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Master Syllabus

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Administrative Unit: Humanities Department
Course Prefix and Number: MUSI 181
Course Title: Applied Lessons Voice
Number of:
Credit Hours 1
Lecture Hours 0
Lab Hours 1
Catalog Description:

The study of proper vocal techniques to enhance the production of the singing voice. Advanced courses extend the study and practice of proper techniques by using progressively technical vocal literature. Students must successfully complete each level twice before advancing to the next level.

Prerequisite(s) / Corequisite(s): Ability to match pitch.
Text(s): Most current editions of the following:

Basics of Vocal Pedagogy
By Clifton Ware
Handbook of Diction for Singers
By David Adams
Course Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate increased technical ability by the end of each semester of Studio Applied private lessons.
  2. Use personal practice time effectively and efficiently.
  3. Demonstrate developing ability for self-evaluation and assessment.
Major Topics/Skills to be Covered:
  • Physical Stance
  • Breath Management
  • Vocalization
  • Pronunciation of basic vowels in the singing languages
  • Use of consonants
  • Productive practicing
  • Learning a song

Recommended maximum class size for this course: 10

Library Resources:

Online databases are available at You may access them from off-campus using your CougarTrack login and password when prompted.

Prepared by: Nollie Moore Date: April 15, 2015
NOTE: The intention of this master course syllabus is to provide an outline of the contents of this course, as specified by the faculty of Columbia College, regardless of who teaches the course, when it is taught, or where it is taught. Faculty members teaching this course for Columbia College are expected to facilitate learning pursuant to the course learning outcomes and cover the subjects listed in the Major Topics/Skills to be Covered section. However, instructors are also encouraged to cover additional topics of interest so long as those topics are relevant to the course's subject. The master syllabus is, therefore, prescriptive in nature but also allows for a diversity of individual approaches to course material.

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