[ Logo ] Graduate Catalog
Columbia College of Missouri
 

COLUMBIA COLLEGE

2002-2003 GRADUATE CATALOG

Table of Contents
Mission Statement
Administrative Offices
Map of Columbia College Campus
Calendar
College Profile
The Campus
Admission Policy
Tuition and Fees
Financial Aid
Campus Life
Academic Policies, Regulations
and Procedures
Academic Support Services
Master of Arts in Teaching
MAT Programs
Education Course Descriptions
Master of Business Administration
Business Course Descriptions
Master of Science in Criminal Justice
Criminal Justice Course Descriptions
Personnel Directory

Columbia College does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of any status or condition protected by applicable federal or state law in the administration of its educational policies, admission, financial assistance, employment, educational programs or activities.

Columbia College reserves the right to change prices, policies, or practices as described in this catalog as circumstances, efficiency of operation, and fiscal contingencies may require.

Columbia College Statement of Mission

Columbia College assists individuals in gaining a broad understanding of the liberal arts and sciences through exemplary teaching. Learning is made possible by the discovery, acquisition, and application of knowledge, diverse learning experiences, and the totality of interaction among faculty, staff, and students. In both undergraduate and graduate education, the College encourages intellectual growth, preparation for the world of work, involved citizenship, and lifelong learning in order to pursue excellence in human endeavor.

Approved by the Board of Trustees
May 17, 1996

Columbia College Description

Columbia College, a private, coeducational institution, offers associate, baccalaureate, and masters degrees that prepare students of differing backgrounds and abilities for entry level or advanced positions in various occupations and professions. Founded in 1851 by charter of the Missouri legislature and then named Christian Female College, Columbia College assumed its current name and became coeducational in 1970. Although it retains a covenant with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Columbia College is a nonsectarian institution.

The College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools and holds specialized accreditation in its Education, Nursing, and Social Work programs. Students may enroll in either day or evening classes at the home campus in Columbia, Missouri, in its Extended Studies Division at one of many sites around the country, or in distance education classes.

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES

Columbia College Switchboard 573/875-8700
General Fax 573/875-7209
Academic Affairs
   Program offerings, faculty, academic advising
573/875-7500
Admissions Office
   FAX
   Requirements for day, evening and graduate admission, application forms, catalogs, campus tours, transfer information, and course offerings
573/875-7352
573/875-7506
Alumni Affairs
   Homecoming, alumni groups and activities, alumni records
573/875-7211
Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies
   Academic progress, graduate study coordination
573/875-7580
Athletics
   Intercollegiate sports, recreation
573/875-7433
Campus Life
   Student activities, student daily life, ADA services
573/875-7400
Career Services
   Career planning/placement, off-campus jobs, career opportunities, testing
573/875-7425
Center for Academic Excellence
   Tutoring, academic enrichment
573/875-7616
Counseling Services
   Personal/group counseling
573/875-7423
Development Office
   Donations, gifts, bequests
573/875-7561
Distance Education Office
   On-line courses
573/875-7422
Evaluations Office
   FAX
   Credit evaluation, transfer information
573/875-7671
573/875-7391
Extended Studies Division
   FAX
   Site locations, academic offerings, session dates
573/875-7661
573/875-7660
Financial Aid Office
   FAX
   Information, application forms, assistance
573/875-7390
573/875-7452
Health Services
   Information, consultation, referral
573/875-7432
International Programs Coordinator
   Immigration issues, practical training
573/875-7686
Library
   FAX
   Reference information, library hours
573/875-7374
573/875-7379
Master of Arts in Teaching, Graduate Program Director 573/875-7679
Master of Business Administration, Graduate Program Director 573/875-7558
Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Graduate Program Director 573/875-7472
Plant and Facilities Operations
   Room event scheduling, building maintenance, parking permits
573/875-7300
President 573/875-7200
Public Relations and Marketing
   Advertising, publicity, publications
573/875-7230
Registration
   FAX
573/875-7526
573/875-7392
Residential Life
   Residence hall accommodations
573/875-7450
Security
   Parking permits, emergencies, safety
573/875-7315
Student Accounts Office
   FAX
   Payment of fees, repayment of loans, general business policies, current student financial obligations to the College
573/875-7252
573/875-7262
Technology Services Center
   FAX
   Helpdesk, e-mail, internet access, computer resources
573/875-7313
573/875-7320
Transcripts
   FAX
573/875-7652
573/875-7392
Wellness Center
   Student activities, health related issues
573/875-7420

General Web Site Address: http://www.ccis.edu

Graduate Programs URL: http://www.ccis.edu/graduate/


2002-2003 ACADEMIC CALENDAR

Early Fall Session (02/M31)
Late Fall Session (02/M32)
Winter Session (02/M33)
Spring Session (02/M34)
Summer Session I (02/M35)
Summer Session II (02/M35)
Summer Session III (02/M35)

Early Fall Session (02/M31) August - October 2002

MonJun 24Registration begins for returning and new graduate students
MonAug 26Graduate classes begin
 Aug 26-30 Late registration (ends 5:00 pm; $35 fee)
FriAug 30Last day to add classes; last day to drop a course without academic record and financial liability (ends 5:00 pm)
MonSep 2Labor Day Holiday; classes do not meet, offices and library closed (library closed Aug 31, Sep 1-2)
FriOct 4Last day to withdraw from classes with grade of W (ends 5:00 pm)
ThursOct 17Classes end
MonOct 21Grades due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon

Late Fall Session (02/M32) October - December 2002

MonSep 16Registration begins for returning and new graduate students
MonOct 28Graduate classes begin
 Oct 28-Nov 1Late registration (ends 5:00 pm; $35 fee)
FriNov 1Last day to add classes; last day to drop a course without academic record and financial liability (ends 5:00 pm)
 Nov 25-Dec 1Fall/Thanksgiving Break; Day and Graduate classes do not meet; Evening classes meet Nov 25-26; offices and library open Nov 25-27, offices and library closed Nov 28-29; library open Nov 30, 1:00-6:00 pm and Dec 1, 2:00-11:00 pm
MonDec 2Classes resume
FriDec 6Last day to withdraw from classes with grade of W (ends 5:00 pm)
Holiday Lighting Ceremony/Reception
ThursDec 19Classes end
FriDec 20Grades for graduating students due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon
SatDec 21COMMENCEMENT, 2:00 pm
 Dec 23-25 Offices and library closed
ThursDec 26Grades due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon
WedJan 1Offices and library closed

Winter Session (02/M33) January - March 2003

MonNov 18Registration begins for returning and new graduate students
MonJan 13Graduate classes begin
 Jan 13-17 Late registration (ends 5:00 pm; $35 fee)
FriJan 17Last day to add classes; last day to drop a course without academic record and financial liability (ends 5:00 pm)
MonJan 20Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday observance; offices and library closed
FriFeb 21Last day to withdraw from classes with grade of W (ends 5:00 pm)
ThursMar 6Classes end
MonMar 10Grades due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon

Spring Session (02/M34) March - May 2003

MonFeb 3Registration begins for returning and new graduate students
WedMar 12Graduate classes begin
 Mar 12-18 Late registration (ends 5:00 pm; $35 fee)
FriMar 18Last day to add classes; last day to drop a course without academic record and financial liability (ends 5:00 pm)
 Mar 24-30 Spring Break; Graduate and Day classes do not meet; Evening classes are in session
TuesApr 22Last day to withdraw from classes with grade of W (ends 5:00 pm)
 Apr 25-27 Alumni Reunion Weekend
ThursMay 8Classes end
FriMay 9Grades for graduating students due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon
SatMay 10COMMENCEMENT, 2:00 pm
MonMay 12Grades due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon
 May 12-Jun 1Library open 8:00 am-5:00 pm, Monday-Friday

Summer Session I (02/M35) June - July 2003

MonApr 7Registration begins for returning and new graduate students
MonMay 26Memorial Day Holiday; offices and library closed
MonJun 2Graduate classes begin
 Jun 2-6Late registration (ends 5:00 pm, $35 fee)
Library summer hours: Monday-Thursday, 8:00 am-10:00 pm; Friday, 8:00 am-5:00 pm; Saturday, 1:00-6:00 pm; Sunday, 2:00-8:00 pm
FriJun 6Last day to add classes; last day to drop a course without academic record and financial liability (ends 5:00 pm)
FriJul 4Independence Day Holiday (no classes; offices and library closed)
FriJul 11Last day to withdraw from classes with grade of W (ends 5:00 pm)
ThursJul 24Classes end
FriJul 25Grades for graduating students due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon
 Jul 25-Aug 22Library open 8:00 am-5:00 pm, Monday-Friday
SatJul 26COMMENCEMENT, 2:00 pm
MonJul 28Grades due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon

Summer Session II (02/M35) June 2003

MonApr 7Registration begins for returning and new graduate students
MonMay 26Memorial Day Holiday; offices and library closed
MonJun 2Graduate classes begin
 Jun 2-4Late registration (ends 5:00 pm, $35 fee)
Library summer hours: Monday-Thursday, 8:00 am-10:00 pm; Friday, 8:00 am-5:00 pm; Saturday, 1:00-6:00 pm; Sunday, 2:00-8:00 pm
WedJun 4Last day to add classes; last day to drop a course without academic record and financial liability (ends 5:00 pm)
MonJun 16Last day to withdraw from classes with grade of W (ends 5:00 pm)
WedJun 25Graduate classes end
MonJun 30Grades due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon

Summer Session III (02/M35) July 2003

MonApr 7Registration begins for returning and new graduate students
MonMay 26Memorial Day Holiday; offices and library closed
MonJun 30Graduate classes begin
Library summer hours: Monday-Thursday, 8:00 am-10:00 pm; Friday, 8:00 am-5:00 pm; Saturday, 1:00-6:00 pm; Sunday, 2:00-8:00 pm
 Jun 30-Jul 2Late registration (ends 5:00 pm, $35 fee)
WedJul 2Last day to add classes; last day to drop a course without academic record and financial liability (ends 5:00 pm)
FriJul 4Independence Day Holiday (no classes; offices and library closed)
MonJul 14Last day to withdraw from classes with grade of W (ends 5:00 pm)
ThursJul 23Graduate classes end
FriJul 25Grades for graduating students due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon
 Jul 25-Aug 22Library open 8:00 am-5:00 pm, Monday-Friday
SatJul 26COMMENCEMENT, 2:00 pm
MonJul 28Grades due in Registration Office by 12:00 noon

College Profile

Classification: Private, coeducational undergraduate and graduate-degree granting college with a liberal arts and sciences foundation. Carnegie Foundation classification: Baccalaureate Colleges II.

Location: Home campus in Columbia, Missouri (population 76,000 plus over 25,000 students at three separate colleges), on Interstate 70, halfway between St. Louis and Kansas City. Air service via major airline commuter to Columbia Regional Airport. Twenty-seven Extended Studies campuses throughout the United States and in Puerto Rico. The Extended Studies Division locations are Redstone Arsenal, Alabama; Coast Guard Island/Sacramento, Lemoore and Los Alamitos, California; Orlando, Patrick Air Force Base, and Jacksonville, Florida; Freeport, Lake County, Crystal Lake, and Elgin, Illinois; Aurora, Colorado; Hancock Field, New York; Ft. Worth, Texas; Salt Lake City, Utah; Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico; Everett/Marysville and Whidbey Island, Washington; and, within Missouri, Kansas City, Fort Leonard Wood, Jefferson City, Moberly, Rolla, St. Louis, Christian County/Marshfield and Lake Ozark.

Degrees Conferred: Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Social Work, Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Business Administration, and Master of Science in Criminal Justice.

Home Campus: 18 buildings on a 30-acre campus four blocks from Columbia's downtown area.

Library: 70,000 volumes, 500 periodicals, nearly 2,500 audio-visual items, access to on-line resources.

Enrollment: More than 800 full and part-time day students, representing 15 states and 29 foreign countries; more than 1400 evening and graduate students, and more than 6,000 Extended Studies students.

Athletics: Member, American Midwest Conference (men's soccer and basketball; women's basketball, volleyball and softball) and a variety of intramural sports.

Accreditation: Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Approved for teacher preparation by the Missouri State Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Associate in Science degree in Nursing accredited by the Missouri State Board of Nursing and the National League for Nursing. Bachelor of Social Work accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

The Higher Learning Commission
North Central Association
Commission on Institutions
30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
Chicago, IL 60602-2504
Telephone: 312/263-0456 or 1-800/621-7440
E-mail: info@ncacihe.org

Council on Social Work Education
1725 Duke Street, Suite 500
Alexandria, VA 22314-3457
Telephone: 703/683-8080
E-mail: info@cswe.org (social work education) or accred@cswe.org (social work accreditation)

Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
P.O. Box 480
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Telephone: 573/751-6504
E-mail: mlucas@mail.dese.state.mo.us

Missouri State Board of Nursing
3605 Missouri Boulevard
P.O. Box 656
Jefferson City, MO 65102-0656
Telephone: 573/751-0681
E-mail: http://www.ecodev.state.mo.us/pr/nursing

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC)
61 Broadway--33rd floor
New York, NY 10006
Telephone: 212/363-5555 ext. 153
or 1-800/669-1656 ext. 153
E-mail: www.accrediting-comm-nlnac.org


THE HOME CAMPUS

Banks Hall. A residence hall completed in 1967, Banks houses 108 students in double rooms. There are hall baths, special study rooms, and activity lounges on each floor. A computer lab is located on the second floor.

Bass Commons. Dedicated in 1978, the front campus area is a park-like setting and location for the Ivy Chain ceremony.

Brown Hall. Constructed in 1995, this building houses studios for painting, design, ceramics, drawing, printmaking and photography, as well as art faculty offices. General classrooms including the multimedia classroom are located on the lower level.

Buchanan Hall. Constructed in 1977 and named for Genevieve Koontz Buchanan, this building provides general classrooms, student computer labs, and houses the administrative computer and technology services centers.

Cultural Arts Center. International art gallery and educational center, located at 709 North Eighth Street.

Dorsey Hall. Attached to the east wing of St. Clair Hall by a covered walkway, Dorsey Hall is primarily a classroom building, completed in 1911. Dorsey Hall also houses the chapel, classrooms and the Jane Froman studio. Dorsey Gym is used for receptions, conferences and other special events.

Dulany Hall. Built in 1965, Dulany Hall contains dining facilities. It is also used as a multipurpose area for social functions and receptions, and houses the Trustee Room and Cougar Room.

Hughes Hall. Built in a traditional English design in 1939, Hughes Hall houses 64 women in double-room suites. Kitchen facilities are located on each floor and a formal parlor is on the main floor. A computer lab is also available on the main floor. The ground level houses the College Bookstore.

Larson Gallery. Dedicated in May 1996, Larson Gallery is located on the first floor of Brown Hall. It features periodic exhibitions of visual art including works from practicing artists and various collections. It is free and open to the public.

Launer Auditorium and Student Center. Launer Auditorium, built in 1903 and attached to St. Clair Hall by a covered walkway, was renovated in 1992 and again in 1997. It seats over 500 for convocations and artistic performances. The ground level houses the Wellness Center, the Student Center, and associated student government and campus life administrative offices.

Miller Hall. Completed in 1960, Miller Hall is the largest residence hall on campus, housing 154 students in double-room suites connected by full baths. It contains kitchen facilities, study rooms and a computer lab.

Missouri Hall. Completed in 1920, Missouri Hall houses the admissions, registration, Student Support Services office, transcripts and evaluation offices, the Center for Academic Excellence and rooms for short-stay guests of the College.

Recreation and Events Center. Completed in 2002, the Recreation and Events Center is attached to the Southwell Complex Gymnasium and includes two full-sized basketball, tennis and volleyball courts, as well as offices, locker rooms and a conference room. This facility houses the Athletic Hall of Fame and is primarily used for student recreation, intramurals and commencements.

Robnett-Spence Laboratories and Health Center. Built in 1969, Robnett-Spence houses science laboratories and the Health Center.

Security Office. The security office is located in the Cultural Arts Center, 709 North Eighth Street.

St. Clair Hall. The main administration building, St. Clair was built in 1900 from pressed brick and Bedford stone in an Elizabethan style. Most administrative offices and faculty offices are located on the first and second floors. The third floor houses faculty offices, general classrooms and the college archive. Mail and duplicating services, the accounting office, and the financial aid office are located on the garden level.

Southwell Complex Gymnasium. Dedicated in 1988, the Southwell Gymna-sium is home to the Columbia College Cougar basketball and volleyball squads. Southwell also houses locker rooms and the sports information coordinators office.

Southy Building. Built in 1986, this building houses athletic offices and the indoor fitness center.

Stafford Library. Completed in fall of 1989, the J.W. and Lois Stafford Library houses all library collections and audiovisual materials. The Curriculum Resource Center and one classroom are also located in this building.

Wightman Maintenance Building. This building houses the maintenance and housekeeping departments.

Williams Hall. Purchased in 1851, Williams Hall is the oldest college building in continuous use for educational purposes west of the Mississippi River, and has been designated an historical site. Previously the music building, Williams Hall now houses business administration faculty offices and general classrooms.


ADMISSION POLICY

The standards of admission to Columbia College graduate programs require evidence of personal integrity and responsibility, academic preparation, and leadership potential. Applicants must present a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average from a regionally accredited institution(s) or a departmentally approved GRE or GMAT score. Criteria for admission apply to all categories of any graduate program at Columbia College unless otherwise specified.

Graduate applicants are expected to present undergraduate coursework achievement commensurate with graduate program requirements. It is expected that applicants have completed a sound undergraduate degree program from a regionally accredited institution(s). Each applicants record is carefully examined to determine if the student has potential for successful completion of a masters degree program at Columbia College.

Students entering graduate school at Columbia College are expected to possess computer skills equivalent to those obtained from a basic computer literacy course, such as CISS 170 Introduction to Computer Information Systems. This includes competency with word processing, spreadsheets, and computer presentation software.

Students not meeting graduate program admission standards may petition for admittance. Petitions must be accompanied by written justification and substantiating documentation to support the candidates request. Consideration for admission will be at the discretion of the respective department. It is important that applicants read and understand requirements before making application.

Admission Categories

All categories are not available in every program. Refer to the categories below for Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ) admissions options.

Full Program Admission

Students who meet the admissions criteria and wish to pursue a graduate degree are classified as full program admits. Fully admitted graduate students may enroll for undergraduate or graduate courses for which they have met prerequisites.

MAT Full Program: Students applying for Full Program admission must complete steps 1-5 listed under Application Procedures (page 17).

MBA Full Program: Students applying for Full Program admission must complete steps 1-4 listed under Application Procedures (page 17).

MSCJ Full Program: Students applying for Full Program admission must complete steps 1-4 listed under Application Procedures (page 17).

Student-at-Large

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university may be admitted as a Student-at-Large and enroll in courses for which they have the prerequisites. Students-at-Large may complete a maximum of twelve (12) graduate semester hours without full program acceptance. After completion of twelve graduate semester hours, Students-at-Large must submit complete application materials to be considered for full program admission. Students-at-Large are subject to the same academic regulations and requirements as all degree-seeking students.

MAT Student-at-Large: Students applying as Student-at-Large must submit a completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 fee, transcripts from all degree-granting institutions and a notarized affidavit of moral character.

MSCJ Student-at-Large: Students applying as Student-at-Large must submit a completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 fee, and transcripts from all degree-granting institutions.

Non-Degree Seeking

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree but do not wish to earn a graduate degree at Columbia College may enroll in graduate courses as non-degree seeking students. Non-degree seeking students may complete a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours of graduate-level coursework and are not eligible for financial aid. Non-degree application requirements vary among programs.

MAT Non-Degree: Those applying as Non-Degree Seeking students must submit a completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 fee, transcripts from all degree-granting institutions, and a notarized affidavit of moral character .

MBA Non-Degree: Non-Degree Seeking students must complete steps 1-4 listed under Application Procedures (page 17), complete all prerequisite coursework, and present a minimum 3.0 undergraduate cumulative grade point average.

MSCJ Non-Degree: Non-Degree Seeking students must submit a completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 fee, and submit a transcript from all degree-granting institutions.

Post Baccalaureate

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university but who have not completed necessary undergraduate prerequisites for the respective graduate program may enroll in undergraduate courses.

MAT Post Baccalaureate: Students applying for Post Baccalaureate status must complete steps 1-5 listed under Application Procedures (page 17). Post Baccalaureate students seeking the MAT degree and/or teacher certification may enroll in graduate courses with permission from the Education Department. Post Baccalaureate students must earn a grade of B or higher in undergraduate and graduate courses.

MBA Post Baccalaureate: Students applying for Post Baccalaureate status must complete steps 1-4 listed under Application Procedures (page 17). Students must earn a grade of B or higher in undergraduate prerequisites in order to be considered for full admission to the MBA program.

MSCJ Post Baccalaureate: Students applying for Post Baccalaureate status must submit a completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 fee and transcripts from all degree granting institutions. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in undergraduate prerequisites in order to be considered for full admission to the MSCJ program. Post Baccalaureate students seeking the MSCJ degree may enroll in graduate courses with permission from the Criminal Justice and Social Work Department.

Application Procedures

To be considered for full admission to the Columbia College Graduate Program, an applicants file must include the following materials. All documents should be sent to Graduate Admissions, Columbia College, 1001 Rogers Street, Columbia, MO 65216.

Graduate programs and individual graduate level courses may be offered at some Extended Studies Division sites. Applications for admission for these programs or courses must be submitted through the Site Director. Students interested in taking graduate courses at Extended Studies Division Campuses should contact the respective location for information.

  1. A completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 application ee. Checks should be made payable to Columbia College.
  2. Official transcripts from each undergraduate and graduate college or university attended.
  3. Three completed Columbia College graduate program recommendation forms. All should attest to the applicants ability to successfully perform graduate work and at least 80% of the quantified descriptors should be in the two highest categories.
  4. A personal goal statement which establishes a correlation between the goals of the graduate degree program and the applicants personal and professional goals.
  5. MAT applicants must also submit an affidavit of moral character and, if available, proof of teacher certification.
Graduate application files will not be reviewed for admission earlier than a minimum of six months prior to the intended term of enrollment. To be guaranteed consideration for enrollment in a session, the completed file needs to be received two (2) weeks prior to the beginning of any academic session.

A completed application file is required before Columbia College may process an application for financial aid.

Specific standards for admission to the Master of Arts in Teaching program are listed on page 56, to the Master of Business Administration program on page 72 or to the Master of Science in Criminal Justice program on page 79.

International Students

All international students are required to submit the following materials to be considered for graduate admission. All documents and fees must be received before Columbia College will issue an I-20 Form. Application materials should be sent to Graduate Admissions, Graduate Programs, Columbia College, 1001 Rogers Street, Columbia, MO 65216.
  1. A completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 (U.S. dollars) application fee. Checks should be made payable to Columbia College.
  2. Proof of English language proficiency as evidenced by a TOEFL score of at least 550 on the paper-based exam or 213 on the computer-based exam.
  3. Official transcripts in the native language from each undergraduate and graduate college or university attended, translated to English and notarized by the translator.
  4. Three completed Columbia College graduate program recommendation forms. All should attest to the applicants ability to successfully perform graduate work and at least 80% of the quantified descriptors should be in the two highest categories.
  5. A personal goal statement which establishes a correlation between the goals of the graduate degree program and the applicants personal and professional goals and a summary of relevant work experience.
  6. MAT applicants also submit an affidavit of moral character and, if available, proof of teacher certification.
  7. A completed Certificate of Financial Support and official bank documents attesting to the applicants or the sponsors ability to pay tuition, books, supplies, fees, and living expenses for one year.
  8. Students transferring to Columbia College from an institution within the United States must complete a Transfer Eligibility form and furnish a copy of a passport, valid visa, I-94 and I-20 from the last school attended.

Readmission

Students who have earned graduate credit at Columbia College but have voluntarily withdrawn for five sessions or more must apply to the Admissions Office for readmission. Returning students who have earned graduate credit at another institution must submit a transcript(s) for evaluation of transfer credit. No more than nine semester hours of graduate degree requirements may be fulfilled by transfer coursework. Catalog policies, procedures, and degree requirements in effect at the time of readmission will govern all decisions regarding subsequent procedures and requirements.

TUITION AND FEES

Application Fee $ 25
Graduate Tuition (per semester hour) $ 215
Audit Fee (per semester hour) $ 90
Course Extension Fee $ 100*
Late Registration Fee $ 35
Student Yearly Parking Fee $ 30
Graduation Fee $ 100
Transcript Fee $ 7.50

*Course Extension Fee applies to EDUC 508E Integrative Project and culminating experience in the Master of Arts in Teaching.

All fees are subject to change without notice.

Students enrolled as graduate students pay graduate tuition for courses receiving graduate credit, and undergraduate tuition for courses receiving undergraduate credit. Charges vary depending on the combination of graduate and undergraduate courses.

Payment plans are available; contact the Accounting Office for more information. Late registration for all sessions begins on the first day of classes. A $35 late registration fee is charged to all students registering on or after the first day of classes.

POLICIES ON PAYMENTS, CREDITS, AND REFUNDS

When an applicant is admitted to the graduate program, the student, the parents, or the guardians accept the standard payment policy of Columbia College. Students incur financial liability when they complete and sign an official Columbia College course registration form. Full payment is due at that time. Liability is not dependent upon a student receiving a billing statement.

Educational expenses may include tuition, textbooks, lab fees, and any miscellaneous fee related to the course(s). The personal payment portion of the students educational expenses (educational expenses less financial aid or assistance awarded) is due in full at the time of registration (for additional information concerning financial aid, please refer to the Financial Aid section of the Graduate Catalog).

Deferred Payment Plan

If full payment is not possible, students may request a deferred payment plan. The arrangement requires payment of one half of the personal payment portion at the time of registration. The student must sign a deferred payment agreement for the remaining half with a maturity date no later than the last day of the session or before registering for a subsequent session. Deferred payment plans are valid for only one session and must be requested for each individual session.

Students with pending financial aid are required to sign a deferred payment contract.

Failure to Pay

Students are financially responsible for the payment of all fees charged to their accounts such as tuition, textbooks, lab fees, and all miscellaneous fees. Students may not register or attend future sessions if the financial obligations for which the student is responsible are not paid in full.

The personal payment portion of a students account that remains unpaid after the end of the session may be assessed a 1% finance charge each month until the account is paid in full.

Failure to comply with the payment policies of the College may result in further collection activity by an outside collection agency or attorney. When this action occurs, students are responsible for paying all collection expenses which can, in some cases, exceed 50% of the original balance owed. Although every effort is made to contact a student prior to submission to a collection agency, Columbia College reserves the right to submit a students account for collection at any time when the student fails to remit the personal payment portion of the account balance.

Applying Federal Financial Aid

If the student has applied for and been awarded financial assistance, the aid, excluding college employment programs, is subtracted from the balance owed to determine the amount to be paid or deferred. Aid in the form of a Stafford (subsidized and unsubsidized) Loan is considered on the deferred payment plan only if awarded by the Financial Aid Office.

Employer Tuition Assistance

Students who receive employer tuition assistance may have the costs of educational expenses paid by their employer through direct billing or through reimbursement. Students should check with their employers to determine which plan is appropriate for them.
  1. Direct Billing: A student whose employer offers direct payment to the College must ensure that the College receives a letter from the employer which authorizes and describes the conditions of such an arrangement. The letter must be on file in the Student Accounts Office.
  2. Reimbursement: A student attending under employer reimbursement is required to follow the standard payment policy and then receive reimbursement following guidelines established by his/her employer.
Under either form of tuition assistance, students are responsible for any portion of the educational fees not paid by their employers. Students whose employers have contingencies on payments (such as attaining a certain grade) are required to pay as if they did not have employer tuition assistance and will be reimbursed after the employer makes payment.

Military Tuition Assistance (MTA)

Students receiving military tuition assistance (MTA) are required to present an approved MTA form at the time of registration. Students are personally responsible for any tuition or miscellaneous fees not paid by the military and are required to follow the standard payment policy for their portion of educational fees. Students may not register for a subsequent session if they have a balance due from previous sessions. It is recommended that military students contact the appropriate educational services officer for guidance and assistance in completing MTA paperwork.

Veterans Educational Assistance

An individual who is currently serving or has served in our nations armed forces may be eligible for educational assistance from the Veterans Administration (VA). Eligible students must complete paperwork required to establish VA eligibility at the time of registration. The VA pays benefits directly to eligible individuals. Students receiving VA benefits are, therefore, personally responsible for payment for all of their educational fees and are required to follow the standard payment policy of the College.

Dropping a Class

Financial liability is assessed at the completion of the drop period for each session. If students drop a class prior to the end of the drop period, no financial or academic liability is incurred. If students drop a class after the drop period, they are financially liable for the full amount of tuition. No reduction of charges is made for laboratory/course fees, etc.

Withdrawal from College

After classes begin, tuition charges (if applicable) are determined by the following schedule should the student complete a total withdrawal from Columbia College:

Time Frame
(Count all days,including weekends)
Charge
Before the 1st day through the 5th day of termNo charge
After the 5th day of term100% of original charges

For students who are recipients of federal Title IV student aid, refunds will be made in accordance with federal regulation 34 CFR 668.22. A current schedule is available in the Financial Aid Office and in the Financial Aid portion of the course catalog.

Students receiving financial assistance should be aware that their financial aid package could be affected should they elect to drop a course. For additional information, please refer to the Financial Aid portion of the catalog.

Active Service

Columbia College recognizes that individuals serving in both National Guard and Reserve units may be in need of tuition refunds or credits if called to active service. Columbia College will assist students called to active military service with options regarding their registration in classes including, but not limited to, course work completion, tuition refunds, or tuition credits.

Financial Aid

To be eligible for federal financial aid, applicants must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Before any aid is awarded or a loan certified, federal data must be accessible by the electronic Institutional Student Information Report (ISIR). To insure this, please make certain that the Columbia College federal school code (002456) is entered on the FAFSA. All applicants must meet eligibility requirements according to established institutional policy and be seeking a degree with Columbia College. Policies are subject to change without notice. Students should allow two to four weeks for aid processing. Students may receive aid at only one institution during the same enrollment period, and must be enrolled at least half-time for each session in which they receive aid.

International graduate students are not eligible to receive financial aid.

Federal Stafford Loan

Students may borrow to finance their education. The Subsidized Stafford Loan is based on federally-defined need while the Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is not based on federally-defined need. Students may apply for both loan programs for a maximum annual amount of $18,500 or the cost of attendance as defined by federal guidelines.

Please follow the procedures listed below for securing a Federal Stafford Loan:

  1. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid either in paper form or on-line at www.fafsa.gov;
  2. Obtain and complete a loan data sheet from the Financial Aid Office;
  3. First-time borrowers at Columbia College are required to complete entrance counseling. (Students may visit the Columbia College Web site at www.ccis.edu to access items noted above.)

The Financial Aid Office will process the loan data sheet. A Master Promissory Note is required for borrowers. The Financial Aid Office will request that the lending institution forward loan funds directly to the school. Funds will not be released until students are actually in attendance and financial liability is established.

A student must be enrolled at least half-time (1.5-2 semester hours) to be eligible for a Federal Stafford Loan. If a student withdraws or decides not to attend a term, loan proceeds will be canceled and returned to the lender.

If students have previous loans they should continue using the same lender. If they do not have previous loans, Columbia College uses primarily the following lenders: smartFUNDS, Boone County National Bank, Chase Manhattan Bank, Commerce Bank, US Bank, Bank One and Bank of America.

Students may receive a full loan amount only once per academic grade level. These levels are:

0-17.9 hours -- Grade 6
18-36 hours -- Grade 7

The loan maximums annually per grade level are as follows:

Stafford Subsidized and/or Unsubsidized -- $ 8,500
Additional Unsubsidized -- $10,000

STANDARDS OF ACADEMIC PROGRESS

According to United States Department of Education regulations and Missouri Coordinating Board for Higher Education policy, all students applying for federal and/or state financial assistance must maintain satisfactory progress in a degree program to retain funding. Satisfactory progress is measured in terms of qualitative, quantitative, and maximum time frame standards. Once a student receives financial aid, all course work in prior terms will count toward these standards.

Qualitative Measure

The quality of a students progress is measured by grade point average. The minimum cumulative grade point average for Financial Aid recipients is the same as the academic standard for Columbia College. Graduate Program students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 for courses within their degree program. Please refer to page 40 for additional information on satisfactory progress.

Quantitative Measure

The quantity of a students progress is measured by the Cumulative Completion Rate (hours earned divided by hours enrolled). The minimum Cumulative Completion Rate for Financial Aid recipients is 2/3. Special considerations are:
Repeated courses will not add total hours attempted or hours completed; the grade will simply be replaced. The new grade will be included in the GPA calculation, which will be considered when progress is again checked.

Total withdrawal from classes will count toward hours attempted for the Cumulative Completion Rate and students are subject to reinstatement and/or appeal procedures.

Maximum Time Frame Measure

Financial Aid recipients can remain eligible to receive federal and state aid for courses attempted up to the maximum allowable time frame of 150% of the hours required to complete the degree. All attempted, withdrawn, and/or transferred credits count toward this maximum time frame limit, regardless of changes in program, until a certificate or degree has been awarded. For example, a student pursuing a Masters degree requiring 36 semester hours may attempt up to 54 hours before Financial Aid eligibility is suspended (36 X 150% = 54).

Financial Aid Suspension and Probation

Failure to meet the minimum academic progress requirements will result in Financial Aid Probation or Suspension. The first time a student fails to meet the minimum requirement, he/she will be placed on financial aid probation. Probation is a warning in writing that subsequent failure to meet the minimum requirement will result in financial aid suspension. The second and subsequent time a student fails to meet the minimum requirement will result in loss of financial aid for the following term of enrollment. If placed on Financial Aid Suspension, notification will be sent to the student and all forms of Title IV federal and state aid will be withdrawn for the next session in which the student enrolls. The Financial Aid Office will review the academic progress of financial aid recipients twice per academic year: once in December and May. Please read the reinstatement and appeal policies that follow.

Reinstatement

Financial Aid can be reinstated when one of the following conditions has been met:
  1. The student completes courses in one or more sessions at Columbia College with a cumulative GPA at the required standard.
  2. The student files an appeal and the Campus Hearing Board approves the appeal (see appeal procedures below).

It is the students responsibility to notify the Financial Aid Office when reinstatement conditions have been met.

Appeal Procedure

Students who have been suspended from financial aid may make a written appeal for reinstatement of eligibility if extenuating circumstances have contributed to their inability to meet the requirements for satisfactory progress. Extenuating circumstances include, but are not limited to, the following:
  • Death of an immediate family member
  • Severe injury/illness of the student or an immediate family member
  • Emergency situations such as fire or flood
  • Legal separation from spouse or divorce
  • Military reassignment or required job transfers or shift changes

Students who do not meet the above criteria and/or cannot thoroughly document such situations, must reestablish eligibility through Reinstatement before any additional federal or state aid will be disbursed.

Students who do meet one of the above criteria may appeal using the following procedure:

  1. The student submits to the Director of Financial Aid a completed appeals packet. See below for instructions on completing the appeals packet.
  2. The complete appeal packet is presented to the Campus Hearing Board for review.
  3. The student is notified in writing of the Boards decision and recommendations.

The Appeal Packet

The student is responsible for completing an appeal packet containing the following:
  1. A Financial Aid Suspension Letter of Appeal (form can be obtained in the Financial Aid Office).
  2. Documentation to support extenuating circumstances.

Incomplete packets will not be considered.

Attendance

Financial aid is awarded to a student with the expectation that the student will attend school for the period for which the assistance is awarded. If a student does not begin attendance in all of his/her classes, the aid must be recalculated based on the actual attendance. Students who are not in attendance for the courses in which they are enrolled, are not eligible to receive financial aid.

Return of Title IV Funds

This policy applies to students who complete 60% or less of the enrollment period (i.e., Fall, Spring or Summer session) for which they received Federal Title IV aid. A student who drops a class but still completes one or more classes does not qualify for the Return of Title IV Funds policy. The term "Title IV aid" refers to the following Federal financial aid programs: Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans, Subsidized Federal Stafford loans, Federal Perkins loans, Federal PLUS (Parent) loans, Federal Pell Grants, and Federal SEOG (Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant).

To conform with the policy, Columbia College must determine the students withdrawal date. The withdrawal date is defined as the date the student began the withdrawal process or officially notified Columbia College of their intent to withdraw. For all other withdrawals without notification, the withdrawal date is the midpoint of the payment period of enrollment, as applicable.

The calculation required determines a students earned and unearned Title IV aid based on the percentage of the enrollment period completed by the student. The percentage of the period that the student remained enrolled is derived by dividing the number of days the student attended by the number of days in the period. Calendar days (including weekends) are used, but breaks of at least 5 days are excluded from both the numerator and denominator.

Until a student has passed the 60% point of an enrollment period, only a portion of the students aid has been earned. A student who remains enrolled beyond the 60% point is considered to have earned all awarded aid for the enrollment period.

Earned aid is not related in any way to institutional charges. In addition, the Colleges refund policy and Return of Title IV Funds procedures are independent of one another. A student who withdraws from a course may be required to return unearned aid and still owe the College for the course. For more information on the Columbia College withdrawal and institutional charges policies, please see the "Fees" section.

The responsibility to repay unearned Title IV aid is shared by Columbia College and the student. For example, the calculation may require Columbia College to return a portion of Federal funds to the Federal Title IV programs. In addition, the student may also be required to return funds based on the calculation. A student returns funds to the Federal Stafford loan programs based on the terms and conditions of the promissory note of the loan. Return of Federal aid is in the following order: Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans, Subsidized Federal Stafford loans, Federal Perkins loans and Federal PLUS (Parent) loans.

Students who owe funds to a grant program are required to make payment of those funds within 45 days of being notified that they owe this overpayment. During the 45 day period students will remain eligible for Title IV funds. If no positive action is taken by the student within 45 days of being notified, Columbia College will notify the U.S. Department of Education of the students overpayment situation. The student will no longer be eligible for Title IV funds until they enter into a satisfactory repayment agreement with the U.S. Department of Education.

During the 45-day period, the student can repay the College. The College will forward the payment to the U.S. Department of Education and the student will remain eligible for Title IV funds. Please make check payable to Columbia College, Attn: Director of Accounting. Please attach the remittance coupon to assure proper credit.

If unable to repay in full, the student can set up a repayment plan with the U.S. Department of Education. Before doing so, the student must contact the Columbia College Home Campus Financial Aid Office.

U.S. Department of Education
Student Financial Assistance Programs
P.O. Box 4222
Iowa City, IA 52245
Phone: 1-800-621-3115

CAMPUS LIFE

Food Services

Twenty meals per week are served in Dulany Hall. Food service begins with lunch on the day the residence halls open and ends with lunch on the last day of scheduled final examinations each semester. Resident students must purchase the meal plan.

Students who live in a residence hall must show their identification cards at the entrance to the dining hall before each meal. Students who live off campus may contract for board only, pay for meals individually or purchase discounted meal tickets. Tickets for guests may be purchased at the door.

A student Food Advisory Committee meets throughout the school year with dining hall personnel to promote the best possible food service operation.

Health Services

Health services are available to students, faculty and staff. The Health Center is a nurse practitioner-directed clinic that, along with a consulting physician, provides care for minor illnesses and injuries, health care counseling and community referral services. Visits to the clinic are free; however, payment for off campus labs, medicine and physician visits, when referred, is the clients responsibility. There may also be minimal charges for supplies and vaccines.

The Center promotes preventive health by offering flu vaccines, health screens and self-care guides concerning diverse health issues. The Health Center is located on the first floor of Robnett-Spence.

Recreation

The student center, recreation and events center, tennis court, softball field, common areas, and residence hall lounges are available for a variety of recreational activities. The Fitness Center is located in Southy Hall. The Southwell Complex Gymnasium is open daily. Other college facilities, such as Launer Auditorium, the Jane Froman Studio, classrooms, Dulany Hall, and the Student Center are available upon approval to any officially recognized student organization for meetings and programs. Reservations are made on a first-come, first-served basis. More information is available in the Student Activities Office.

Recreational areas within the immediate region include Cosmo Park, Peace Park, Pinnacles Park, Arrow Rock, and Rock Bridge State Park. The Lake of the Ozarks, a major tourist area, is sixty miles south of Columbia. St. Louis and Kansas City are each 125 miles from Columbia on Interstate 70.

Wellness Center

The Wellness Center serves as a campus resource for all students, faculty and staff. It promotes healthy lifestyle choices and encourages balance among mind, body and spirit. Throughout the year it sponsors workshops and seminars that focus on personal development, wellness, diversity and leadership. The Wellness Center also offers classes in various outdoor recreation areas, as well as peer advising opportunities. It is a wonderful place to socialize between classes or to get away from the noise and find a quiet spot to relax. The Center houses a small library focusing on wellness and other health related topics.

Counseling Services

Professional, confidential counseling is available throughout the school year to students, faculty and staff. Students may meet individually with a counselor or participate in small group experiences. Counseling services can address various issues including stress management, anxiety, depression, relationships and drug and alcohol abuse.

Religious Affairs

Opportunities abound in Columbia for religious expression, cultural appreciation, spiritual exploration and faith development. The Columbia College Chapel is open to all students, faculty, and staff for prayer and meditation. Programs on campus include spiritual events, studies of religious issues and opportunities for discussion with others through affiliated clubs and organizations. Information is available in the Wellness Center and Student Activities Office.

Columbia College respects the right of all persons to practice their faith according to the recognized tenets of their religion. Should religious observance require absence from regularly scheduled activities, individuals are responsible for notifying supervisors/instructors prior to the absence and making appropriate arrangements.

Career Services Center

The center has trained personnel to assist students with all aspects of career planning and development. Specific services designed to encourage, enhance, and promote professional and personal success include a carefully guided assessment of skills, abilities, values, achievements, and interests as aids to effective career planning; a library of information about occupations, corporations, agencies, and government organizations; salary surveys; employment qualifications and employment trends; development and maintenance of placement documents; listings of full-time, part-time, and summer employment opportunities and internships; and services for graduate and pre-professional school placement. Programs are provided to inform and train the individual in such areas as interviewing, resume/cover-letter construction, job hunting and sourcing, networking, decision making, and salary negotiation.

Student Handbook

Every fall a new edition of the Student Handbook is published providing detailed information about all aspects of campus life. Copies are available at Registration and in the Campus Life Office.

Bookstore

The College bookstore carries a range of textbooks, trade books, art supplies, study materials, college memorabilia, personal grooming products, and snacks. Both new and used textbooks are available. (The Bookstore is open during evening hours at the beginning of each evening session.)

Students may receive textbook refunds based on the policies listed below. No refund will be issued without a valid receipt for all textbooks. Textbooks must be in the original condition:

Day:
  • A full refund will be given during the first week of class.
  • After the first week, a full refund will be given up to 30 days after start of classes, if within two business days of purchase or with proof of course schedule change.
  • All other textbook refunds within the first 30 days will be honored at 75% of the purchase price.
Evening and Summer Classes:
  • Refunds for summer and eight-week Evening courses will be accepted for only one week after the start of class.
Day and Evening Classes:
  • Merchandise other than textbooks may be refunded anytime with a valid receipt. Exceptions include custom course materials, outlines, study guides, magazines and prepaid phone cards. Software must be unopened for exchange or refund. Open software may be exchanged for the identical item only.

Refunds will be issued in the original form of payment.

Students with Disabilities

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (public law 93-112) section 504, provides that "no otherwise qualified disabled individual in the United States shall solely by reason of his/her disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance."

  1. It is the students responsibility to notify the institution of a disability that would require academic adjustments in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in section 504. To self-identify as a student with a disability, the student must register with the ADA Coordinator two weeks in advance of the date accommodations are needed. Although students are encouraged to discuss their needs with their instructors, registration with the ADA Coordinator is necessary in order to receive reasonable accommodation. All disabilities must be appropriately documented.
  2. While students are encouraged to self-identify at the earliest possible time, students may not know or choose to self-identify, but may still receive services at any time once they self-disclose and provide documentation.
  3. Students with disabilities have the right to have access and accommodation complaints addressed through a formal appeals procedure. Students wishing to file a grievance must complete the Disabilities Grievance Form in its entirety, attach a description of the circumstances leading to the complaint as directed on the Disabilities Grievance Form, and submit both documents to the Campus Life Office. Disabilities Grievance Forms are available in the Campus Life Office, the Academic Affairs Office, the ADA Coordinators Office, and the Plant and Facilities Operations Office.

Parking Permits

All cars and motorcycles parked on campus must be registered with the Security Office. Parking permits are valid for an academic year, beginning in August. Cost is prorated: purchased fall semester, $30; purchased spring semester, $25; purchased for summer terms, $20. This fee is non-refundable.

One-day guest parking passes may be obtained from the Security Office, Plant and Facilities Operations Office or the residence hall offices.


ACADEMIC POLICIES, REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

Graduate students enroll for course work prior to the beginning of each session. Post Baccalaureate students are allowed to register for undergraduate courses during the registration period for seniors. Late registrations are accepted through the add period for each session. The late registration fee begins on the first day of graduate classes. Five eight-week sessions are offered each year beginning in January, March, June, August and October.

Students who are fully admitted to a graduate program obtain registration forms in the Registration Office. Registration by fax is available as well. Please contact the Registration Office to obtain the required forms. Students not fully admitted to a graduate program (Student-At-Large, Alternative Certification, Post Baccalaureate, Non-Degree Seeking, or admitted with conditions) obtain registration forms in the Admissions office.

Students who are fully admitted to a graduate degree program or with written permission from the respective graduate department may be eligible to enroll in undergraduate and graduate courses for which they have met the prerequisites. Students may enroll in undergraduate and graduate courses within the same session or semester.

Advising

Students are encouraged to meet regularly with the appropriate Graduate Program Director who serves as their advisor. The importance of the advisor/advisee relationship cannot be overemphasized. Both personal and academic concerns should be addressed at these meetings.

Course Load

Students may take one or more classes each session. Students taking fewer than three graduate semester hours (six undergraduate semester hours) per session are classified as part-time students. Students who desire to enroll in more than six graduate hours per session must obtain the permission of the appropriate Graduate Program Director by written petition.

3 Semester HoursFull-time
1.5 - 2 Semester HoursHalf-time
below 1.5 Semester HoursLess than Half-time

Students desiring to take a course from a department outside the one to which they were admitted must obtain permission from the Chair of the Department for that course.

Adding a Course

Graduate students may add courses through the first five days of the session (by 5:00 p.m.). Forms are available in the Registration Office. Courses are added to the students schedules if space is available.

Dropping a Course

Graduate students may drop courses without academic record and financial liability through the first five days of the session (by 5:00 p.m.). Drop forms are available in the Registration Office.

Withdrawal from Courses

Students who withdraw from courses between the end of the drop period and the end of the sixth week of classes for eight-week classes receive a Withdrawn (W). Students do not receive grade points for withdrawn grades, but the notation appears on the transcripts.

Course withdrawal forms, which explain attendant conditions, are available in the Registration Office. If students do not complete the withdrawal process, a grade of F is recorded on their record unless they remain in the courses and complete them satisfactorily.

Graduate Grading System

Columbia College records letter grades for course work. Grades for graduate courses include:
A - Outstanding performance
B - Average performance
C - Less than acceptable performance
F - Significant performance failure with no academic credit or quality points awarded

Other grades include

WWithdrawn. Awarded when a student officially withdraws from a course, or when an instructor withdraws a student from a course. Students may not withdraw from a course after the sixth week has been completed.
WEExcused from the course for extraordinary circumstances. Generally, "extraordinary circumstances" is narrowly interpreted to mean the development of unforeseen, unexpected circumstances beyond a students ability to control that prevent continued attendance in all classes (death of an immediate family member, a change in the students employment, and mental or physical illness befalling the student or a member of his/her immediate family).

A request for a grade of WE must be accompanied by a letter from the student explaining the circumstances. In addition, substantiating documentation must be provided. A grade of WE may be requested anytime during the term of enrollment, and all courses currently enrolled in must be included in the WE request.

A grade of WE is not automatic and is subject to review and approval.

SAwarded to a student showing satisfactory progress on culminating experience.
IAssignment of an Incomplete is reserved for extraordinary circumstances that prevent a student from completing the requirements of a course by the end of the session. Extraordinary circumstances is narrowly interpreted to mean unforeseen, unexpected circumstances beyond the students control that prevents continued attendance in all classes (death of an immediate family member, a change in the students employment, mental or physical illness befalling the student or a member of the immediate family). In such cases instructors make specific written arrangements with students for completion of the course.

If a student receives an Incomplete, he/she must complete required course work by the end of the following eight-week session. Extensions beyond one session must be approved by the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs. Incompletes that are not finished are to be permanently recorded by the instructor as I or any other grade assigned by the instructor.

When incomplete work in a course is completed, the instructor is responsible for reporting the letter grade that replaces the I on the students permanent record.

Students enrolled in EDUC 500 Research Design are exempt from this policy.

Graduate credit is awarded only for courses designated as graduate courses and the graduate grade point average is computed based on those courses. Undergraduate credit is given only for courses designated as undergraduate courses. A grade of B or higher is expected in all graduate and undergraduate course work. Refer to page 39 for information on Satisfactory Academic Progress.

Repeating a Course

Courses may be repeated at Columbia College in an attempt to improve grades. The grade earned the second time the course is taken is used to determine the grade-point average, and the first grade is identified as R (Repeat) on the transcript. The first grade does not figure in the total hours or the grade-point average. In all cases, the second grade is the one that is recorded. No duplicate credit is given.

Audit

Students wishing to audit graduate courses must be properly admitted to the Graduate Program and complete the Audit Approval Request Form.

Students may audit a regularly scheduled class for no grade and no credit; however, participation in the course is noted on their official records. Acceptable performance and attendance is defined by all instructors of the course. Audit enrollments do not fulfill requirements for course work for degree completion or financial aid awards. Admittance to class is based on space availability and registration begins at the same time as for Non-Degree students. The cost to audit is $90 per semester hour.

Transfer of Credits From Another Institution or Columbia College Degree Program

Students must submit official transcripts from each college or university attended when applying for full admission to graduate programs at Columbia College.

An official transcript is one that is sent directly from the institution attended to Columbia College and bears an embossed seal of the institution and the signature of the Registrar. Students are required to identify all post-secondary institutions attended. Failure to do so may result in dismissal.

Upon petition by the student to the appropriate Department Chair, credit may be given for graduate hours taken at another institution or another Columbia College degree program within the last seven years. Petitions must include an official course description from the transferring college catalog and/or course syllabus to be considered. Credit may be transferred from regionally accredited institutions only. Petitions for consideration of transfer credit must be made prior to the successful completion of 12 hours of graduate course work at Columbia College. A maximum of 9 semester hours of transfer credit, with the grade of B or higher, may be allowed for graduate students. In all instances, the culminating experience must be taken at Columbia College.

A student at Columbia College who wishes to take courses at another college or university while pursuing a graduate degree at Columbia College must first obtain written permission for the transfer of these courses from the appropriate Department Chair.

Change in Degree Program

A student wishing to pursue a graduate degree or program other than the one originally sought should contact the Director of Admissions to determine whether additional materials need to be submitted.

Second Degrees

A student who desires a second masters degree from Columbia College may receive a maximum of 9 hours credit from the first degree toward the second degree, if the credit is deemed applicable by the academic department in which the second degree is sought. All other requirements for the second degree, including the culminating experience, must be completed.

Candidacy for Degree

Declaration of candidacy for a degree must occur no later than one session prior to the last session of enrollment for degree completion. Candidacy forms are to be filed in the Evaluations Office after payment of the graduation processing fee at the cashiers window. Before advancement to candidacy can be approved, students must present evidence that the completion of all College and Department requirements, including all course work with the required grade point average, will be met.

Students Right to Privacy

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include:
  1. The right to inspect and review their education record within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access. Students should submit to the Registrar or Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The student will be notified of a time and place where the records may be inspected.
  2. The right to request the amendment of that part of a students education record that the student believes is inaccurate or misleading. The student should write to the Registrar, clearly identify the part of the record he/she wants changed and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If Columbia College decides not to amend the record as requested, the College will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the students education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is defined as a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or support staff position (including law enforcement unit and health staff); a person or company with whom the College has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the College discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:
    Family Compliance Office
    U.S. Department of Education
    400 Maryland Avenue, SW
    Washington, DC 20202-4605

Release of Directory Information - Under the provisions of the Act, Columbia College is allowed to disclose "Directory Information" without consent. "Directory Information" is described as name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, dates of attendance, class, previous institutions attended, major field of study, awards, honors (including deans list), degree(s) conferred (including dates), past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height and weight of athletes), and date and place of birth. "Directory Information" is released at the discretion of the institution. However, students who do not wish any or all of this information to be released may prevent such release by completing and signing a Request to Prevent Disclosure of Directory Information available in the Registration Office. Also available in the Registration Office are forms a student may complete granting access of non-directory information (such as students account or grades) to parents or other individuals.

Transcripts

Columbia College transcripts of permanent student records are confidential and cannot be released to anyone, except Columbia College instructors and officials, without the written permission from the student. Columbia College accepts transcript requests via mail, fax or in person. All requests must include the signature of the student whose record is being released. Requests will not be accepted via e-mail even if an electronic signature is included. Payment may be made by cash, check, money order or credit card. The transcript fee is $7.50 per transcript.

Requests must include the students full name, maiden or former name if applicable, dates of attendance, ID or SS number, birth date, the students current address and phone number, the address where the transcript should be sent, the number of copies to be issued and the payment.

If payment is to be made via credit card, the card number, expiration date and a daytime phone number by which the student may be contacted must be included. A students current account balance must be clear prior to the release of the transcript.

Satisfactory Progress

Students are expected to make satisfactory academic progress toward completing their degree programs. The determination of satisfactory progress relies on quantitative, incremental, and qualitative measures; in general the following standards determine satisfactory progress:
  1. Students receive nine semester hours of graduate credit within one academic year. Students must be enrolled and attend classes to receive earned credit. Courses with the grade of Incomplete (I) may be applied toward the earned credit requirement. Courses being repeated do not fulfill this requirement.
  2. Students must complete the graduate degree program within a seven-year period.
  3. Students achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better.

Unsatisfactory Progress

Students academic standing may be jeopardized by one or more of the following:
  1. Receipt of a C in any course.
  2. Receipt of two or more Incomplete grades within any one session.
  3. Violation of academic honesty or professional or ethical conduct.

Attendance and Lack-of-Effort Policies

Students are expected to attend all classes and laboratory periods for which they are enrolled. The instructor, not the College, defines conditions under which an absence is excused. The instructor is responsible for the maintenance of standards and quality of work in his or her classes. An absence is an individual matter between student and instructor.

Students are directly responsible to instructors for class attendance and for work missed during an absence for any cause. An instructor may drop a student from a course, and any drop initiated during the semester or session by an instructor for a students lack of attendance or lack of effort is recorded on the students permanent record as a grade of F or W at the discretion of the instructor.

Probation

Students whose cumulative grade point average falls below the 3.0 minimum for courses within their degree program will be placed on probation. Students placed on probation must earn sufficient grade points, within their degree program, during their probationary term, to raise their cumulative grade point average to 3.0 within the next 9 semester hours. Failure to do so will result in dismissal.

Students on probation are generally not eligible for financial aid. Appeals for financial aid consideration should be submitted to the Director of Financial Aid for review by the Campus Hearing Board of the College.

Dismissal

Students will be dismissed from the graduate program for any of the following:
  1. Receipt of a grade of C in two or more graduate courses.
  2. Receipt of a grade of F in any one graduate course.
  3. Failure to remove themselves from probation as described above.
  4. Recommendation of the academic department, based on proven academic dishonesty, or ethical or professional misconduct.

Students who are dismissed will not be readmitted to Columbia College graduate programs. Students having extenuating circumstances may appeal the academic dismissal to the Graduate Council. Appeals should be directed to the Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies within one session after dismissal. Students will be informed by the Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies, in writing, of the action taken.

Grievance and Appeals

Students may file appeals when they believe that an incorrect or unfair grade has been awarded. Documentation which demonstrates compelling objective evidence is required in all grade appeals.

In general, students should follow this procedure for grade appeals:

  1. Discuss the problem with the faculty member involved.
  2. If not satisfied with that faculty members explanation, seek mediation from the Department Chair.
  3. Failing resolution of the problem, request a grade appeal hearing with the Hearing Board. This request must be filed in writing with the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs within 60 calendar days after grades have been issued by the Registration Office. The Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs may inform students that their submitted materials do not support requests for changes in grades and/or forward the appeals to the Hearing Board. The decision of the Hearing Board is final. The chair of the Hearing Board communicates decisions to the student and other parties involved in the appeal. If a change in grade or academic standing results, the chair of the Hearing Board notifies the Registrar of the new grade or change in standing.
  4. In the event that new evidence becomes available, a request may be made in writing to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs, who determines if the appeal is to be reconsidered. If a question arises regarding procedural correctness or impartiality, the issue may be brought to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs, who has the final authority in passing judgment on these matters.

Student Conduct

The College has adopted a Student Conduct Code to protect the rights of students, faculty, staff and the College itself. This code ensures that the Columbia College learning community is one characterized by mutual respect, civility and good citizenship.

Columbia College students, as members of the academic community, are expected to accept and adhere to these high standards of personal conduct. Students shall:

  1. Treat all members of the College community with courtesy, respect and dignity.
  2. Comply with directions of College officials acting in the performance of their duties.
  3. Treat the campus itself with respect, including buildings, grounds and furnishings.
  4. Respect the rights and property of other members of the College community.
  5. Fulfill their obligations through honest and independent effort and integrity in academic and personal conduct.
  6. Accept responsibility for and the consequences of their actions and shall encourage responsible conduct in others.
  7. Respect the prohibition of possession, consumption, distribution and provision of alcohol on campus and the illegal possession, use, distribution and provision of controlled substances.
  8. Abide by all published policies including, but not limited to those that appear in the College Catalog, Student Handbook, Residential Life Handbook and Code for Computer Users.
  9. Refrain from any contact with firearms on campus and from tampering with fire safety equipment in College buildings.
  10. Have no firearms, weapons or any other item designed to inflict harm or damage on campus.

The Student Conduct Code, as well as the preceding guidelines outlining the adjudication of conduct-related offenses, applies to all Columbia College students.

Academic Integrity

The College expects students to fulfill their academic obligations through honest and independent effort. In a community of scholars committed to truth, dishonesty violates the code of ethics by which we live and is considered a serious offense subject to strong disciplinary actions. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to the following:
  • Knowingly furnishing false or misleading information.
  • Falsification, alteration or misuse of College forms or records.
  • Any joint effort in examinations, assignments or other academic activity unless authorized by the instructor.
  • Plagiarism in any form; using anothers phrase, sentence or paragraph without quotation marks; using anothers ideas or structure without properly identifying the source; or using the work of someone else and submitting it as ones own.
  • Willfully aiding another in any act of academic dishonesty. Columbia College is equally concerned about the interpersonal social relationships that affect the learning environment. Respect for the conditions necessary to enhance learning is, therefore, required.

Procedures:

Generally, the faculty will handle offenses related to academic misconduct and assign appropriate penalties without involving others. In such cases, the following procedures will be followed:
  1. The faculty member who, upon investigation, suspects academic misconduct will, if possible, confer with the student suspected.
    1. If the faculty member determines the student is not responsible for engaging in academic misconduct, the matter will be dropped.
    2. If the faculty member determines the unacceptable behavior was unintentional, the violation will be explained and an alternative penalty will be imposed at the discretion of the investigating faculty member. The Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs and the Dean for Campus Life must be notified in writing of the incident and the outcome.
    3. If the student admits responsibility for academic misconduct, or if the faculty member determines there was intentional unacceptable behavior, the faculty member may impose the penalty stated in the course syllabus. In the absence of a penalty stated in the course syllabus, the penalty will be a grade of F on that activity, which will be factored into the final grade. The Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs and the Dean for Campus Life must be notified in writing of the incident and the action taken.
  2. A student wishing to challenge or appeal the accusation of academic misconduct should seek the counsel of the Department Chair. The Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs must be notified of the results of this informal disposition.
  3. If either the student or the faculty member is not satisfied with the informal disposition, he/she may request a formal hearing. The individual must initiate the hearing procedure by filing an Appeal Request Form with the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs within one (1) school day after the informal disposition meeting. The written request will be forwarded to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs and the Dean for Campus Life.
  4. The Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs and the Dean for Campus Life will review the request and determine if there are proper grounds for appeal and whether the evidence submitted warrants reconsideration of the decisions. All parties involved will be notified. Generally, most incidents of academic dishonesty, such as plagiarism, cheating and grade appeals, will be resolved through processes governed by Academic Affairs. Most incidents of personal conduct related allegations, such as disorderly classroom conduct, will be resolved through processes governed by Campus Life.

It is important to note that there are those cases where the allegations and potential consequences are so serious and complex that the matter will be submitted, at the outset, to Campus Life for investigation, informal disposition, and if necessary, formal disposition through a campus hearing board. Decisions regarding case jurisdiction ultimately rest with the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs and the Dean for Campus Life.

Class Conduct:

Students are expected to conduct themselves on campus and in class so others are not distracted from the pursuit of learning. Discourteous or unseemly conduct may result in a student being asked to leave the classroom. Persistent misconduct on the part of a student is subject to disciplinary action as outlined in the Student Handbook and in the course syllabus. Some examples of classroom misconduct that will not be tolerated include, but are not limited to the following:
  • Disorderly conduct
  • Harassment
  • Verbal abuse
  • Assault
  • Interference with the educational opportunity of other students
  • Attending class under the influence of alcohol or other drugs

Personal Conduct:

Students may be disciplined for conduct, which constitutes a hazard to the health, safety, or well-being of members of the College community or which is deemed detrimental to the interests of the College. These sanctions apply whether or not such conduct occurs on campus, off campus, at College-sponsored or non-College-sponsored events. Disciplinary action may be taken regardless of the existence of any criminal proceedings that may be pending.

Procedures:

Generally, allegations regarding a students personal conduct will be adjudicated through processes governed by the Campus Life Department.
  1. The Assistant Dean for Campus Life or another appropriate College official will investigate the situation and review it with the student. If it is determined that no violation occurred, then the matter will be dropped. If the student admits responsibility or the Assistant Dean for Campus Life determines there was a violation, College disciplinary action will ensue. The student will be notified in writing of the finding of fact and the recommended disciplinary sanction recommended by the Assistant Dean for Campus Life.
  2. If facing disciplinary action, the student has the right to accept the Assistant Deans finding of fact and recommended sanction, at which time the matter is closed; or the student may appeal to the Dean for Campus Life for a review of the finding of fact and/or the recommended sanction.
  3. To initiate an appeal, the student must file an Appeal Request Form with the Dean for Campus Life within one (1) school day of the informal disposition meeting with the Assistant Dean for Campus Life. The Dean for Campus Life will review the request and determine if there are sufficient grounds for appeal and if evidence submitted warrants reconsideration of the decision. All parties will be notified.
  4. If a decision is made to reconsider, a campus hearing board will be empanelled to hear the matter. Decisions made by the Campus Hearing Board are final.

Student Conduct for Evening Campus, ESD and Distance Education:

Directors for the Evening Campus, Extended Studies Division and Distance Education will be responsible for disposition of less serious conduct-related offenses. For more serious offenses, disposition will be handled by the Campus Life Department.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES

Library

The J.W. and Lois Stafford Library is housed in a facility built in 1989, with a light and open atmosphere offering an environment conducive to learning that will help students throughout their college careers. The library is open more than 80 hours per week and staff members are available to provide reference help to students at all times. Library instruction is provided on an individual basis as well as to classes.

The librarys collection of materials supports the curriculum of Columbia College with over 80,000 items (books, CDs, videos, etc.) and more than six hundred periodical, magazine and newspaper titles in paper and on microfilm. Copy machines are provided for student use.

The librarys computer workstations provide quick access to a variety of databases and the Internet. Stafford Library subscribes to several on-line periodical databases with full text of most articles from professional journals, legal publications, newspapers and magazines. Patrons are able to access these resources from off campus as well as from the library workstations. The library classroom is equipped with listening stations and a computer with data projector that is used for library instruction as well as for other courses on campus.

In addition, Stafford Library is a member of MOBIUS Consortium, also known as Missouri Bibliographic Information User System. This membership allows patrons access to millions of books in more than fifty academic libraries across the state of Missouri. The consortium libraries include three in Columbia, MO. Students can find and request books using a union catalog or they can visit participating libraries. Extended Studies Division students can use MOBIUS libraries in their areas.

Technology Services Center

The Technology Services Center offers to individual students access to computers, network, and software technology. Software included in the curriculum is available for use on center computers. The Technology Services Center also is the home of the computer Helpdesk operation. The Helpdesk is available to assist students using networking services in residence halls and to provide assistance in basic computer use.

The Technology Services Center, located in Buchanan Hall, is open seven days a week. Please contact the Center for current hours of operation.

E-Mail and Internet Access

A section of the Technology Services Center is devoted to providing students with access to electronic mail (e-mail) and the Internet. E-mail accounts are available, without additional charge, to all students enrolled in the College. E-mail accounts may be accessed, with proper software, from on or off campus. Internet access is available to students for use as a resource in researching study topics.

Computer Classrooms

The Technology Services Center maintains two classrooms for instructional use. Classes using computing resources, such as English, Computer Programming and Accounting, are conducted in these facilities. Students are able to complete assignments outside of class using computer resources in the Technology Services Walk-In Lab.

Walk-In Lab Use

The Technology Services Center maintains an area equipped with computers and a high-capacity printer for student use on a walk-in basis. Software used in classroom instruction is available to students for use in completing assignments. E-mail and the Internet are also accessible.

Technology Services Computer Lab Hours:

Monday-Thursday 8:00 a.m.-12:00 a.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
Saturday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Sunday 12:00 p.m.-12:00 a.m.

Language Lab

The Columbia College Language Lab offers computerized instruction to aid students studying Spanish and English as a second or other language (ESOL). Software is available for the computer specially housed in the Technology Services Center. This computer is in its own sound proof booth, as listening skills are an important focus of language acquisition. Both the Spanish program and the ESOL program accompany texts used at the College. This facility is open to students concurrent with walk-in lab availability.

COLUMBIA COLLEGE ETHICS CODE FOR COMPUTER USERS

Computer Facilities operated by Columbia College are available for the use of students, faculty and staff. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to use these facilities for research and instruction. In order to make it possible for everyone to have access to computing resources on campus it is necessary to establish fair-use guidelines. Use of Columbia College computer facilities is a privilege and all users are expected to adhere to the following ethical guidelines when using Columbia College computing resources.

General Principles

  1. Respect for intellectual labor and creativity is vital to academic discourse and enterprise. This principle applies to works of all authors and publishers in all media. It encompasses respect for the right to acknowledgment, right to privacy, and right to determine the form, manner and terms of publication and distribution.
  2. Because electronic information is so volatile and easily reproduced, respect for the work and personal expression of others is especially critical in computer environments. Violations of author integrity, including plagiarism, invasion of privacy, unauthorized access, and trade secrets and copyright violations, may be grounds for sanctions against members of the academic community.

    Columbia College endorses this statement of software and intellectual rights developed by EDUCOM, a non-profit consortium of colleges and universities committed to the use and management of information technology in higher education.

Ethical and Responsible Use of Computers

  1. The College provides computing equipment and facilities to students, staff and faculty for purposes of work (business), instruction and research. It is a violation of College policy to use College computers for commercial purposes.
  2. When working in College Computing Labs users will be aware of and follow rules posted for fair use.
  3. Use of College Computing resources for academic objectives takes precedence over use of those facilities for personal reasons.
  4. Computer communications systems and networks promote the free exchange of ideas and information, thus enhancing teaching and research, as well as enabling employees to work more efficiently and productively. Computer users must not use electronic communications systems of any kind to send material that is obscene, illegal, discriminating, or intended to defame or harass others, or to interfere with their work on the computer.
  5. Students, faculty and staff who use the computers have the right to security of their computer programs and data. Computer users must not access files or information that belong to other users or to the operating system without permission. Employees, students and anyone associated with Columbia College should note that electronic communication (media) and services provided by Columbia College are the property of such and their purpose is to facilitate business, teaching and research.
  6. United States copyright and patent laws protect the interests of authors, inventors and software developers in their products. Software license agreements serve to increase compliance with copyright and patent laws, and to help insure publishers, authors and developers of return on their investments. It is against federal law and College policy to violate the copyrights or patents of computer software. It is against College policy and may be a violation of state or federal law to violate software license agreements. Students, faculty or staff may not use programs obtained from commercial sources or other computer installations unless written authority to use them has been obtained or the programs are within the public domain.
  7. Security systems for computers exist to ensure that only authorized users have access to computer resources. All passwords are confidential and should not be given out for others to use. The College prohibits the use of another persons password or identity to access confidential information and files. Computer users must not attempt to modify system facilities or attempt to crash the system, nor should they attempt to subvert the restrictions associated with their computer accounts, the networks of which the College is a member, or microcomputer software protections.
  8. Abusers of computing privileges will be subject to disciplinary action. Violators will be subject to Columbia Colleges disciplinary procedures as detailed in the appropriate handbook/bulletin, up to and including termination or expulsion. The computer systems administrator reserves the right to examine users computer files and messages to resolve complaints and/or grievances to ensure reliable system operation.
  9. Abuse of the networks, or of computers at other campuses connected to the networks, or of personnel who assist in the labs will be treated as abuse of computing privileges at Columbia College.
  10. Computer users shall cooperate in any investigation of violation of responsible use.
  11. Damage to or destruction of any Columbia College computer or computer equipment will subject the offender to disciplinary action up to and including termination or expulsion and financial reimbursement to the College.

Examples

The following are examples of ethical or responsible uses of computers:
  • Using electronic mail to correspond with colleagues at other colleges or universities.
  • Sharing diskettes of files of programs or data with team members working together on a research project.
  • Copying software placed in public domain.
  • Using computing equipment for grant supported research with approval from the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs.
  • Reporting nonfunctional computing equipment to lab assistants or technical services repair staff, or Residential Life staff for residence hall equipment.
The following are examples of unethical or irresponsible uses of computing resources:
  • Using computer facilities for work done on behalf of a commercial firm.
  • Sending or showing electronic files, such as mail messages or images, containing material offensive to others who may see the file.
  • Copying a file from another computer users account or floppy disk without permission.
  • Copying copyrighted computer software to use on another computer.
  • Unplugging or reconfiguring computer equipment to make it unusable or difficult to use.
  • Installing software on College computers without permission of supervisor.
  • Downloading materials from the Internet or World Wide Web and submitting them for credit as ones own work.
  • Downloading or displaying obscene images or messages.

Student E-Mail Policy (Use of E-Mail for Official Correspondence with Students)

  1. College use of e-mail
    E-mail is a mechanism for official communication within Columbia College. The College has the right to expect that such communications will be received and read in a timely fashion. Official e-mail communications are intended to meet only the academic and administrative needs of the campus community. As steward of this process, the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs is responsible for directing the use of the official student e-mail system.
  2. Assignment of student e-mail
    Official College e-mail accounts are available for all enrolled students. The addresses are all of the form [Name]@cougars.ccis.edu. These accounts must be activated before the College can correspond with its students using the official e-mail system. Official e-mail addresses will be maintained in the Datatel Student Information System and will be considered directory information unless students request otherwise.
  3. Redirecting of e-mail
    If a student wishes to have e-mail redirected from their official @cougars.ccis.edu address to another e-mail address (e.g., @aol.com, @hotmail.com, or an address on a departmental server), they may do so, but at their own risk. The College will not be responsible for the handling of e-mail by outside vendors or by departmental servers. Having e-mail redirected does not absolve a student from the responsibilities associated with official communications sent to his or her @cougars.ccis.edu account.
  4. Expectations about student use of e-mail
    Students are expected to check their e-mail on a frequent and consistent basis in order to stay current with College-related communications. Students have the responsibility to recognize that certain communications may be time-critical. "I didnt check my e-mail", error in forwarding mail, or e-mail returned to the College with "Mailbox Full" or "User Unknown" are not acceptable reasons for missing official College communications via e-mail.
  5. Authentication for confidential information
    It is a violation of Columbia College policies, including the Student Code of Conduct, for any user of official e-mail addresses to impersonate a College office, faculty/staff member, or student, or to use the College e-mail to violate the Student Code of Conduct.
  6. Privacy
    Users should exercise extreme caution in using e-mail to communicate confidential or sensitive matters, and should not assume that e-mail is private and confidential. It is especially important that users are careful to send messages only to the intended recipient(s). Particular care should be taken when using the "reply" command during e-mail correspondence.
  7. Educational uses of e-mail
    Faculty will determine how electronic forms of communication (e.g., e-mail) will be used in their classes and will specify their requirements in the course syllabus. This "Official Student E-mail Policy" will ensure that all students will be able to comply with e-mail-based course requirements specified by faculty. Faculty can therefore make the assumption that students official @cougars.ccis.edu accounts are being accessed and faculty can use e-mail for classes accordingly.
  8. E-mail Account Activation
    Students will receive an e-mail account at the time they register for classes. Individuals will sign an acceptance form which will include the Colleges Code of Conduct. Returning students will not have to reactivate their account, as long as they have not missed three consecutive terms. Upon graduation, a student may elect to have his e-mail account moved to the Alumni e-mail account, or deactivated.
  9. Deactivation of account
    Non-attendance for three consecutive terms will constitute reason for revoking the account and the deletion of data pertaining to it. Hardship cases will be handled by the Office for Academic Affairs on a case-by-case basis.
  10. Computer Locations
    Computers are located in the Computer Lab in Buchanan Hall, Stafford Library, and residence hall computer labs for student use in accessing e-mail accounts.

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING

Education Department Chair: Becky Widener, Ed.D.
MAT Graduate Program Director: Becky Widener, Ed.D.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

For our Master of Arts in Teaching Program, Columbia College and the Education Faculty have endorsed national certification of teachers, and have adopted the core proposals of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards as goals of the program. When conducting best practice, teachers:
  1. Are committed to students and their learning;
  2. Know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to students;
  3. Are responsible for managing and monitoring student learning;
  4. Think systematically about their practice and learn from experience; and
  5. Are members of learning communities.

To help students reach these goals, Columbia College believes that truly effective teaching must be modeled, not just taught. Therefore, faculty are encouraged to engage students in active learning, research in field situations, problem solving, interactive dialogs and questioning, and constant exploration of what is and what could be. Students are supported in their efforts: to identify and evaluate relevant issues as they relate to various aspects of teaching and learning; to engage in critical and creative thinking with colleagues, peers, and professors; to develop as whole persons, valuing individualism, uniqueness and diversity of others; to consistently use reflection and research as the foundation for decision making; and, to value and promote professionalism and a commitment to learning which is never ending.

All MAT students who are public school teachers are encouraged to use their program of study as a springboard to obtaining national certification. The Education Faculty of Columbia College are dedicated to helping their students to do so by helping them develop competencies which promote active research and the development of new knowledge, as well as the synthesis and application of existing knowledge. It is expected that students who graduate from the program will have had experiences that enable them to:

  1. Read critically in the areas of curriculum, instruction, psychology, philosophy, assessment, and research;
  2. Analyze and evaluate educational issues from both theoretical and applied perspectives;
  3. Communicate conclusions in accepted written and verbal formats;
  4. Design and defend both curricula supported by a strong theoretical base and assessment procedures established to measure effectiveness of the curricula;
  5. Design instruction based on a knowledge of learning theory, human growth and development, and individual differences;
  6. Understand, analyze, interpret, evaluate, and apply research in appropriate educational settings;
  7. Design, implement, and assess research projects in educational settings;
  8. Identify and discuss human diversity issues as they are manifested in individual differences, cultural pluralism, and global issues, and adapt curriculum and instruction based on that knowledge; and
  9. Evaluate personal effectiveness and articulate a commitment to professional growth and development.

Emphasis Areas

Courses are grouped into three areas: curriculum and instruction, psychological and philosophical foundations, and measurement and evaluation. Students may elect to structure an academic emphasis by taking 12 hours from one area.

For students training to be community college instructors, or teachers wanting to focus on the subjects they teach, an academic content area emphasis (21 hours) may be available.

Endorsements

Mild/Moderate Cross Categorical Special Education, Gifted Education, and Reading Specialist endorsements are available to students who are certified teachers. Students wishing to pursue an endorsement need to work closely with their academic advisors to fulfill endorsement requirements.

Tuition Reimbursement

Pending state funding, tuition reimbursement may be available from the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education for paraprofessionals and contracted certified teachers who qualify and take courses in the area of Mild/Moderate Cross Categorical Special Education. Additional information is available from the MAT Program Director.

Focused Academic Sequence: Baccalaureate or Graduate

A Focused Academic Sequence (FAS) can be developed and implemented to quickly and effectively respond to a students specific needs. Any student may request an FAS to meet any baccalaureate or graduate academic need for which there is no present academic degree, major, minor, concentration, emphasis or endorsement. In a formal business memorandum, addressed to the academic department chair(s), and jointly signed by the student and the faculty member working with the student, an FAS must be requested. An FAS request, taking the form of a specific educational objective, or objectives, and specification of the completed coursework necessary for meeting the objective, or objectives, must be approved by the department chair(s) of the department(s) in which the coursework is to be completed. The chair of the academic department in which the student is pursuing an academic major is responsible for monitoring the students FAS progress, and for notifying the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs when the FAS has been completed and a letter of completion is justified. The Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs issues the "Letter of Completion" and authorizes the Registration Office to enter notice of the letter in the students academic transcript.

Admission

Admission Categories

Student-at-Large: A person applying as a "Student-at-Large" must submit a completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 fee, transcripts from all degree-granting institutions and a notarized affidavit of moral character.

At Extended Studies Division sites, admission of "Students at Large" to take graduate-level Education courses is granted by the ESD site director. Students must submit all required application materials to the ESD site for approval by the director.

Non-Degree Student: A person applying as a "Non-Degree Student" must submit a completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 fee, transcripts from all degree-granting institutions, and a notarized affidavit of moral character.

At Extended Studies Division sites, admission of "Non-Degree Students" to take graduate level Education courses is granted by the ESD site director. Students must submit all required application materials to the ESD site for approval by the director.

Post-Baccalaureate Student: A person applying as a "Post-Baccalaureate Student" must complete steps 1-5 under Application Procedures. Post-Baccalaureate students seeking the MAT degree and teacher certification may enroll in graduate courses with permission of the Education Department. Post-Baccalaureate students must earn a grade of B or higher in undergraduate and graduate courses.

At Extended Studies Division sites, admission of students in the Post-Baccalaureate status is granted based on consideration of the state in which the program is located. In Missouri, admission in Post-Baccalaureate is granted by the MAT Program Director at the main campus. Application materials must be submitted through the ESD site for approval. Outside Missouri, Extended Studies Division Site Directors at sites approved to offer the full MAT Degree program may approve students for admission in the "Post-Baccalaureate" status. Upon completion of the prerequisites, students must apply through the ESD site for full program admission.

Full Admission: In addition to the application procedures and requirements for admission previously listed, applicants for the MAT must submit:

  1. A personal career goal summary which demonstrates that the applicant has goals and personal qualities which are compatible with the goals and competencies focused upon in the program; and
  2. A notarized Affidavit of Moral Character (available from the Admissions Office).
Applicants who have successfully completed admission procedures required by Columbia College will be evaluated by the Education Department for acceptance into the Master of Arts in Teaching Degree Program. To be considered, applicants must meet the following criteria:
  1. A baccalaureate degree in education, or a baccalaureate degree with a background in psychology, communications and education, with specific coursework in developmental psychology, assessment, and methods and materials of instruction. Students are encouraged to evaluate their preparation and remediate any deficiencies before applying to the graduate program.
  2. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale from a regionally accredited degree-granting institution, or a cumulative score of at least 1600 or 500 each on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the Graduate Record Examination.
Students not meeting these criteria may petition for admittance. Petitions must be accompanied by written justification and substantiating documentation.

Program Requirements

  1. Students must meet the satisfactory academic progress requirements of the College.
  2. Students must complete a minimum of thirty-six graduate semester hours in an approved course of study. The program is comprised of a core of three courses required of all students, and at least two courses in each of the three areas of curriculum and instruction, psychological and philosophical foundations, and measurement and evaluation.

    Required Core Courses (9 hours)
    EDUC 500 Research Design3 hours
    EDUC 504 Curriculum Design and Evaluations3 hours
    EDUC 508 Integrative Project 3 hours

    Support Courses in each area (18 hours)
    Curriculum and Instruction6 hours
    Psychological and Philosophical Foundations6 hours
    Measurement and Evaluation6 hours

    Elective or emphasis courses (9 hours)
    Course 13 hours
    Course 23 hours
    Course 33 hours
    Minimum Total Hours36 hours

  3. Transfer credit for courses already completed before admittance to the program may be substituted for required courses upon recommendation of the Education Department. After being admitted, the student must complete all course work at Columbia College, unless specific permission is obtained prior to enrollment. A maximum of nine graduate hours may be accepted in transfer.
  4. To complete the program, students are expected to do the following:
    1. Within the first session on campus, meet with an advisor to discuss career goals and program outcomes. The advisors signature on the registration form is required until an approved course of study is on file.
    2. Complete EDUC 500 Research Design, and EDUC 504 Curriculum Design and Evaluation, as early in the program as possible, and define a final project topic area early in the course of study and direct course work toward the topic area throughout the program.
    3. Upon completion of nine semester hours, file an intended program of study, which includes course work to be taken and personal goals and outcomes to be achieved. Once approved, students are expected to follow this program; any changes should be approved by the advisor.
    4. Students may not register for EDUC 508 Integrative Project until they have an approved proposal. Students who register for EDUC 508, but do not complete the course in one session, will receive a grade of Incomplete. Subsequently, students must continue to register each session until the project is completed and accepted. Failure to maintain continuous enrollment will result in the Incomplete in EDUC 508 converting to a grade of "F."
    5. Clinical experiences are available for a maximum of six hours of graduate credit. The purpose of clinical experiences is to provide an opportunity to do field research or to conduct professional practice, the experience must not duplicate previous experience or be a part of a regular teaching assignment.
  5. Completion of the degree means more than the accumulation of the required course hours. Students must be aware that the integrative project requires acceptance as demonstrated by a satisfactory oral presentation before a jury of faculty and peers.
  6. Students must participate in a final review, which includes a portfolio that documents progress toward exit competencies and program goals, a self-evaluation which demonstrates an ability to reflect and use analytic and creative skills, a collaborative assessment with faculty, and an evaluation of the program.

OTHER MAT PROGRAMS

DESE ALTERNATIVE ROUTE TO CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

Certain students, having a baccalaureate degree relating to secondary certification areas, may be eligible for a Temporary Certificate to teach in Missouri and may be eligible to negotiate a program of studies at Columbia College to maintain Temporary Certification. This is a program defined by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE).

Interested students should contact the Director of Teacher Education Program to inquire about this route to certification.

ALTERNATIVE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM OF STUDY

A candidate for Alternative Certification must present evidence of the following:
  • A baccalaureate degree (2.5 GPA minimum) with a major in Art, Business, Language Arts (English), Social Studies, or Mathematics discipline. Included in the degree must be general education coursework that has been determined by the Evaluations Office to be sufficient to meet Columbia College standards;
  • Three years of professional (post-baccalaureate) employment experience*;
  • A valid current contract with a school district**;
  • Admission as a Student-at-Large into the Master of Arts in Teaching Program; and
  • Completion of a two-year Academic Contract outlining the Program of Study and requirements to be met.
* Evidence of experience may include letters from former employers detailing job responsibilities and time of employment. Similar information from colleagues may serve as well to meet this requirement. Any other documents supporting employment experience may be submitted similarly. Regardless of form, all evidence of employment must be submitted at the same time admission is sought, and must be on file in the office of the Teacher Education Program prior to the beginning of coursework. Program completers will have a minimum of five years professional work experience.

** A copy of the contract must be on file in the office of the Teacher Education Program prior to acceptance into the Alternative Certification Program.

Required in the Program of Study (18 hours) for Alternative Certification are:

EDUC 505 - Instructional Theory and Techniques
EDUC 508 - Integrative Project (Initiating and Culminating Experience)
EDUC 525 - Educating Exceptional Individuals
EDUC 560 - Theories of Learning
EDUC 563 - Managing Classroom Environments
EDUC 580 - Methods of Effective Academic Evaluation
PRAXIS II - The appropriate examination must be successfully taken by the end of the first year of the Academic Contract, or the contract is void.

A supervising professor from the College will observe the candidate teach at least once per semester, and will be available to counsel or assist the candidate, as needed, via email, fax or telephone. The supervising professor will meet annually with the candidates principal to determine the teaching progress and performance of the candidate. Teaching progress and performance is defined as 56 of 80 points on the First-Year Principals Evaluation, and as 60 of 80 points on the Second-Year Principals Evaluation. Failure to annually demonstrate teaching progress and performance voids the Academic Contract.

The school at which the candidate is employed must provide an on-site teacher/mentor in the area of certification being sought. The school must provide to the Columbia College Teacher Education Program the name of the mentor and a brief description of the mentoring process. The school also must provide the candidate professional development opportunities throughout the two-year program. Proof of participation in professional development must take the form of evidence that the candidate is successfully participating in a performance-based teacher evaluation process. Failure to annually provide proof of successful participation voids the Academic Contract.

The Program of Study is a two-year process. If the process is not completed in two years, the Academic Contract is void.

THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE INSTRUCTORS PROGRAM

The objective of the program is to train community college instructors who are firmly grounded in their academic areas of expertise, as well as in the pedagogical methods and techniques appropriate for adult learners.

Potential emphasis areas are those for which a major is offered by Columbia College, including: Art, Business Administration, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Criminal Justice Administration, English, History, Natural Sciences, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. To be admitted to the program, applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in the academic content area sought as an emphasis area, and must meet all other entry requirements.

MAT with the Academic Content Area Emphasis: Proposed Program of Study:
Core Courses
EDUC 500Research Design3 hours
EDUC 504Curriculum Design and Evaluation3 hours
EDUC 508Integrative Project3 hours
9 hours
Curriculum and Instruction
EDUC 524Teaching for Critical Thinking3 hours
EDUC 532Technology in Education3 hours
6 hours
Psychological and Philosophical Foundations
EDUC 550Human Development3 hours
EDUC 560Theories of Learning3 hours
6 hours
Measurement and Evaluation
EDUC 580Methods of Effective Academic Evaluation3 hours
EDUC 582Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness3 hours
6 hours
Content Area Emphasis
AREA 650Course Title**3 hours
AREA 652Course Title3 hours
AREA 654Course Title3 hours
AREA 656Course Title3 hours
AREA 658Course Title3 hours
AREA 660Course Title3 hours
EDUC 699Internship3 hours
21 hours
Completed Program***48 hours

*The Integrative Project must relate to the academic content area specialization, and should meet the requirements for publication or presentation.

** The course title would always begin "Teaching ____," for example "Teaching History: Western Civilization," "Teaching Psychology: Theories of Personality," etc.

***The Completed Program may be in any content area that currently is a major area of study at Columbia College. Departments may choose to participate by designating a sequence of courses that may be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit, and submitting the necessary documentation for faculty governance approval. Interested students should contact the Chairperson of the Education Department.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Core Courses

EDUC 500 Research Design 3 hours
The study and use of the more important research designs. Data collection methods emphasized will be observation and psychometry. Both qualitative and quantitative data analysis methods will be studied, with a strong emphasis on results interpretation.

EDUC 504 Curriculum Design and Evaluation 3 hours
The study of curriculum design from historical precedent to current models of curriculum construction, implementation, and evaluation.

EDUC 508 Integrative Project 3 hours
The application of research and evaluative skills. Seen as the culminating experience, this course involves a demonstration of expertise in designing, conducting, and reporting educational research. Action research will be emphasized, but other research designs may be acceptable. However, students must be aware that the integrative project requires acceptance, as demonstrated by a satisfactory oral presentation before a jury of faculty and peers. Also, students must participate in a final review, which includes a portfolio, which documents progress toward exit competencies and program goals, a self-evaluation, which demonstrates an ability to reflect and use analytic and creative skills, a collaborative assessment with faculty, and an evaluation of the program. Students should consult their advisor in the semester prior to enrollment to begin planning this experience. Project completion may take more than one session. Prerequisites: EDUC 500, an approved proposal, and instructor's permission.

Curriculum and Instruction

EDUC 505 Instructional Theory and Techniques 3 hours
Professional planning of instruction including goals and objectives, techniques and activities, and evaluation. Students produce and present lessons containing defensible techniques, strategies, and methods of evaluation.

EDUC 512 The Integrated Curriculum 3 hours
The study of research, theorists and proponents of the integrated curriculum and instruction in the elementary, middle level, and secondary schools.

EDUC 514 Mathematics for the Special Needs Child (remedial) 3 hours
This course is designed to provide specific theories and strategies of teaching mathematics to children with special needs. Techniques of remediation and intervention in math instruction at various ability levels will be discussed. There will be a strong application component to this course. Developmentally appropriate practices will be presented. This course is specifically designed for teachers of children with mild/moderate disabilities.

EDUC 515 Language Development for the Exceptional Child 3 hours
Study of the stages and characteristics of language development with an emphasis on the needs of exceptional children and learners of English as a second language, to allow practicing classroom teachers to apply this knowledge to the acquisition and development of exceptional children in various educational settings.

EDUC 516 Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum 3 hours
The study of the theoretical framework for directed language use in all content areas, with emphasis on establishing a consistent set of language standards, practices and uses. Applications in various contents, curricula and with various ability levels will be developed.

EDUC 518 Literature Across the Curriculum 3 hours
The study of potential contributions of literature, including traditional and more broadly defined categories, in all teaching and learning situations. Familiarity with the literature available and appropriate by genre, content and age group, criteria by which to evaluate written materials for appropriateness, and applications within specific subject areas and developmental stages, is stressed.

EDUC 521 Language, Literature, and the Creative Arts for Elementary and Middle Schools 3 hours
The study of the creative arts (music and art) and language arts curricula emphasizing developmentally appropriate literature. This study includes instructional decisions, teaching techniques, and narrative and expository text related to aesthetic and language modes of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students produce a thematic unit based on a literature piece which involves drama, music, art, and content area material. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EDUC 523 Critical and Creative Problem Solving 3 hours
The study of critical and creative problem solving as it applies to teaching and learning. Cognitive understanding of the major models of critical thinking and creativity will be reinforced by experiences which require higher levels of thinking, including analysis, evaluation and creating; creative problem solving, self-expression and original synthesis of design within content or interest areas.

EDUC 525 Educating Exceptional Individuals 3 hours
A study of all components affecting the education of exceptional individuals. Variables addressed include: the type and extent of the handicapping condition; the legal conditions and constraints influencing placement and instruction; the roles of the personnel who work with exceptional students, including special teachers, classroom teachers, parents, administrators, and counselors; methods and materials used in instruction; classroom management. The role of the classroom teacher will be emphasized.

EDUC 526 Teaching and Supervising Pre-Service and In-Service Teachers 3 hours
A study of the role of the practicing professional in the instruction and supervision of pre-service teachers in clinical settings. Variables studied include: the relational roles of the college supervisor, cooperating teacher and pre-service teacher; the developmental process and procedures appropriate for pre-service teachers at various stages of professional development; the roles of the cooperating teacher (model, teacher, demonstrator, coach, critic, evaluator, supporter, mentor). The phases of instruction (planning, implementation and evaluation), and the methods of instruction, including inquiry, direct, interactive and cooperative, individual and group, as they relate to clinical experiences, will be utilized as one component of this course. Presentation and evaluation skills used by teachers in in-service situations and in professional conferences will be addressed.

EDUC 527 Introduction to Mild to Moderate Cross-Categorical 3 hours
An overview of mild/moderate disabilities, including learning disabilities, behavior disorders, mental retardation, physical disabilities and other health impairments. Course content focuses on identification and characteristics of students with mild to moderate disabilities in each category.

EDUC 528 Methods of Teaching Mild/Moderate Cross-Categorical Students 3 hours
A study of the methods, materials, resources, requirements and responsibilities of teachers working with students with mild to moderate disabilities, including learning disabilities, behavioral disorders, mental retardation, and physical disabilities and other health impairments. Course content focuses on developing instructional strategies to provide effective programs in a range of placements. Emphasis is on the team model of planning and delivery, including parents, regular education teachers, administration and support specialists.

EDUC 529 Curriculum and Instruction for Gifted Students 3 hours
The course will investigate topics which include the historical background of education for the gifted and talented; the concept of giftedness and characteristics of the gifted and talented; assessment of the gifted and talented; various models and programs for education of the gifted and talented.

EDUC 530 Administration and Supervision of the Gifted Program 3 hours
The study of the gifted program administration. Focused upon are the understanding of, and the skills needed for, the supervising and administering a gifted program in elementary and secondary schools. This class will include a study of the origins of gifted education; identifying giftedness; the instructional models in use; and, the selection of staff. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EDUC 531 Survey of the Gifted and Talented 3 hours
Overview of the intellectual, social and emotional characteristics of the gifted and talented. An investigation of the concept of giftedness, assessment of the gifted and talented which include: cognitive, affective, physical and intuitive functions.

EDUC 532 Technology in Education 3 hours
The study of instructional media and its use in the classroom. Traditional media and the latest technology are investigated. Provided are opportunities to work with the various mediums, produce materials, and integrate mediated experiences into instruction. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EDUC 533 Topics 1-3 hours

Psychological and Philosophical Foundations

EDUC 542 Law, Ethics, and Education 3 hours
The study of practices within education from both the legal and ethical perspectives. Values, morality and ethics are addressed from historical and current frameworks and applied to legal and practical questions of practical importance to educators. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 544 Current Issues and Philosophical Precedents 3 hours
The study of current issues in education, and education reform, such as: educational practice; specialization and professionalization; governance; finance; legal precedents; cultural, social and ethnic influences; and equal opportunity demands. Issues are explored from the philosophical precedents formed in idealism, realism, perennialism, essentialism, pragmatism, progressivism, social constructivism, humanism, existentialism, philosophical analysis and emerging reform philosophies. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 546 Perspectives on Parental, Community, and Political Involvement in Public Schools 3 hours
The study of relationships between the schools and professional educators and the people and agencies outside the schools which influence and affect them. Formal and informal relationships are identified and positive and negative effects discussed. Strategies for fostering and improving cooperative involvement and support are developed and a practical application is required. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 547 Career Counseling Including Children With Special Needs 3 hours
The study of and application of theory, procedures and techniques of career counseling. Career identification and decision making will be emphasized. Techniques for preparing students with special needs to make the transition from special education to community living. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 548 Communications-Counseling, Conferencing, and Confronting 3 hours
The study of communications within the context of interpersonal transactions within educational settings. Counseling, and counseling theories, mediating, conferring and advocating are studied and applied. Special attention is given to community resource agencies, multidisciplinary teams and exceptional children and their parents. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 550 Human Development 3 hours
The study of human development. Students must complete the Course Core Component and two Specialized Components. The Core Component addresses human development from the theoretical perspectives of psychoanalysis, behaviorism, and phenomenology. Specialization Components focus on the unique physiological, cognitive, and affective/social characteristics of human beings in age-graded, developmental eras, and on how these characteristics modify practice requirements. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 552 Foundations of Counseling Psychology 3 hours
The study of principles, methods and theories of counseling, and an orientation to personal and professional development in counseling. Emphasized are theoretical and applied approaches to the helping relationship. The focus is on developing an eclectic counseling approach, interviewing skills, empathy skills, and awareness of the client-therapist relationship. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Arranged Offering.

EDUC 553 Group Counseling 3 hours
The study of psychological theories, methods and techniques used in group counseling. A focus will be differing types of groups and counseling goals. Group dynamics and processes will also be an emphasis of study. Students will gain experiences leading and participating in groups, with reflective evaluation of those experiences. Prerequisite: EDUC 552.

EDUC 555 Development, Gender and Cultural Differences 3 hours
The study of diversity as it pertains to gender and cultural differences. Issues examined will include topics such as economic, social, cultural, political, religious, ethnic, racial, and gender influences. Other factors explored may include: macro and micro systems; interpersonal differences in areas such as attraction, affiliation, conformity, prejudice, sexism; and processes such as social change, urban and rural socialization, intergender and intragender communication, and the balance of work, health, relationships and leisure pursuits. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 556 Emotional Disorders in Children and Adolescents 3 hours
The study of the effects of emotional disorders on children's cognitive, affective, and psychomotor behaviors, as well as remedial and rehabilitative strategies. Students will identify those strategies that are effective in the classroom with students exhibiting emotional disorders. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 560 Theories of Learning 3 hours
The study of major learning theories including those proposed by Skinner, Pavlov, Bandura, Piaget, Bruner, Sternberg, and others. Current and historical research into the application of theoretical knowledge in education systems are addressed. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 561 Crisis Intervention 3 hours
The study of crisis intervention counseling, with an emphasis on outreach intervention models. Theory and practice will be the course focus. Demonstration of skills will be required. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 562 Behavior Management Techniques 3 hours
A study of the theories of behavior management as applied to school environments with teachers, children, support personnel, parents and special needs personnel as contributing variables. Prevention, supportive and corrective aspects are included. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 563 Management of the Classroom Environment 3 hours
The study of classroom management techniques. Students analyze classroom variables related to organization and governance; study theories relevant to classroom motivation, discipline and communications to evaluate classroom practices; and develop a management system. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Measurement and Evaluation

EDUC 570 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 3 hours
The study of parametric and nonparametric statistics used in the behavioral sciences. Included will be analyses of relationship and variance, as well as effect sizes associated with each. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 572 Individual Ability/Intelligence Testing 3 hours
The study of individual intelligence testing, using the most current measures. Application will be stressed. However, becoming soundly grounded in theory and accurate interpretation will be an important goal of the course. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 574 Evaluation of Individual Achievement and Aptitude 3 hours
The study and practice of individual aptitude and achievement testing. Instruction in the interpretation of individual assessments of achievement, formal and informal, for the purpose of developing prescriptive instruction is the emphasis. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 580 Methods of Effective Academic Evaluation 3 hours
A study of formative, placement, diagnostic and summative evaluation. Emphasis is on the development, administration, interpretation and utilization of informal, teacher-made evaluation measures, to include paper-pencil and observation instruments. These measures may be norm-referenced, criterion referenced, or learner referenced. Additionally, students will learn to read and interpret formal assessment data produced by either parametric or nonparametric statistics. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 582 Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness 3 hours
The study of methods, models and materials which can be used to analyze teaching effectiveness. Variables studied include: input and output measures as standards; the relationship between goals and measurements; criterion, norm and self-referencing; intended use-formative or summative; sources-peer, supervisor, self and client; personal or mediated; formal or informal; systematic or random; planned or spontaneous. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 590 Analysis and Correction of Reading Disabilities 3 hours
The study of current commercially prepared instruments for reading evaluation, construction of instruments for classroom and specialist use, and analysis and interpretation of testing results. Final projects will include long-term prescriptive programs for specific identifiable reading difficulties. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Related Area: Field Experiences

EDUC 610 Practicum 1-6 hours
A field based experience in which students apply the concepts being studied within a particular class to a real situation under the direction and supervision of a master teacher and a faculty member. Designed primarily for students who are not currently teaching or who do not have access to a classroom setting, the practicum is a focused experience that must be developed and approved prior to enrollment. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

EDUC 613 Practicum: Mild/Moderate Cross Categorical Special Education 3 hours
Application theory of special education as well as legal requirements for students and teachers in authentic teaching situations. A supervised introduction to the multi-faceted role of a special education teacher, including consultant and care manager. Students will spend 120 clock hours in the field and 24 hours in seminar to meet the requirements of the course. May be repeated one time for a total of 6 hours of credit. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing; Completion of EDUC 527, EDUC 528, EDUC 548, and EDUC 562.

EDUC 614 Practicum for Special Reading Teachers 3 hours
Application of the theory of Reading Diagnosis and Prescription in authentic classroom situations; a supervised introduction to Special Reading programs. Students will spend 120 clock hours in the field and 24 hours in seminar to meet the requirements of the course. May be repeated one time for a total of 6 hours of credit. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing; completion of one course in Reading Diagnosis and Correction.

EDUC 615 Practicum for the Gifted and Talented 3 hours
Application of the theory of Gifted and Talented Education in authentic classroom situations; a supervised introduction to Gifted and Talented programs. Students will spend 120 clock hours in the field and 24 hours in seminar to meet the requirements of the course. May be repeated one time for a total of 6 hours of credit. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing; Completion of Survey of Gifted and Talented Education.

EDUC 633 Topics 1-3 hours

EDUC 699 Internship 1-6 hours
Students engage in professional practice. Education students will practice under the supervision of a master teacher and a faculty member. A seminar experience accompanies practice to facilitate reflection and study of the Internship experience. The Internship is generally a culminating experience in the program of study and may be taken concurrently with EDUC 508. Prerequisite: All course work completed except for EDUC 508.


MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Business Administration Department Chair: Kenneth A. Middleton, Ph.D.
MBA Graduate Program Director: Anthony S. Marshall, Ph.D.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) offers a balance of theory and practice. The mission of the MBA program is to prepare working adults in the early stages of their careers in small or middle-sized organizations with the knowledge, skills, and personal characteristics that will enhance performance in their present occupation, and prepare them for advancement to upper-level management in the future.

A principal strategy for achievement of this overall goal is to employ a balanced educational approach that includes a rich mixture of business theory and practice. The MBA program complements management development activities which, in combination, prepare working adults for advancement within an organization. To this end, the MBA program enhances career opportunities in the management of business firms or other formally organized enterprises. Therefore, the program centers on a professional approach which balances business theory with practice in the search for knowledge, skills, and methodologies that are useful in formulating strategies for the future in an uncertain and often turbulent business environment.

ADMISSION

Admission Categories

Full Program: Students applying for Full Program admission must complete steps 1-4 listed under Application Procedures (page 17).
At Extended Studies Division sites approved to offer the full MBA program, admission to the program is granted by the ESD Site Director. Students must submit all required application materials to the ESD site for approval by the director.
Non-Degree: Those applying as Non-Degree Seeking students must complete steps 1-4 listed under Application Procedures (page 17), complete all prerequisite course work, and present a minimum 3.0 undergraduate cumulative grade point average.
At Extended Studies Division sites admission of "Non-Degree" students to take graduate level Business Administration courses is granted by the ESD Site Director. Students must submit all required application materials to the ESD site for approval by the director.
Post Baccalaureate: Those applying as Post Baccalaureate must complete steps 1-4 listed under Application Procedures (page 17). Students must earn a grade of B or higher in undergraduate prerequisites in order to be considered for full admission to the MBA program.
At Extended Studies Division sites admission of students in the Post-Baccalaureate status is granted based on considerations of the state in which the program is located. In Missouri, admission in Post-Baccalaureate students is granted by the MBA Program Director at home campus. Application materials must be submitted through the ESD campus for approval. Outside Missouri, Extended Studies Division Site Directors at sites approved to offer the full MBA Degree Program may approve students for admission in the "Post-Baccalaureate" status. Upon completion of the prerequisites, students must apply through the ESD campus for full program admission.

Admission Criteria

Serving the needs of working adults with graduate studies in business is a guiding principle in the MBA program. To this end, admission to the MBA program rests heavily upon the extent to which the applicant has had the opportunity for work-related experience that would complement further study in business at the graduate level. Applicants who have recently completed undergraduate studies are encouraged first to enter the world of work and then later to seek admission to the MBA program after obtaining a larger experiential base, unless there is a compelling reason to waive this fundamental requirement for admittance.

Applicants who have successfully completed graduate admission procedures required by Columbia College listed on page 17 will be evaluated by the Department of Business Administration for admission to the MBA program. The MBA program is open to all who are qualified and show promise for success in graduate study.

Students who have not completed the following concept courses in their baccalaureate degree and cannot show evidence of professional experience or other preparation must complete these courses (or their equivalent) before being considered for admission to the MBA program:

ACCT 280 Accounting I (Financial)3 hrs
ACCT 281 Accounting II (Managerial)3 hrs
FINC 350 Business Finance3 hrs
MKTG 310 Principles of Marketing3 hrs
MGMT 330 Principles of Management3 hrs
ACCT 280, ACCT 281, and FINC 350 must be taken sequentially.

The following factors are considered in the admission process:

  1. A baccalaureate degree with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above from a regionally-accredited institution, as represented by official transcripts from the degree-granting institution.
  2. The potential of the student to achieve academic and career goals by enrolling in the MBA program. This factor requires evaluation of the narrative component of the application and three graduate program recommendation forms attesting to the ability of the student to complete the MBA program.

Conditional Admission

Students not meeting the department admission requirements may be approved for "conditional admission" at the discretion of the Director of the MBA Program, based on appropriate professional experience or other preparation. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in each of the first two graduate courses for which they are enrolled in order to be reviewed for full admission to the MBA program.

Program Requirements

Degree requirements include common core courses and integrate foundation courses for a minimum of 36 semester hours. The foundation courses must be among the first 18 hours of course work in the MBA program.

Required Graduate Foundation Courses (12 semester hours)
BUSI 508 Decision Science for Business3 hrs
BUSI 510 Managerial Economics3 hrs
BUSI 562 Managerial Accounting3 hrs
BUSI 570 Managerial Finance3 hrs
Required Graduate Core Courses (24 semester hours)
BUSI 502 Information Systems for Management3 hrs
BUSI 504 Business Communication Theory and Practice3 hrs
BUSI 506 Legal and Ethical Environment for Business3 hrs
BUSI 522 Organizational Theory and Practice3 hrs
BUSI 526 Human Resource Management and Theory3 hrs
BUSI 528 International Marketing3 hrs
BUSI 544 Marketing Strategy3 hrs
BUSI 595 Strategic Management (Capstone Course*) 3 hrs
Minimum total semester hours36 hrs

*The capstone course is to be taken during the last two sessions of enrollment in the MBA program. Students must earn a B or higher in this course in order to graduate.

Focused Academic Sequence: Baccalaureate or Graduate

A Focused Academic Sequence (FAS) can be developed and implemented to quickly and effectively respond to a students specific needs. Any student may request an FAS to meet any baccalaureate or graduate academic need for which there is no present academic degree, major, minor, concentration, emphasis or endorsement.

In a formal business memorandum, addressed to the academic department chair(s), and jointly signed by the student and the faculty member working with the student, an FAS must be requested. An FAS request, taking the form of a specific educational objective, or objectives, and specification of the completed coursework necessary for meeting the objective, or objectives, must be approved by the department chair(s) of the department(s) in which the coursework is to be completed. The chair of the academic department in which the student is pursuing an academic major is responsible for monitoring the students FAS progress, and for notifying the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs when the FAS has been completed and a letter of completion is justified. The Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs issues the "Letter of Completion" and authorizes the Registration Office to enter notice of the letter in the students academic transcript.

Assessment

Competent performance as a manager requires both context and judgment. As a result, assessment will rely less on purely knowledge-based experiences and more on the students ability to prepare for and master various "roles" and situations that competent professionals encounter in their work. The goal in assessment is to use methods that replicate authentic challenges and conditions rather than isolated drills or tests. Use of the case method and discussion learning is a primary component of courses in the MBA program.

Skilled managers recognize that judgment in adapting knowledge to the situation at hand is, perhaps, more important than the acquisition of knowledge alone. Therefore, students will be challenged to perform or execute tasks or processes using a knowledge base effectively and in a novel or creative way. The process adapts to changing environmental situationsmuch like those that are dealt with on a day-to-day basis in the course of managing a formal organization. The assessment process not only provides the opportunity to evaluate the completion of performance tasks but also measures skills and personal characteristics that are essential for managers and to foster further learning.

Projects and assignments other than tests will be emphasized. The process requires the student, under time constraints, to present his or her case clearly, concisely, and persuasively, a skill that is invaluable to effective managers. The principal product of the MBA program will be a graduate who has learned how to think strategically and critically and is able to present his or her thoughts orally or in writing in a competent manner. The relevant measure becomes the students capacity to apply critical thinking and analytical skills in whatever occupation is chosen.

The most critical element of the assessment process occurs as part of the students culminating experience. Both product and process components that form key outcomes or performance tasks must be completed satisfactorily as part of the culminating experience (BUSI 595: Strategic Management).

Case work from BUSI 595 affords the opportunity for students to demonstrate competency in each area of study covered in the MBA program. With the approval and guidance of the instructor, the student may also experience a real-world analysis and presentation of material specific to the students place of employment. Each component of the case work is measured against standards and these standards are included in the course syllabus for BUSI 595. Students refer to their study of Strategic Management and case analysis as the process for developing the portfolio and demonstrating their level of critical thinking, judgment, analytical skill, and the ability to communicate in writing and/or orally.

BUSINESS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BUSI 502 Information Systems for Management 3 hours
Examination of the value and uses of information systems for business operations, management decision-making, and strategic advantage. Discussions and applications focus on spreadsheet software and its usefulness as a managerial aid.

BUSI 504 Business Communication Theory and Practice 3 hours
This course is designed to strengthen students written and oral presentation skills. Topics include proposal writing, resume preparation, interviewing, public speaking and listening. Discussions focus on processes of self-criticism, feedback from others and rewriting and rehearsing.

BUSI 506 Legal and Ethical Environment for Business 3 hours
This course examines the topics in the area of law, regulatory controls, and ethical issues. Topics include contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, agency agreements, partnerships, corporations, and product liability. Discussions focus on the implications of these legal situations in management.

BUSI 508 Decision Science for Business 3 hours
This course examines quantitative skills useful to managers. Discussions focus on selected algebra topics, mathematics for finance, and descriptive statistics and probability. Prerequisite: Knowledge of College Algebra, Excel or other computer spreadsheet applications is important.

BUSI 510 Managerial Economics 3 hours
Examination of the impact of the economic environment on business decision-making. Discussions focus on macro- and microeconomics topics with particular emphasis on marginal analysis and supply and demand considerations. Prerequisite: BUSI 508.

BUSI 522 Organizational Theory and Practice 3 hours
Examination of modern concepts of effective management. Discussions focus on foundations, theories, models, and literature for designing effective organizational relationships.

BUSI 526 Human Resource Management and Theory 3 hours
This course examines the organizational human resource function and contemporary techniques for managing human resources. Discussions focus on EEO law, work force diversity, managing change, staffing, training and development, compensation and benefits, EEO/AA and other human resource topics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

BUSI 528 International Marketing 3 hours
International Marketing addresses global issues and describes concepts relevant to all international marketers, regardless of the extent of their international involvement. Topics include cultural environment, competition, changing marketing structures, ethics and social responsibility, collaborative relationships, and the development of marketing for the 21st century. Emphasis is on the strategic implications of competition in different country markets. The course provides an approach and framework for identifying and analyzing the important cultural and environmental uniqueness of any nation or global region. In addition issues specific to exporting are discussed. Prerequisite: BUSI 544.

BUSI 544 Marketing Strategy 3 hours
The course is organized around the marketing planning process to clearly delineate the relationship among marketing decisions. Marketing functions are examined through case analysis to successfully integrate all elements of the managerial process. The course presents concepts from a decision making perspective rather than from a descriptive point of view. This approach reflects an emphasis on the marketing decisions that students are most likely to confront in their careers. Additionally, because marketing managers are held accountable for profits as well as sales, budgetary considerations of marketing decisions will be discussed.

BUSI 550 Readings 1-2 hours
The course is designed to provide transfer students with additional subject matter content. Students will research works in current professional journals in the appropriate subject area. Prerequisite: transfer student.

BUSI 562 Managerial Accounting 3 hours
Examination of the process involved with development, interpretation and application of accounting information for managerial decision-making. Discussions focus on the use of financial information within organizations for the purpose of planning activities, controlling operations and making decisions.

BUSI 570 Managerial Finance 3 hours
Examination of the process of evaluating financial resources and planning and controlling activities within the firm. Discussions focus on ratio and funds flow analysis, financial forecasting, development and use of budgets for management and planning and control. Prerequisite: BUSI 508.

BUSI 595 Strategic Management 3 hours
Examination of the practice of strategic management leading to the formulation and implementation of strategies for each level of an organization. Case analysis is used extensively as a business simulation tool for development of skills in assessing the internal and external environment as a prelude to strategy selection. This course is required of all students as the culminating experience for the MBA program. Prerequisites: BUSI 544, completion of 30 semester hours in the MBA program.


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Criminal Justice Administration and Social Work Department Chair: Barry R. Langford, J.D.
MSCJ Graduate Program Director: Michael Lyman, Ph.D.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ) is designed primarily for practitioners in the field of criminal justice interested in developing and/or enhancing administrative skills. The program is also designed to meet the analytical and theoretical needs of students who will continue with doctoral or law studies. The degree emphasizes four foundational areas: trends in criminal justice, policy development and analysis, research design, and ethics in criminal justice. Understanding derived from these courses provides graduate students a solid foundation for dealing with the many critical issues confronting the contemporary criminal justice administrator. Courses are structured in a hands-on format encouraging maximum student interaction while at the same time encouraging the development of useful action skills.

ADMISSION

Admission Categories

Full Program: Students applying for Full Program admission must complete steps 1-4 listed under Application Procedures (page 17).
At Extended Studies Division sites approved to offer the full MSCJ program, admission to the program is granted by the MSCJ Program Director at the Home Campus. Students must submit all required application materials to the ESD site for approval by the director.
Student-at-Large: Students applying as "Student-at-Large" must submit a completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 fee, and transcripts from all degree-granting institutions.
At Extended Studies Division sites admission of "Students at Large" to take graduate level Criminal Justice courses is granted by the ESD Site Director. Students must submit all required application materials to the ESD site for approval by the director.
Non-Degree: Those applying as Non-Degree Seeking students must submit a completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 fee, and transcripts from all degree-granting institutions.
At Extended Studies Division sites admission of "Non-Degree" students to take graduate level Criminal Justice courses is granted by the ESD Site Director. Students must submit all required application materials to the ESD site for approval by the director.
Post Baccalaureate: Those applying as Post Baccalaureate students must submit a completed and signed application for graduate admission, accompanied by a non-refundable $25 fee, and transcripts from all degree granting institutions. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in undergraduate prerequisites in order to be considered for full admission to the MSCJ program.
At Extended Studies Division sites admission of students in the Post-Baccalaureate status is granted based on considerations of the state in which the program is located. In Missouri, admission in Post-Baccalaureate students is granted by the MSCJ Program Director at home campus. Application materials must be submitted through the ESD campus for approval. Outside Missouri, Extended Studies Division Site Directors at sites approved to offer the full MSCJ Degree Program may approve students for admission in the "Post Baccalaureate" status. Upon completion of the prerequisites, students must apply through the ESD campus for full program admission.

Admission Criteria

Applicants who have completed admission procedures will be evaluated by the faculty of the Criminal Justice Administration and Social Work Department for acceptance into the Master of Science in Criminal Justice degree program. To be considered, applicants must meet the following criteria:
  1. A baccalaureate degree in criminal justice.
  2. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale from a regionally accredited degree-granting institution.

Students possessing a baccalaureate degree in a field other than criminal justice and who do not meet the minimum two-year experience requirement may enroll as a Post Baccalaureate. Students in this category must complete CJAD 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice and CJAD 415 Criminal Procedures, earning a grade of B or higher in both courses. Subsequent to successful completion of these courses students may be considered for admission to the MSCJ program. Post Baccalaureate students may take graduate courses with permission from the MSCJ Program Director.

Program Requirements

The degree requirements include 12 hours of foundation courses and 24 hours of core courses for a minimum of 36 semester hours.

Required Graduate Foundation Courses (12 semester hours)
MSCJ 500 Research Design3 hrs
MSCJ 501 Current Issues and Future Directions in Criminal Justice3 hrs
MSCJ 510 Legal and Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice3 hrs
MSCJ 524 Criminal Justice Policy Development and Evaluation3 hrs
Required Graduate Core Courses (24 semester hours)
MSCJ 525 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems3 hrs
MSCJ 526 Human Resource Management and Theory3 hrs
MSCJ 532 Organizational Behavior3 hrs
MSCJ 533 Topics in Criminal Justice3 hrs
MSCJ 550 Readings in Criminal Justice Administration3 hrs
MSCJ 561 Crisis Intervention3 hrs
MSCJ 567 Seminar in Juvenile Justice3 hrs
MSCJ 580 Capstone/lntensive Writing Seminar3 hrs
Minimum total semester hours36 hrs

Focused Academic Sequence: Baccalaureate or Graduate

A Focused Academic Sequence (FAS) can be developed and implemented to quickly and effectively respond to a students specific needs. Any student may request an FAS to meet any baccalaureate or graduate academic need for which there is no present academic degree, major, minor, concentration, emphasis or endorsement.

In a formal business memorandum, addressed to the academic department chair(s), and jointly signed by the student and the faculty member working with the student, an FAS must be requested. An FAS request, taking the form of a specific educational objective, or objectives, and specification of the completed coursework necessary for meeting the objective, or objectives, must be approved by the department chair(s) of the department(s) in which the coursework is to be completed. The chair of the academic department in which the student is pursuing an academic major is responsible for monitoring the students FAS progress, and for notifying the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs when the FAS has been completed and a letter of completion is justified. The Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs issues the "Letter of Completion" and authorizes the Registration Office to enter notice of the letter in the students academic transcript

CRIMINAL JUSTICE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MSCJ 500 Research Design 3 hours
The study of applied research designs. Data collection methods emphasized will be observation and psychometry. Both qualitative and quantitative data analysis methods will be studied, with strong emphasis on results interpretation. Must be taken as a foundational course for the Master of Science in Criminal Justice.

MSCJ 501 Current Issues and Future Directions in Criminal Justice 3 hours
An examination of the current critical issues in the justice system affecting law enforcement, criminal justice personnel, public policy, and recent social developments. Must be taken as a foundational course for the Master of Science in Criminal Justice.

MSCJ 510 Legal and Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice 3 hours
Examination of topics in the area of law, legal controls, and ethical issues in the criminal justice field. Areas such as corruption, misconduct, and related issues will be discussed.

MSCJ 522 Organizational Theory and Practice 3 hours
Examination of modern concepts of effective management. Discussions focus on foundations, theories, and literature for designing effective organizational relationships. The case approach is used extensively to develop a framework for analyzing the structural and contextual dimensions which impact organizational effectiveness.

MSCJ 524 Criminal Justice Policy Development and Evaluation 3 hours
Examination of the development, implementation, and analysis of public policy. Students identify and evaluate public policies as they relate to the criminal justice system.

MSCJ 525 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 3 hours
Examination of criminal justice systems worldwide. Includes exploration of means of establishing cooperation toward mutual goals despite structural, historical and ideological differences.

MSCJ 526 Human Resource Management and Theory 3 hours
Examination of the organizational human resource function and contemporary techniques for managing human resources. Discussions focus on work force diversity, managing change, staffing, training and development, compensation and benefits, EEO and other human resource and labor relations.

MSCJ 532 Organizational Behavior 3 hours
The study of individual and group behavior in organizational settings. Included are issues relating to how we live our lives at work and in organizations and are approached from a motivation, teamwork and leadership standpoint. Prerequisites: Students are encouraged to take the four foundational courses set forth in the college catalog (MSCJ 501, MSCJ 510, MSCJ 500, and MSCJ 524) before enrolling for any other MSCJ course.

MSCJ 533 Topics in Criminal Justice 3 hours
Intensive study of specially chosen topical areas with special emphasis on the systems concept as it applies to problem solving in the management of criminal justice.

MSCJ 550 Readings in Criminal Justice Administration 3 hours
Selected readings that allow the student to pursue areas of particular interest or need not covered in established courses or programs. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of required graduate foundation courses.

MSCJ 551 Readings 1-2 hours
This course is designed to provide transfer students with additional subject matter. Course involves research in current professional journals in the appropriate subject area. Prerequisite: Transfer student.

MSCJ 561 Crisis Intervention 3 hours
Study of the theory and practice of crisis intervention with an emphasis on outreach intervention models. Demonstration of skills is required. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of required graduate foundation courses.

MSCJ 567 Seminar in Juvenile Justice 3 hours
Analysis of all aspects of the juvenile justice system and process. Topics include history, movements toward diversion and deinstitutionalization, police interaction, court co-process, due process and community intervention. Included is an examination of the law as it relates to juvenile justice and future trends in the field.

MSCJ 580 Capstone/lntensive Writing Seminar 3 hours
This culminating experience requires students to refine their writing skills. Numerous assignments are given students with special attention to paper preparation in APA format, critical thinking content, identification of salient topics in the field, and presentation of findings. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours of required graduate foundation courses and an additional 18 semester hours of required graduate core courses.


COLUMBIA COLLEGE PERSONNEL DIRECTORY

Board of Trustees Administration Emeriti Faculty Faculty National Alumni Association

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Officers
Chairman Daniel L. Scotten
Vice Chairman Richard Montgomery
Secretary Daisy Grossnickle '66
Term Expires in 2002 Term Expires in 2003 Term Expires in 2004 Term Expires in 2001
Walter E. Bixby III '82
Kansas City, Missouri
Lynne Stuver Baker '64
Independence, Missouri
Jerry Daugherty
Columbia, Missouri
Mark Baisley
Aurora, Colorado
Gary Drewing
Columbia, Missouri
Eliot Battle
Columbia, Missouri
Don Landers
Columbia, Missouri
Patrick Smith
Columbia, Missouri
Richard Montgomery
Columbia, Missouri
Daisy Grossnickle '66
Columbia, Missouri
Robert W. Maupin
Columbia, Missouri
Ron Nielsen
Columbia, Missouri
Anthony Marshall*
Columbia, Missouri
Kenneth Middleton*
Columbia, Missouri
Peggy Price '43
Brookfield, Missouri
R. Marvin Owens
Columbia, Missouri
John A. Schiffman
St. Louis, Missouri
Daniel L. Scotten
Columbia, Missouri
J.W. Stan Stafford
Columbia, Missouri
Jolene Schultz '61
Columbia, Missouri
Dan Stubler
Columbia, Missouri
Marty Toler '46
Columbia, Missouri
Janet Wright
Columbia, Missouri
Rev. John J. Yonker
Columbia, Missouri
  *Faculty Representative    

Administration

Senior Administration

Gerald T. Brouder, President
A.A., Mayfair College; B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., University of Texas-Austin

Terry B. Smith, Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs, Professor of Political Science
B.A., Central Methodist College; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University

Mike Randerson, Assistant Vice President and Dean for the Extended Studies Division
B.A., Southern Illinois University-Carbondale; M.A., The George Washington University

Faye Burchard, Dean for Campus Life
B.S.E., Arkansas State University; M.A., East Carolina University

Bruce E. Boyer, Controller and Chief Financial Officer, C.P.A.
B.S., Bowling Green State University

Robert P. Burchard, Director of Athletics and Physical Recreation; Head Mens Basketball Coach
B.A., Catawba College; M.A., East Carolina University

Bob Hutton, Director of Plant and Facilities
B.S., Culver-Stockton College, M.Ed., Memphis State University; APPA Institute for Facilities Management and Housekeeping

Barbara S. Payne, Director of Public Relations and Marketing
B.S., University of Missouri-Columbia

John P. Schirmer, Director of Development and Alumni Services
B.A., Southern Methodist University; M.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City

Academic Affairs

Terry B. Smith, Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs, Professor of Political Science
B.A., Central Methodist College; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University

Arlin Epperson, Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies and Director of Distance Learning
B.S., University of Missouri-Columbia; M.A., ReD., Indiana University-Bloomington

Janet L. Griffith, Programmer Analyst II
B.S., University of Missouri-Columbia; B.S., Columbia College

Nancy Lombardi, Student Support Services Director
B.S., Central Missouri State University; M.Ed., University of Missouri-Columbia

Julie Meents, Assistant Professor of Biology and Grants Coordinator
B.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., New Mexico State University

Terry Obermoeller, Executive Assistant
B.S., University of Missouri-Columbia

Admissions

Regina Morin, Director of Admissions
B.S.E., M.A., Truman State University

Brian J. Allen, Admissions Counselor
B.A., Columbia College

Katherine E. Madden, Evening Admissions Counselor
B.A., Columbia College

Donna K. Monnig, Admissions Counselor
B.A., Columbia College

Kendra C. Robson, Associate Director of Admissions
B.S., William Woods University

Jeanette C. Rose, Admissions Counselor
B.A., Columbia College

Christina M. Vroegindewey, Admissions Counselor and Transfer Coordinator
B.A., Columbia College

Athletics

Robert P. Burchard, Director of Athletics and Physical Recreation; Head Mens Basketball Coach
B.A., Catawba College; M.A., East Carolina University

Jon Barfknecht, Certified Athletic Trainer and Athletic Training Coordinator
B.S., University of Iowa; M.A., Tennessee Technological University

Michael B. Davis, Head Womens Basketball Coach
B.S., Central Methodist College

John D. Klein, Head Soccer Coach
B.S., St. Louis University; M.B.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Wendy Spratt, Head Softball Coach
B.S., Columbia College; M.B.A., Central Missouri State University

Melinda Wrye-Washington, Head Volleyball Coach
B.A., Columbia College

Business Services

Bruce E. Boyer, Controller and Chief Financial Officer, C.P.A.
B.S., Bowling Green State University

Jason Becking, Director of Human Resources
B.S., M.B.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Joan E. Arnold, Director of Student Accounts
B.S., Tennessee Wesleyan College

Phyllis Grant, Payroll Manager
A. A., B.S., Columbia College

Campus Life

Faye Burchard, Dean for Campus Life
B.S.E., Arkansas State University; M.A., East Carolina University

William Anthony Claypool, Area Coordinator
B.A., Columbia College

Tyler E. Huffman, Area Coordinator
B.A., Columbia College

Kerry Keating, Director of Student Activities
B.S., William Woods University

Kim Kinyon, Director of Student Development
M.S., University of Missouri-Columbia

Linda Kolostov, Coordinator of Health Services
B.S.N., Illinois Weslayan College; M.S.N., University of Missouri

Don Malson, Coordinator of Career Services Center
B.S. Central Methodist College; M.Ed., Northeast Missouri State University

Julie P. Starkey, Director of Residential Life
B.B.A., Texas A&M; M.Ed., Southwest Texas State University

Shirley Wilbur, ADA Coordinator
B.A., Eastern College

Britta Wright, Coordinator of International Programs
A.A., Columbia College

Terri Zeilenga, Counselor
B.A., Hope College; M.A., University of Arizona

Center for Academic Excellence

Susan Franck, Mathematics Specialist
B.A., M.Ed., University of Missouri-Columbia

Dawn L. Ross, Mathematics Specialist
B.A., Western Washington State College; M.S., Oklahoma State University

Suzanne E. Tourville, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Coordinator of Mathematics Tutoring
B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., Ph.D., Washington University

Development and Alumni Services

John P. Schirmer, Executive Director
B.A., Southern Methodist University; M.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City

Susan Y. Davis, Director of Alumni Services
B.A., William Woods University

Philip Marley, Director of Development
B.A., B.S., Truman State University

John Randolph, Director of Advancement Services
B.A., Columbia College

Jane Thiedeman, Director of Annual Giving
B.A., Highlands University

Evaluations and Transcripts

Allyson M. Presley, Director of Evaluations and Transcripts
B.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Evening Campus

Eric Cunningham, Associate Dean for Adult Learning
B.S., U.S. Military Academy; M.S., Troy State; M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Lori L. Hoyt, Academic Advisor
B.A., Columbia College

Molly McGrath, Academic Advisor
B.A., Columbia College

Patti R. Skinner, Director of Evening Campus
B.A., Central Methodist College; M.A., Kansas State College-Pittsburgh

Extended Studies Division

Mike Randerson, Assistant Vice President and Dean for the Extended Studies Division
B.A., Southern Illinois University-Carbondale; M.A., The George Washington University

Eric Cunningham, Associate Dean for Adult Learning
B.S., U.S. Military Academy; M.S., Troy State; M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Ren´┐ŻNichols, Assistant Dean
A.A., B.A., M.B.A., Columbia College

Gary Oedewaldt, Assistant Dean
B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.A., Central Michigan University

Keith A. Abernathy, Director, Moberly, Missouri
B.S., M.S., Columbia College

Garland Berry, Director, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Texas
B.S., The Citidel; M.A., Webster University

Barbara Bickford, Director, Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico
B.S., M.S., University of California

Thomas Cason, Associate Dean and Director, Illinois Region
B.A., University of Alabama; M.A., Auburn University

Betty Due, Director, St. Louis, Missouri
B.S., Columbia College; M.A., Webster University

Bob Ernst, Director, Salt Lake City, Utah
A.S., City College of Chicago; B.A., N.C. Wesleyan College; M.B.A., National University

John Keeney, Director, Lake Ozark, Missouri
B.S., M.A., Southeast Missouri State University; Ph.D., University of Mississippi

Joyce Keitel, Director, Jefferson City, Missouri
B.S., Lincoln University; M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

C. John Keith, Director, Los Alamitos, California
B.Mus., Oberlin College; M.Mus., University of Cincinnati

David King, Director, Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri
B.S., Southwest Missouri State University; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Marjean Knokey, Associate Director, Whidbey Island, Washington
B.A., Oregon State University; M.A., Columbia University

Lisa Kochevar, Director, Coast Guard Island and Sacramento, California
B.S., University of Southern Colorado; M.A., California State University, San Bernardino

Maggie Kracke, Director, Christian County/Marshfield, Missouri
B.S., M.B.A., Lindenwood College

Wallace Tabe Lovin, Director, Jacksonville, Florida
B.S., University of the State of New York; M.S., Troy State University

Kurt Miller, Director, Aurora, Colorado
B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., Chapman University

Oliver Miller, Director, Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico
B.A., Pacific Union College; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Mary F. Morgan, Director, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama
B.S., University of Texas; M.Ed., University of Texas

Jeff Musgrove, Director, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida
B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., Webster University

Shirley Paremore, Director, Ft. Stewart and Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia
B.S., Barry University; M.B.A., Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Jeff Reed, Director, Marysville, Washington
B.A., Western Washington University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University

Joseph Reed, Director, Orlando, Florida
B.A., Columbia College; M.A., Webster University

Leasa Richards-Mealy, Director, Rolla, Missouri
B.S., Columbia College; M.A., Webster University

David Smith, Director, Lemoore, California
B.A., M.A., California State University; Ph.D., University of Denver

Karen Smith, Director, Salt Lake City, Utah
B.A., California State Polytechnic University; M.A., Hamilton University

Jeff Stone, Director, Kansas City, Missouri
B.A., Sterling College; M.A., Fort Hayes State University

Dawn Wagner, Director, Crystal Lake and Elgin, Illinois
B.S., M.B.A. Northern Illinois University

Peter Willging, Director, Freeport, Illinois
B.S., M.A., Northern Illinois University

Financial Aid

Sharon Abernathy, Director
B.S., Southeast Missouri State University

Institutional Research

Sheila Brynjulfson, Research Analyst
B.A., Columbia College

Library

Janet Caruthers, Director and Coordinator of Audiovisual Services
B.A., Central Missouri State University; M.A.L.S., University of Missouri-Columbia

Lucia A. DAgostino, Reference Librarian
B.S., Columbia College; M.L.S., University of Missouri-Columbia

Vandy L. Evermon, Technical Services Librarian
B.A., Central State University, Oklahoma; M.A.L.S., University of Missouri-Columbia

Music Activities

Nollie Moore, Jr., Instructor of Music, and Director of Jane Froman Singers
B.S., M.Ed., University of Missouri-Columbia

Plant and Facilities Operations

Bob Hutton, Director of Plant & Facilities
B.S., Culver-Stockton College; M.Ed., Memphis State University; APPA Institute for Facilities Management and Housekeeping

President

Gerald T. Brouder, President
A.A., Mayfair College; B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., University of Texas-Austin

Lori Ewing, Executive Assistant
B.S.E., Northeast Missouri State University

Public Relations and Marketing

Barbara S. Payne, Director
B.S., University of Missouri-Columbia

Technology Services

Rick W. Powell, Director
B.A., Columbia College; M.A., Webster University

Emeriti Faculty

Paulina A. Batterson, Professor Emerita of Government
A.B., Marietta College; M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

L. Novelle Dunathan, Professor Emerita of Education
B.A., Northwestern University; M.S., University of Utah; Ed.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Dennis M. Grev, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry
A.B., Mankato State University; M.S., University of Missouri-Columbia

Elaine T. Grev, Professor Emerita of Music
B.S., M.M.Ed., University of Missouri-Columbia

Helga Huang, Professor Emerita of Sociology
A.B., National Taiwan University; M.C.L., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Sidney Larson, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Art
A.B., M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

David OHagan, Professor Emeritus of Music
A.B., Furman University; M.Mus., Indiana University

Faculty

Full-Time Faculty at Columbia Campus

Anthony M. Alioto, Professor of History
B.S., University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh; M.A., PhD., Ohio University

Ann M. Bledsoe, Instructor of Mathematics
B.S., Southwest Missouri State University, M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Ben D. Cameron, Professor of Art
B.S., St. Louis University; M.A., University of Iowa; M.F.A. University of Cincinnati

Joseph J. Carrier, Instructor of Criminal Justice
B.A., Southeastern Louisiana University; M.A. University of Missouri-Columbia; Certification in Law Enforcement

Ed C. Collings, Professor of Art
A.B., M.A., M.F.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Carolyn F. Dickinson, Associate Professor of English
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Arlin Epperson, Associate Professor of Business Administration
B.S., University of Missouri-Columbia; M.A., ReD., Indiana University-Bloomington

Kathleen Fitzgerald, Instructor of Sociology
B.A., St. Louis University; M.A., Southern Illinois University

Lisa Ford-Brown, Assistant Professor of Speech Communication
B.S., M.A., Indiana State University; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University

Cheryl Hardy, Professor of Psychology
B.S., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton

Ann Harvey, Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., Central Missouri State University; M.Ed., Lincoln University; Ed.Sp., Ed.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Hoyt Hayes, Associate Professor of Business
B.S., M.B.A., Western Illinois University; M.A., Eastern Illinois University; Ph.D., Mississippi State University

Graham E. Higgs, Assistant Professor of Education and Psychology
B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Tennessee

Jacqueline High, Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., M.A., Bradley University-Peoria; Ed.D., Roosevelt University

Melanie L. Hoffmann, Assistant Professor of Chemistry
B.S., Rhodes College; M.S., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

Timothy Ireland, Assistant Professor of Business
B.A., Kansas State University; B.B.A., Washburn University; M.A., University of Iowa; M.B.A., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Emory University

Erick Kelemen, Assistant Professor of English
B.A., University of Texas; M.A., Ph.D., University of Delaware

James F. Kern, Visiting Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., Southwest Missouri State University; M.A., Ed.Sp., Northeast Missouri State University; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Brian L. Kessel, Assistant Professor of Political Science
B.A., University of Northern Iowa; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa

Barry R. Langford, Visiting Instructor of Criminal Justice
B.A., J.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Brad D. Lookingbill, Assistant Professor of History
B.A., Southwestern Oklahoma State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Toledo

Michael Lyman, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
B.S., M.S., Wichita State University; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Anthony S. Marshall, Professor of Business
B.A., M.A., Central Missouri State University; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Celeste A. Mazzacano, Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Julie Meents, Assistant Professor of Biology and Grants Coordinator
B.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., New Mexico State University

Lizbeth Brydges Metscher, Instructor of ESL and Coordinator of ESOL
B.S., Oklahoma State University; M.A., University of Oklahoma

Kenneth A. Middleton, Associate Professor of Business Administration
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Arizona State University

Nollie Moore, Jr., Instructor of Music, Director of Jane Froman Singers
B.S., M.Ed., University of Missouri-Columbia

Laura M. Parker, Instructor of Social Work
B.A., University of Wisconsin-Whitewater; M.S.W., University of Missouri-Columbia

Michael J. Perkins, Instructor of Social Work
B.A., Columbia College; M.S.W., University of Missouri-Columbia; L.C.S.W.

Michael J. Polley, Associate Professor of History
B.A., St. Joseph's College; M.A., Washington State University; M.A., Temple University; Ph.D., Washington State University

Mark L. Price, Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy
A.A., Dalton College; B.A., University of Georgia; M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

David Roebuck, Associate Professor of Political Science
B.A., M.S.S., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., University of Mississippi

Michael Sleadd, Assistant Professor of Art
B.A., Georgetown College; M.F.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Thomas J. Stauder, Instructor of Business Administration
B.S., M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Naomi Sugino, Assistant Professor of Art
B.MUS, B.A., Eastern Illinois University; M.F.A., Wichita State University

Diane R. Suhler, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
A.A., Otero Junior College; B.S., University of Colorado;, M.I.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Maryland

Ronald D. Taylor, Professor of Psychology
B.S., M.S., Troy State University; Ed.D., University of Houston

Kenneth G. Torke, Associate Professor of Biology
B.A., Concordia College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Suzanne E. Tourville, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., Ph.D., Washington University

Roberta Uhrig, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
B.S., Kearney State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Nebraska

J. Thomas Watson, Professor of Art
B.A., Harding College, M.A., M.F.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

B. Joann Wayman, Professor of Business
B.S., Northeast Missouri State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Sarah S. Wells, Assistant Professor of Business
B.A., M.B.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Lawrence W. West, Associate Professor of Computer Information Systems
B.S., Southwest Missouri State University; Ph.D., The University of Kansas

Becky J. Widener, Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., Southeast Missouri State University; M.A., Webster University; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Paul D. Wiedemeier, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Sciences
B.S, Drake University; M.S., Michigan Technological University

Jean Marie "Lia" Willis, Visiting Instructor of Social Work
B.A., M.S.W., University of Missouri-Columbia

National Alumni Association

Board of Directors

President Carol Winkler '93
Columbia, MO
President Elect Joe Reardon '93
Columbia, MO
Vice President William "Bill" J. Johnston '92
Columbia, MO
Secretary/Treasurer Cheryl Grazier 78
Jefferson City, MO
Immediate Past President Alan D. Harris '77
Kansas City, MO
Alumni Trustee Lynne Stuver Baker '64
Independence, MO
Directors Amber Boykins 91
St. Louis, MO
Travis Hume '00
Columbia, MO
Judy Cone Johnson '55 & '95
Independence, MO
Sheree Lowe '75
Excelsior Springs, MO
Linda Nelson '94
Independence, MO
Desmond Peters '97
Columbia, MO
Lollie Zander Reed '68
Lee's Summit, MO
Peggy Reed-Lohmeyer '89
Fulton, MO
Cindy Ridgeway '96
Columbia, MO
Helen "Dale" Coe Simons '65
Austin, TX
Lonnie C. Tapia '82
Columbia, MO
Cheryl Elbe Ward '57
Kansas City, MO

All graduates and former students requesting membership belong to the Columbia College National Alumni Association, which includes more than 25,000 members. Its purposes are to promote in alumni and alumni groups an active interest in the College; to establish mutually beneficial relations among the College, its alumni, and its friends; and to support the College through financial assistance, individual expertise, and voluntary service.

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