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MASTER SYLLABUS

Master Syllabus

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Administrative Unit: Humanities Department
Course Prefix and Number: ENGL 112
Course Title: English Composition II
Number of:
Credit Hours 3
Lecture Hours 3
Lab Hours 0
Catalog Description: Continued practice of expository writing, applied primarily to textual analysis (fiction, drama, poetry), and culminating in a research paper. Students who do not earn a grade of C or higher must reenroll in ENGL 112 the succeeding term. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in ENGL 111, or placement by ACT English Score or by SAT Writing Score: students whose ACT English Score is from 30 to 36 or whose SAT Writing Score is from 660 to 800 will be placed in ENGL 112. G.E. Offered Fall and Spring.
 
Prerequisite(s) / Corequisite(s): Grade of C or higher in ENGL 111, or placement by ACT English Score or by SAT Writing Score: students whose ACT English Score is from 30 to 36 or whose SAT Writing Score is from 660 to 800 will be placed in ENGL 112.
 
Course Rotation for Day Program: Offered Fall and Spring.
 
Text(s): Most current editions of the following:

Many English Composition texts are available. The recommended choices listed below are numerous, so please read the complete listings carefully.

Note: At some of the extended sites where English adjunct faculty and the local administration consider it necessary to continue in English 112 with at least one text used in English 111, the following combination has been approved as meeting the requirements for both composition courses and as demonstrating the different emphases in the two courses:

ENGL 111--Frank O’Hare and Edward Kline. The Modern Writer’s Handbook. Allyn and Bacon. (Serves as both rhetoric and Reader)

X.J. Kennedy and others. The Bedford Reader. Bedford.(Serves as both rhetoric and Reader)

ENGL 112--Frank O’Hare and Edward Kline. The Modern Writer’s Handbook. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. (Serves as handbook and as MLA documentation guide; also includes APA style)

Michael Meyer. The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature. Bedford. (Serves as anthology for introduction to literature--fiction, poetry, and drama--as guide for expository essays analyzing and interpreting literature, and as research and documentation reference for MLA style)

Required texts must include:
-An anthology of poetry, drama and short fiction (choose from texts 1-7 below);
-A research guide including current MLA, APA and other prominent documentation styles (choose from texts 8-11 below);
-A handbook of grammar for reference (choose from texts 12-15 below)

Literature: The Human Experience
By Abcarian & Klotz (St. Martin's)
Category/Comments - anthology of poetry, drama and short fiction
Recommended
Heath Guide to Literature
By Bergman, David
Category/Comments - anthology of poetry, drama and short fiction
Recommended
Literature: The Evolving Canon
By Birkuts, Sven P. (Allyn & Bacon)
Category/Comments - anthology of poetry, drama and short fiction
Recommended
Close Imaginings: An Introduction to Literature
By DeMott, Benjamin (Bedford)
Category/Comments - anthology of poetry, drama and short fiction
Recommended
Literature: Reading Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and the Essay
By DiYanni, Robert (McGraw-Hill)
Category/Comments - anthology of poetry, drama and short fiction
Recommended
Discovering Literature
By Guth & Rico (Prentice-Hall)
Category/Comments - anthology of poetry, drama and short fiction
Recommended
The Bedford Introduction to Literature - Compact Bedford Guide to Literature
By Meyer, Michael
Category/Comments - anthology of poetry, drama and short fiction
Recommended
Writing the Modern Research Paper
By Dees, Robert (Allyn & Bacon)
Category/Comments - research guide
Recommended
Writing Research Papers: A Complete Guide
By Lester, James D. (Harper Collins)
Category/Comments - research guide
Recommended
Little, Brown Guide to Writing Research Papers
By Meyer, Michael
Category/Comments - research guide
Recommended
Writing Research Papers: A Norton Guide
By Walker, Melissa (Norton)
Category/Comments - research guide
Recommended
The Little, Brown Handbook
By Fowler, H. R. & others
Category/Comments - handbook
Recommended
Harbrace College Handbook
By Hodges (Harcourt Brace)
Category/Comments - handbook
Recommended
The Modern Writer's Handbook
By O'Hare, F. & E. Kline (Allyn & Bacon)
Category/Comments - handbook
Recommended
Keys for Writers: A Brief Handbook
By Raines, A. (Houghton-Mifflin)
Category/Comments - handbook
Recommended
College-Level Dictionary

Required
Computer or word processing guidelines (as applicable)

Recommended
 
Course Objectives
  • To learn the interrelated skills of engaged reading, analytical thinking, and argumentative writing that are essential to college level research through close engagement with literary texts.
  •  
    Measurable Learning Outcomes:
  • Select and limit topics for composition as assigned.
  • Maintain coherence through written assignments by formulating a clear thesis, topic sentences, and transitional phrases, as well as effectively organizing evidence.
  • Differentiate among genres of literature, explain complex literary themes, and critically evaluate ideas in the context of literature.
  • Write about assigned readings, using literary terminology as appropriate; demonstrate comprehension of non-literal expression such as metaphor; in class recitation and writing; assess and criticize one’s own writing and the writings of others.
  • Recognize and practice effective sentence structures such as subordination, coordination, parallelism and active voice.
  • Recognize and correct “basic writing errors” such as fragments, fused sentences, dangling modifiers, spelling errors, incorrect punctuation and errors in agreement, reference and tense.
  • Write effective sentences that reflect an awareness of the power of words, by such means as varied sentence structure, precise idiom and appropriate diction and strong verbs.
  • Revise consciously, effectively, and thoroughly, emphasizing organizational clarity, high standards of evidence and sentence-level correctness.
  •  
    Topical Outline:
  • Most, 70-75%, of text readings will emphasize the introductory study of literature, including poetry, drama, and short fiction. The remaining 25-30% will emphasize nonliterary material chosen after consultation between student and instructor. The course must expose students to a substantial selection of canonical literature from various periods. Courses exploring particular literary themes or styles are appropriate only if they meet this criterion. Students will submit for evaluation a series of argumentative essays totaling no less than 4500 words, complete a two-hour final examination related to course content and complete a culminating research essay in order to pass the course.

  • Correct terminology for analyzing literature in different genres, writing analytical essays, and correcting grammatical error
  • Organizational concepts on the macro-level (thesis, topic sentences, transitions) and micro-level (sentence pattern variety, subordination, coordination, parallelism, grammatical and conceptual integration of evidence
  • Concepts of argumentation including standards of evidence, counterexample, fallacy, concession
  • Use of resources for research with specific emphasis on college-level library use (searching academic databases, distinguishing reliable sources from unreliable ones, finding appropriate print sources)
  • Conformity to academic citation styles
  •  

    Recommended maximum class size for this course: 20

     
    Library Resources:

    Online databases are available at http://www.ccis.edu/offices/library/index.asp. You may access them from off-campus using your CougarTrack login and password when prompted.

     
    Prepared by: Edward Christie Date: May 1, 2009
    NOTE: The intention of this master course syllabus is to provide an outline of the contents of this course, as specified by the faculty of Columbia College, regardless of who teaches the course, when it is taught, or where it is taught. Faculty members teaching this course for Columbia College are expected to facilitate learning pursuant to the course objectives and cover the subjects listed in the topical outline. However, instructors are also encouraged to cover additional topics of interest so long as those topics are relevant to the course's subject. The master syllabus is, therefore, prescriptive in nature but also allows for a diversity of individual approaches to course material.

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