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MASTER SYLLABUS

Master Syllabus

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Administrative Unit: Humanities Department
Course Prefix and Number: MUSI 102
Course Title: Music Fundamentals
Number of:
Credit Hours 3
Lecture Hours 3
Lab Hours 0
Catalog Description:

This course is designed for non-music majors to fulfill music minor requirements, or the non-music major. Course work includes staff, clefs, scales, key signatures, triads, meter and rhythm, application of theory at the keyboard, and aural skill development. Computer programs to supplement course work may be required.

 
Prerequisite(s) / Corequisite(s): Ability to read music.
 
Course Rotation for Day Program:

Offered odd Spring.

 
Text(s): Most current editions of the following:

Any text appropriate for courses in Music Appreciation.

The Music Kit
By Manoff, Tom (W.W. Norton & Co)
Recommended
Basic Materials in Music Theory: A Programmed Course
By Steinke & Harder (Prentice-Hall)
Recommended
 
Course Objectives
  • To understand sound as it relates to musical notation symbols.
  • To recognize major, minor and chromatic scales.
  • To recognize intervals and major, minor, diminished and augmented triads.
  • To understand the terminology relating to tempo and dynamics.
  • To construct major and minor scales, intervals and rhythms through keyboard/computer aided instruction.

  •  
    Measurable Learning
    Outcomes:
  • Quickly name, verbally and in written form, the lines and spaces in the treble clef.
  • Quickly name, verbally and in written form, the lines and spaces in the bass clef.
  • Name verbally and in written form the lines and spaces of the alto and tenor C clefs.
  • Recognize verbally and in written form the lines and spaces of the alto and tenor C clefs.
  • Recognize verbally and in written form note values of whole notes to sixteenth notes.
  • Recognize verbally and in written form rest values of whole rests to sixteenth rests.
  • Identify aurally and visually duple, triple, and quadruple meter or time signatures and note groupings.
  • Perform (by handclapping) duple, triple, and quadruple patterns involving whole to sixteenth note values.
  • Reproduce in written form (rhythmic dictation) rhythmic patterns involving whole to sixteenth note values that are played or clapped by the instructor.
  • Construct in written form all major scales in treble and bass clefs.
  • Identify major keys immediately by the key signature.
  • Play all major scales at the keyboard.
  • Construct in written form all three forms of minor scales.
  • Identify minor keys immediately by the key signature.
  • Play all three forms of all minor scales at the keyboard.
  • Recognize aurally and construct in written form the following intervals: m2, M2, m3, M3, P4, P5, m6, M6, m7, M7, P8.
  • Play any interval from any note on the keyboard.
  • Construct in written form all augmented and diminished intervals.
  • Recognize visually and construct in written form major, minor, diminished, and augmented triads and their inversions.
  • Recognize visually and construct in written form dominant seventh chords and their inversions.
  • Recognize visually and construct in written form half diminished and fully diminished seventh chords and their inversions.
  • Recognize aurally the I - IV - V - I chord progression.
  • Play the progression on the keyboard in at least the following keys: C major, F major, G major, Bb major, D major.
  •  
    Topical Outline:
  • Music notation symbols
  • Rhythm
  • Pitches
  • Scales
  • Intervals
  • Triad construction
  • Dynamics and tempo
  •  

    Recommended maximum class size for this course: 10

     
    Library Resources:

    Online databases are available at http://www.ccis.edu/offices/library/index.asp. You may access them from off-campus using your CougarTrack login and password when prompted.

     
    Prepared by: Nollie Moore Date: February 22, 2013
    NOTE: The intention of this master course syllabus is to provide an outline of the contents of this course, as specified by the faculty of Columbia College, regardless of who teaches the course, when it is taught, or where it is taught. Faculty members teaching this course for Columbia College are expected to facilitate learning pursuant to the course objectives and cover the subjects listed in the topical outline. However, instructors are also encouraged to cover additional topics of interest so long as those topics are relevant to the course's subject. The master syllabus is, therefore, prescriptive in nature but also allows for a diversity of individual approaches to course material.

    Office of Academic Affairs
    12/04