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MASTER SYLLABUS

Master Syllabus

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Administrative Unit: Physical and Biological Sciences Department
Course Prefix and Number: BIOL 290
Course Title: Principles of Cell Biology
Number of:
Credit Hours 3
Lecture Hours 3
Lab Hours 0
Catalog Description:

Theoretical foundations of basic cell biology, including structure, function and synthesis of the plasma membrane and subcellular organelles; cell adhesion and the extracellular matrix; cell transport, communication, division, cancer and programmed cell death. Students majoring in Biology must earn a grade of C or higher. Prerequisites: BIOL 110; CHEM 109 or CHEM 110. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 290L is strongly recommended.

 
Prerequisite(s) / Corequisite(s):

BIOL 110; CHEM 109 or CHEM 110. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 290L is strongly recommended.

 
Course Rotation for Day Program: Offered Fall.

 
Text(s): Most current editions of the following:

General texts addressing molecular aspects of cell biology are suitable, such as:

Essential Cell Biology
By Alberts, et al. (Garland)
Recommended
Molecular Cell Biology
By Lodish, et al. (W.H. Freeman)
Recommended
Cell and Molecular Biology Concepts and Experiments
By Karp (Wiley)
Recommended
The Cell: A Molecular Approach
By Cooper (ASM Press)
Recommended
 
Course Objectives
  • To examine fundamental principles that characterize cellular organization and function.
  • To understand the composition of biological membranes, and relate structure to specialized membrane functions.
  • To investigate mechanisms of hormonal and electrical signaling pathways.
  • To describe the composition, structure and function of the extracellular matrix and basal lamina, and relate it to the process of development.
  •  
    Measurable Learning Outcomes:
  • Summarize the fundamental principles that characterize cellular organization and function.
  • Describe experimental procedures used to study subcellular organelles, and determine which procedures should be used to examine given structures.
  • Distinguish between subcellular organelles, understand their individual functions, and explain how the integration of their specialized roles contributes to overall cellular function.
  • Delineate the mechanisms of cell cycle control, and illustrate how defects in this system lead to pathological conditions such as tumor formation.
  • Describe the composition of biological membranes, and relate membrane structure to specialized membrane functions.
  • Describe the mechanisms of hormonal and electrical signaling pathways, and compare and contrast between these pathways and their ultimate effects in cells.
  • Describe the composition, structure and function of the extracellular matrix and the basal lamina, and relate it to the process of development.
  •  
    Topical Outline:

  • Visualizing cells → model organisms, underlying concepts and operation of different microscopy techniques, methods for purification of subcellular organelles
  • Structure of biological membranes
  • Transport across biological membranes
  • Protein sorting into subcellular organelles, vesicular transport
  • The cytoskeleton
  • Cell cycle, cancer
  • Cell-to-cell adhesion and the extracellular matrix
  • Chemical signaling between cells, nerve cells
  • Stem cells

  •  
    Culminating Experience Statement:

    Material from this course may be tested on the Major Field Test (MFT) administered during the Culminating Experience course for the degree. 
    During this course the ETS Proficiency Profile may be administered.  This 40-minute standardized test measures learning in general education courses.  The results of the tests are used by faculty to improve the general education curriculum at the College.

     

    Recommended maximum class size for this course: 25

     
    Library Resources:

    Online databases are available at http://www.ccis.edu/offices/library/index.asp. You may access them from off-campus using your CougarTrack login and password when prompted.

     
    Prepared by: Elizabeth Critser Date: November 13, 2009
    NOTE: The intention of this master course syllabus is to provide an outline of the contents of this course, as specified by the faculty of Columbia College, regardless of who teaches the course, when it is taught, or where it is taught. Faculty members teaching this course for Columbia College are expected to facilitate learning pursuant to the course objectives and cover the subjects listed in the topical outline. However, instructors are also encouraged to cover additional topics of interest so long as those topics are relevant to the course's subject. The master syllabus is, therefore, prescriptive in nature but also allows for a diversity of individual approaches to course material.

    Office of Academic Affairs
    12/04