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MASTER SYLLABUS

Master Syllabus

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Administrative Unit: Art Department
Course Prefix and Number: ARTS 406
Course Title: American Art History
Number of:
Credit Hours 3
Lecture Hours 3
Lab Hours 0
Catalog Description: America’s early primitive tradition to its leading role in the contemporary art scene. Prerequisites: ARTS 111 and 112.
 
Prerequisite(s) / Corequisite(s): ARTS 111 and 112.
 
Course Rotation for Day Program: Offered Fall (2010, 2014, 2018).
 
Text(s): Most current editions of the following:

American Art: Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, Decorative Arts and Photography
By Milton V. Brown (Abrams)
Recommended
 
Course Objectives
  • To understand, explain, and evaluate the work of art under study.
  • To recognize the artistic style from each cultural period.
  • To interpret the style’s meaning in its historical context and explain how the style of an artwork expresses content.
  •  
    Measurable Learning Outcomes:
  • Evaluate the aesthetics of the artwork from each historical period.
  • Analyze the influences and affectations of the monuments from each period.
  • Describe the historical context of the artwork from each period and how it reflects the social, political and cultural history of that period.
  • Articulate intelligently about the art from each period.
  •  
    Topical Outline:
  • Traces American Art from the Colonial Period, and the Republic through the 19th Century and culminates with the advent of Abstract-Expressionism after World War II to Minimalism.
  •  

    Recommended maximum class size for this course: 30

     
    Library Resources:

    Online databases are available at http://www.ccis.edu/offices/library/index.asp. You may access them from off-campus using your CougarTrack login and password when prompted.

     
    Prepared by: Richard Baumann Date: April 3, 2008
    NOTE: The intention of this master course syllabus is to provide an outline of the contents of this course, as specified by the faculty of Columbia College, regardless of who teaches the course, when it is taught, or where it is taught. Faculty members teaching this course for Columbia College are expected to facilitate learning pursuant to the course objectives and cover the subjects listed in the topical outline. However, instructors are also encouraged to cover additional topics of interest so long as those topics are relevant to the course's subject. The master syllabus is, therefore, prescriptive in nature but also allows for a diversity of individual approaches to course material.

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    12/04