problems.

This exam must be completed in CONNECT.

You will have 2 hours (120 minutes) to take the exam and will be given only one attempt.

The Final Exam is worth 150 points.

The exam will open Thursday of Week 8 at 12:01 am CT and is due by 11:59 pm CT Saturday.

  Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a cumulative process that begins with the first college learning opportunity. Students are responsible for knowing the Academic Integrity policy and procedures and may not use ignorance of either as an excuse for academic misconduct. Columbia College recognizes that the vast majority of students at Columbia College maintain high ethical academic standards; however, failure to abide by the prohibitions listed herein is considered academic misconduct and may result in disciplinary action, a failing grade on the assignment, and/or a grade of "F" for the course.

Additionally, all required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

No late assignments will be accepted without extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the student and with instructor notification prior to the due date.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

  Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance.  If you have questions about the Ed Map storefront, please contact the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center.  If you have technical problems with the VitalSource eText reader, please contact VitalSource.  Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.