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MASTER SYLLABUS

Master Syllabus

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Administrative Unit: Business Administration Department
Course Prefix and Number: MGMT 254
Course Title: Business Communication
Number of:
Credit Hours 3
Lecture Hours 3
Lab Hours 0
Catalog Description: Development of written, oral and interpersonal skills for effective communication in the business world. Emphasis on clear, effective business correspondence, improved interpersonal skills and public speaking. Students learn appropriate real-world skills and strategies to increase their abilities to use this knowledge. Prerequisite: ENGL 112.
 
Prerequisite(s) / Corequisite(s): ENGL 112.
 
Course Rotation for Day Program: Offered Fall and Spring.
 
Text(s): Most current editions of the following:

Business and Administrative Communication
By Locker, Kitty O. (McGraw-Hill)
Recommended
 
Course Objectives
  • To identify and use writing strategies more likely to obtain the desired reader’s response.
  • To develop and apply an awareness and understanding of small group and cross-cultural communication determinants and issues affecting individual or organizational success.
  • To prepare and deliver an effective oral presentation designed to create a positive image.
  • To develop an effective writing and editing plan prior to beginning a writing project.
  • To develop communication strategies for dealing with various oral and written business communication situations.
  •  
    Measurable Learning Outcomes:
  • Write effective business memos, letters, and reports.
  • Create an effective job search strategy, resume, and cover letter.
  • Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills.
  • Prepare and deliver effective oral presentations.
  • Communicate orally in one-on-one, small group, and large group situations.
  • Apply appropriate writing techniques when communicating good news, bad news, or in persuasive messages.
  •  
    Topical Outline:

     • Write documents using concepts of building goodwill, adapting your message, increasing its readability, planning, composing and revising • Letters, memos and e-mail messages: writing informative, positive, negative, persuasive, rational, and promotional communications • Interpersonal and cross-cultural communications: identify common communication problems and experience improving your communications • Reports and oral presentations: write a report and prepare and deliver one or more excellent oral presentations • Resumes, cover letters, and job search: plan a professional job search and write a professional resume and cover letter for a specific purpose

     
    Culminating Experience Statement:

    Material from this course may be tested on the Major Field Test (MFT) administered during the Culminating Experience course for the degree. 
    During this course the ETS Proficiency Profile may be administered.  This 40-minute standardized test measures learning in general education courses.  The results of the tests are used by faculty to improve the general education curriculum at the College.

     

    Recommended maximum class size for this course: 20

     
    Library Resources:

    Online databases are available at http://www.ccis.edu/offices/library/index.asp. You may access them from off-campus using your CougarTrack login and password when prompted.

     
    Prepared by: Kenneth Akers Date: April 25, 2013
    NOTE: The intention of this master course syllabus is to provide an outline of the contents of this course, as specified by the faculty of Columbia College, regardless of who teaches the course, when it is taught, or where it is taught. Faculty members teaching this course for Columbia College are expected to facilitate learning pursuant to the course objectives and cover the subjects listed in the topical outline. However, instructors are also encouraged to cover additional topics of interest so long as those topics are relevant to the course's subject. The master syllabus is, therefore, prescriptive in nature but also allows for a diversity of individual approaches to course material.

    Office of Academic Affairs
    12/04