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MASTER SYLLABUS

Master Syllabus

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Administrative Unit: Education Department
Course Prefix and Number: EDUC 583
Course Title: Elementary and Secondary School Principalship
Number of:
Credit Hours 3
Lecture Hours 3
Lab Hours 0
Catalog Description:

This course provides an overview of the multi-faceted roles and responsibilities of the school leader at the elementary or secondary level. School effectiveness, student achievement, and reflective practice are critical to the understanding of the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium Standards which frame the course. Prerequisite: Teacher certification in one or more areas.

 
Prerequisite(s) / Corequisite(s):

Teacher Certification in one or more areas.

 
Text(s): Most current editions of the following:

The Principalship: A Reflective Practice Perspective
By Sergiovanni, T.J.
Recommended
 
Course Objectives
  • To use collaborative structures to develop shared vision and mission, and to articulate and model standards for ethical, legal and moral behavior.
  • To promote the success of every student through the support structures and distributed leadership, and by mobilizing community, state, and federal resources.
  • To supervise instruction and guide teacher improvement plans.
  • To identify and select data for school improvement.

To identify factors in promoting the safety and well-being of students and staff.

 
Measurable Learning
Outcomes:
  • Develop a paper that illustrates a detailed process approach to the development of a shared vision and mission, incorporating the ISLLC Leadership standards, for a randomly assigned existing school in Missouri. Student preference will be given for a rural or urban district as the school setting.
  • Utilize resources identified by the professor to develop a plan that includes community, state, and federal resources for supporting the needs of all learners, based on the demographics, achievement, historical, and economic needs of a particular school.
  • Review and critique teacher observational data to develop Professional Improvement Plans that are determined to be helpful and acceptable to practicing teachers.
  • Write a school improvement plan using real, existing data for possible presentation to a school board or faculty for a given school.
  • Develop and propose a plan for discipline or inclusionary practices within their building which may be suitable for presentation to a faculty.
  • Write a comprehensive paper that articulates their learning from this course and they develop professional improvement plans for furthering their expertise in two or more ISLLC Standards.
 
Topical Outline:
  • Correlations to ethics, morals, and legal behavior for school leaders
  • Theoretical foundations and applications to current demands of school leaders
  • School community and school organization
  • Forces and dynamics of leadership
  • Development perspectives and styles of leadership
  • Characteristics of effective and successful schools
  • Clinical supervision and instructional improvement
  • Motivation, commitment, and change
 

Recommended maximum class size for this course: 15

 
Library Resources:

Online databases are available at http://www.ccis.edu/offices/library/index.asp. You may access them from off-campus using your CougarTrack login and password when prompted.

 
Prepared by: Teresa Vandover Date: September 16, 2012
NOTE: The intention of this master course syllabus is to provide an outline of the contents of this course, as specified by the faculty of Columbia College, regardless of who teaches the course, when it is taught, or where it is taught. Faculty members teaching this course for Columbia College are expected to facilitate learning pursuant to the course objectives and cover the subjects listed in the topical outline. However, instructors are also encouraged to cover additional topics of interest so long as those topics are relevant to the course's subject. The master syllabus is, therefore, prescriptive in nature but also allows for a diversity of individual approaches to course material.

Office of Academic Affairs
12/04