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MASTER SYLLABUS

Master Syllabus

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Administrative Unit: Computer and Mathematical Sciences Department
Course Prefix and Number: CISS 325
Course Title: Systems Analysis, Design and Implementation Projects
Number of:
Credit Hours 3
Lecture Hours 3
Lab Hours 0
Catalog Description: The systems analysis and design topics introduced in CISS 285 are applied to create one or more operational computer information systems. Prerequisite: CISS 285 (or CISS 280) with a grade of C or higher.
 
Prerequisite(s) / Corequisite(s): CISS 285 (or CISS 280) with a grade of C or higher.
 
Course Rotation for Day Program: Offered Spring.
 
Text(s): Most current editions of the following:

Systems Analysis and Design
By Kendall & Kendall (Prentice Hall)
Recommended
Systems Analysis and Design Methods
By Whitten, Bentley,& Barlow (Irwin/McGraw-Hill)
Recommended
Systems Analysis and Design in a Changing World
By Satzinger, Jackson, & Burd (Course Technologies, Inc)
Recommended
Introduction to Systems Analysis and Design: A Structured Approach
By Kendall, Penny (Business and Educational Technologies)
Recommended
Systems Analysis, Design and Implementation
By Burch (Boyd and Fraser)
Recommended
 
Course Objectives
  • To plan, analyze, design and implement a computer information systems project.
  • To explore detailed design and implementation issues of concepts introduced in CISS 285 (or CISS 280).
  •  
    Measurable Learning
    Outcomes:
  • Create system proposals.
  • Conduct a project feasibility analysis.
  • Create a master project repository.
  • Create a complete entity relationship diagram for a project.
  • Create a complete data flow diagram for a project.
  • Create and test input and output screen designs and associated user interface for a project.
  • Create and test a project’s underlying data repository.
  • Write and test a project’s computer programs.
  • Create and test a project’s underlying network infrastructure.
  • Collaborate with a team on a project.
  • Write project reports and present them orally.
  • Maintain a healthy working relationship with a designated customer.
  •  
    Topical Outline:
  • Planning and analysis of the information system project
  • Construction, implementation and testing of the information system project’s user interfaces
  • Construction, implementation and testing of the information system project’s output screens, reports and forms
  • Construction, implementation and testing of the information system project’s databases and files
  • Construction, implementation and testing of the information system project’s network infrastructure
  •  
    Culminating Experience Statement:

    Material from this course may be tested on the Major Field Test (MFT) administered during the Culminating Experience course for the degree. 
    During this course the ETS Proficiency Profile may be administered.  This 40-minute standardized test measures learning in general education courses.  The results of the tests are used by faculty to improve the general education curriculum at the College.

     

    Recommended maximum class size for this course: 30

     
    Library Resources:

    Online databases are available at http://www.ccis.edu/offices/library/index.asp. You may access them from off-campus using your CougarTrack login and password when prompted.

     
    Prepared by: Lawrence West Date: April 9, 2008
    NOTE: The intention of this master course syllabus is to provide an outline of the contents of this course, as specified by the faculty of Columbia College, regardless of who teaches the course, when it is taught, or where it is taught. Faculty members teaching this course for Columbia College are expected to facilitate learning pursuant to the course objectives and cover the subjects listed in the topical outline. However, instructors are also encouraged to cover additional topics of interest so long as those topics are relevant to the course's subject. The master syllabus is, therefore, prescriptive in nature but also allows for a diversity of individual approaches to course material.

    Office of Academic Affairs
    12/04