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MASTER SYLLABUS

Master Syllabus

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Administrative Unit: Humanities Department
Course Prefix and Number: ENGL 112
Course Title: English Composition II
Number of:
Credit Hours 3
Lecture Hours 3
Lab Hours 0
Catalog Description:

Continued practice of the process of argumentative academic writing, applied to literary texts and culminating in a research paper. Students who do not earn a grade of C or higher must reenroll in ENGL 112 the succeeding term. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in ENGL 111, or placement by ACT English Score or by SAT Writing Score: students whose ACT English Score is from 30 to 36 or whose SAT Writing Score is from 660 to 800 will be placed in ENGL 112. G.E. Offered Fall and Spring.

 
Prerequisite(s) / Corequisite(s):

Grade of C or higher in ENGL 111, or placement by ACT English Score or by SAT Writing Score: students whose ACT English Score is from 30 to 36 or whose SAT Writing Score is from 660 to 800 will be placed in ENGL 112.

 
Course Rotation for Day Program: Offered Fall and Spring.
 
Text(s): Most current editions of the following:

Required texts must include: -A reader of literary texts (poems, short fiction, drama) chosen from texts 1-6 below. -A supplemental text (such as handbook, rhetoric, or handbook-rhetoric combination) that provides information and guidance for writers of research papers, and which includes formatting guidelines for current MLA and other prominent documentation styles. Texts 7-13 below satisfy this requirement; however, the list does not exclude the choice of other handbooks and supplements designed for composition, in their most recent editions.

In addition, campus administrators and/or composition instructors may coordinate reuse of ENGL 111 textbooks and/or handbooks in ENGL 112. It is approved for ENGL 112 instructors to reuse, for example, texts 1 and 7 (which also appear on the ENGL 111 master syllabus) together. In such areas of reuse, all care must be taken not to assign material that has already been covered in ENGL 111:



Literature, An Introduction
By J. Kennedy and Dana Gioia (Longman)
Category/Comments - literature anthology with apparatus
Recommended
Bedford Introduction to Literature
By Michael Meyer (Bedford)
Category/Comments - literature anthology with apparatus
Recommended
Literature: Reading Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and the Essay
By Robert Di Yanni (McGraw Hill)
Category/Comments - literature literature anthology with apparatus
Recommended
An Introduction to Literature
By Sylvan Barnet et. al. (Longman)
Category/Comments - literature anthology with apparatus
Recommended
The Norton Introduction to Literature
By Alison Booth and Kelly J. Mays (Norton)
Category/Comments - literature anthology with apparatus
Recommended
Literature for Composition
By Sylvan Barnet et. al. (Longman)
Category/Comments - literature anthology with introductory apparatus, designed to provide texts for composition
Recommended
The Little, Brown Handbook
By Ramsey Fowler (Pearson)
Category/Comments - handbook with discussion of research
Recommended
A Writer's Reference with Exercises
By Diana Hacker and Nancy Sommers (Bedford)
Category/Comments - handbook with discussion of research
Recommended
The Hodges, Harbrace Handbook
By Cheryl Glenn and Loretta Gray (Wadsworth)
Category/Comments - handbook with discussion of research
Recommended
The Curious Researcher
By Bruce Ballenger (Longman)
Category/Comments - guide to research
Recommended
Envision: Writing and Researching Arguments
By Christine Alfano and Alyssa O'Brien (Wadsworth)
Category/Comments - guide to analysis, argument, research
Recommended
Writing Research Papers
By Jim D. Lester Jr. and James D. Lester (Longman)
Category/Comments - guide to research
Recommended
Writing Research Papers: A Norton Guide
By Melissa Walker (Norton)
Category/Comments - guide to research
Required
 
Course Objectives
  • To demonstrate the ability to apply to texts the process of academic writing, including analysis, argumentation, and revision
  • To analyze complex texts
  • To be able to make and provide evidence for complex arguments
  • To demonstrate revision in response to self-criticism and feedback from instructors and peers
  • To be able to perform research that demonstrates the ability to identify and utilize appropriate peer-reviewed, critical sources in support of an argument
  • To understand the reasons behind responsible use and documentation of research sources
  • To master conventions of argumentative academic writing that requires research
 
Measurable Learning
Outcomes:
  • Implement the process of academic writing, including textual analysis, coherent argumentation with evidence, and revision
  • Analyze complex texts using literary concepts and terminology as appropriate
  • Differentiate among major genres of literature and explain how these appear in each genre
  • Evaluate arguments in the context of literary study
  • Demonstrate comprehnsion of subtlety, shades of meaning, and non-literal expression (such as metaphor) with regard to literary texts
  • Make and support ambitious, multifaceted arguments
  • Revise effectively and thoroughly, emphasizing organiational clarity, high standards of evidence, and conscientious editing
  • Revise in response to self-criticism, peer feedback, and instructor feedback
  • Complete at least one writing assignment that utilizes multiple kinds of feedback, such as instructor comments, peer review, and class-wide critique of a draft
  • Participate in feedback/revision processes
  • Perform reseach using both print and electronic sources
  • Integrate secondary, peer-reviewed works of literary criricism effectively and responsibly into an extended research essay, using a citation style such as MLA
  • Identify reasons for using and documenting research sources responsibly
  • Write polished academic essays, including a research essay that analyzes a literary text and utilizes works of peer-reviewed literary criticism
  • Develop skills in using complex and veried sentence structures that maintain correctness
 
Topical Outline:
  • Departmental policy that requires students to write and submit for evaluation well-developed, argumentative, analytical essays for a total of 2750-3750 words
  • Departmental policy requires students to write and submit for evaluation a substantial research essay (minimum 1000 words in length) that incorporates at least three works of literary criticism
  • Literary texts that lend themselves to critical analysis and which must include poetry, fiction, and drama
  • Discussion and analysis of literary texts that require complex approaches and understandings
  • Application of the full process of academic writing, including argumentation with high standards of evidence, to complex literary texts
  • Giving, receiving, and using feedback on written drafts
  • Use of college-level library resources for locating secondary, critical research sources (searching academic databases, distinguishing between reliable and unreliable sources, indentifying peer-reviewed sources, finding appropriate print sources)
  • An in-class exam that requires students to identify and discuss the conventions of academic writing, including the responsible use and documentation of secondary, critical research sources
 

Recommended maximum class size for this course: 20

 
Library Resources:

Online databases are available at http://www.ccis.edu/offices/library/index.asp. You may access them from off-campus using your CougarTrack login and password when prompted.

 
Prepared by: Peter Monacell Date: August 28, 2014
NOTE: The intention of this master course syllabus is to provide an outline of the contents of this course, as specified by the faculty of Columbia College, regardless of who teaches the course, when it is taught, or where it is taught. Faculty members teaching this course for Columbia College are expected to facilitate learning pursuant to the course objectives and cover the subjects listed in the topical outline. However, instructors are also encouraged to cover additional topics of interest so long as those topics are relevant to the course's subject. The master syllabus is, therefore, prescriptive in nature but also allows for a diversity of individual approaches to course material.

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