Effective: Late Spring 8-Week, 2017/2018

RUCS 101: Russian Culture And Society

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  Course Description

This course will acquaint you with Russian culture and society from early medieval times to the present.  This course explores the origins of Russian mentality and basic elements of the unique Russian Civilization.  During the course, a combination of the sources from history, literature, visual arts, music, religion, and  philosophy will be used.  Course meets multicultural graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: None

Proctored Exams: Final



  Textbooks

Required

  • Rzhevsky, Nicholas, trans. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe . An Anthology of Russian Literature from Earliest Writings to Modern Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 2005.
    • ISBN-978-0-7656-1246-5
  • Thompson, John. Russia and the Soviet Union: A Historical Introduction from the Kievan State to the Present. 8th Edition. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2018.
    • ISBN-978-0-8133-4985-5

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.

  Course Overview

This course combines Russian history with facets of national culture: literature, music, visual art, films, history of religious views, and philosophy. The goal is to create a three-dimensional view of the Russian Civilization: to explore its roots, follow its growing, and to see the fruits of its development. The course helps you develop a better understanding, a unique national mentality through reflections on the rich history of the country. This will be done through the study of Russian culture, which is an integral part of its national identity. This course allows you to assess the cultural contribution of Russia to World culture.

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe social, political, and economic forces that have created a culture.
  2. Describe characteristics of a culture.
  3. Articulate a sense of cultural identity in relation to the particular culture studied.

  Grading

Grading Scale

Grade Points Percent
A 369-410 90-100%
B 328-368 80-89%
C 287-327 70-79%
D 246-286 60-69%
F 0-245 0-59%

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (22) 85 21%
Homework Assignments (13) 65 16%
Midterm Exam 80 20%
Final Research Paper 80 20%
Final Exam 100 24%
Total 410 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion -- Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 1 3
Discussion 2 3
Discussion 3 3
Homework Assignment 1 4 Sunday
Homework Assignment 2 4

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 4 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 5 4
Discussion 6 3
Homework Assignment 3 6 Sunday
Homework Assignment 4 6
Homework Assignment 5 3
Proctor Information N/A

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 4 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 8 4
Homework Assignment 6 5 Sunday
Homework Assignment 7 5
Research Paper Topic Selection -

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 5 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 10 3
Homework Assignment 8 5 Sunday
Homework Assignment 9 5
Research Paper Bibliography -
Midterm Exam 80

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 4 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 12 3
Discussion 13 5
Homework Assignment 10 6 Sunday
Homework Assignment 11 5

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 14 5 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 15 4
Discussion 16 5
Homework Assignment 12 4 Sunday
Homework Assignment 13 4

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 17 5 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 18 4
Discussion 19 5
Final Research Paper 80 Sunday

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 20 4 Wednesday/Saturday
Discussion 21 4
Discussion 22 4
Final Exam 100 Saturday
Total Points: 410

  Assignment Overview

Discussions

Each week you will participate in a discussion that contains 2 - 3 questions.  Some questions may contain multiple parts, so be sure to read each question carefully.   For each discussion topic, you are expected to post your initial post by Wednesday at 11:59 pm Central Time (CT).  You must respond to at least two other classmates' posts no later than Sunday at 11:59 pm CT, except for Week 8, when the due date is Saturday at 11:59 pm CT.  You must complete the initial post and responses for the discussion to be considered completed.

Each initial post should be at least 170 words (citations are not included) and your response must be a minimum of 70 words per post.  You may select the citation method you wish to use, as long as you are consistent. 

Discussion posts and responses will be graded based on two criteria:

  • Level of Participation
  • Number and Timeliness

Your level of participation will determine if your post is substantive.  Substantive posts that help to advance the discussion clearly are of more value than comments just expressing agreement or disagreement.  In addition, you should not simply quote from a book, website, or classmate's answer.  You should look to provide a new perspective or vision to the issue, continue to develop an idea, or express support by providing additional resources.  If you do cite or quote from another source, do not forget to properly cite your resource and properly cite the source using quotations and links.  Wikipedia is not considered an acceptable source, but can be used as a starting off point for research.



Homework Assignments

During this course, you will write several responses referred to Homework Assignments.  These Homework Assignments will be submitted to the appropriate Dropbox folder.  Each Homework Assignment must be:

  • a total length of 1 page minimum, double-spaced
  • 12-point, Times New Roman
  • 1-inch margin
  • must be submitted as a MS Word Document (.doc/docx)

You submissions should showcase a good knowledge of the course material, historic backgrounds of the described event(s), and assigned readings. The submission should demonstrate a logical development of your arguments as well as clearly present your ideas.  The main criteria of the assessment will be the degree to which you have answered the question. This means that your submission should be convincing and contain selected examples from the studied culture and their logical analysis. For example, if you suggest some changes in St. Petersburg’s coat of arms, you need to provide your suggestions and rationalize them.  You can use additional materials (fiction, research articles, films, etc.) to support your ideas, as long as they are properly cited.

All Homework Assignments must be submitted to the appropriate Dropbox folder no later than Sunday at 11:59 pm CT the week they are due. 

Final Research Paper

As part of this course, you will write and submit a research paper by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT of Week 7.  You will select and submit a topic to the appropriate Dropbox folder by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT of Week 3.  You can select your topic from the list of offered topics in the Content area, use a variation of a topic included in the list, or create an original topic.  No matter how you select the topic, you must submit it for approval.

Research Paper Schedule

  • Week 3 - Research Paper Topic Selection
  • Week 4 - Research Paper Bibliography Submission
  • Week 7 - Research Paper Due

Your research paper must be a minimum of 750 words, excluding the title page and bibliography. In addition, your paper should be formatted with:

  • 1-inch margins
  • double-spaced
  • 12-point, Times New Roman or Arial font
  • Page numbers on the top of the pages

Your title page must include your name, the course title, research topic, as well as the thesis statement.  Your citation page can be based on the style you prefer (MLA, APA, or Chicago) as long as you are consistent with the style throughout the entire paper.  You should use at least four specific sources and a minimum of two of those sources should be outside the assigned course readings. Your research paper should be well organized and supported with the sources you select. Originality check will be used in the Dropbox folder, so you should summarize other sources without plagiarizing their work.  A plagiarism tutorial and quiz is available to help refresh your memory regarding plagiarism.

Your grade will depend on your ability to be convincing, which combines a solid knowledge of the analyzed material and your skills in applying a logical approach to that knowledge to prove your point of view and supporting your speculations with examples.  You are encouraged to compare some aspects of Russian culture with your own country’s (or European) history.  You should also use literature/music/visual art forms when appropriate.

The research paper should not be entirely based on history. Your work should include some material related to Russian cultural aspects (literature, visual and/or musical art, cinematography, etc.) showing cultural phenomena (reflections in contemporary culture) against a concrete historical period background. For example, if you are writing about the Stalingrad Battle, you will need to include the reflections of the event in Russian culture by analyzing a film, or a painting, or some monuments dedicated to this WWII battle.

Midterm Exam

The non-proctored Midterm Exam will consist of 10 short essays requiring detailed answers.  Each essay will be worth 6 - 11 points, depending on the difficulty of the question.  Make sure to ready each essay question carefully, as some may contain multiple questions to be answered.  An excellent response will answer all the questions, as well as provide good examples from the studied history and culture studied during Weeks 1 - 4 of the course to support the response.

The Midterm Exam will open on Thursday at 12:01 am CT and closes on Sunday at 11:59 pm CT of Week 4.  The exam is open book, so you may use your textbooks to formulate your answers.  However, you will only have 2 hours to complete the exam, so keep track of your time while searching for answers, checking your spelling and punctuation, and citing resources as necessary.  TurnItIn may be used to evaluate any essays that are believed to be plagiarized from the book or other resource.

Final Exam

The Final Exam is proctored and will consist of 10 short essays requiring detailed answers.  Each essay will be worth 6 - 11 points, depending on the difficulty of the question.  Make sure to ready each essay question carefully, as some may contain multiple questions to be answered.  An excellent response will answer all the questions, as well as provide good examples from the studied history and culture studied during the entire course.  Remember, this is closed book, so you will need to know the content.

Your Proctor Information should be submitted by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of Week 2.  More information regarding proctors can be found in Week 2 of the course.

The Final Exam will open on Tuesday at 12:01 am CT and closes on Saturday at 11:59 pm CT of Week 8.  You will have one attempt and 2 hours to complete the exam.

  Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Readings

Thompson:

  • Chapter 1, pp. 1–21
  • Chapter 2, pp. 23-24, 27-39
  • Chapter 3, pp. 50-51
  • Chapter 7, pp. 122-124
Tale of the Destruction of Ryazan” (excerpt from “Primary Chronicles”)
Introduction Discussion
Please, introduce yourself, to the instructor and other classmates in the Week 1 Discussion area, and tell us about your motivation for studying Russian Culture.
Discussion 1
How did geographical and climatic factors influence the unique Russian history, economy, and general mentality of people?
Discussion 2
What was the main impact of the Tatar-Mongol invasion on Russia’s historical fate? Do you see any “crease marks” of that period in modern Russia? Give an example.
Discussion 3
Why is the “Tale of the Destruction of Ryazan” considered the best piece of early national patriotic literature? What are the main themes of the story?
Homework Assignment 1

For this assignment, choose any Russian ancient city and give a summary of its history:

  • Shortly present it mentioning the most interesting landmarks.
  • Make your own brief “virtual” tour around the chosen city emphasizing its early history.
  • Give a minimum of 3 examples of important sites in the city, mentioning the reasons for your choice.

Here is a suggested list of the cities:

  • Alexandrov
  • Arkhangelsk
  • Astrakhan
  • Bogolyubovo
  • Borovsk
  • Dmitrov
  • Gorokhovets
  • Izborsk
  • Kaluga
  • Kholmogory
  • Kiev
  • Kolomna
  • Kostroma
  • Kozelsk
  • Moscow
  • Murom
  • Myshkin
  • Nizhny Novgorod
  • Novgorod Veliky (Novgorod the Great)
  • Pereslavl-Zalessky
  • Plios
  • Rostov Veliky
  • Ryazan
  • Rybinsk
  • Pskov
  • Smolensk
  • Staraya Ladoga
  • Staraya Russa
  • Suzdal
  • Tikhvin
  • Torzhok
  • Tver
  • Tutaev
  • Uglich
  • Veliky Ustyug
  • Vladimir
  • Vologda
  • Yaroslavl
  • Yuriev-Polsky
  • Zagorsk
  • Zaraysk
Homework Assignment 2

For this assignment, answer the following questions and utilize the resources provided:

  • How was the Russian medieval military history depicted in music and/or visual art?
  • What ideas do they emphasize?
  • Choose a minimum of 1 piece as an example to express your opinion.

Suggested sources:

In music: Opera “Prince Igor” by A. Borodin and his Symphony # 2 (“Heroic Symphony”); the operas “The Legend of Invisible City of Kitezh and Maiden Fevronia” by N. Rimsky-Korsakov; M. Musorgsky’s “Great Gate of Kiev”(from the series “Pictures at an Exhibition”); Cantata (Op. 78) “Alexander Nevsky” by S. Prokofiev; B. Tishchenko’s ballet “Yaroslavna”.

In visual art: V. Vasnetsov’s “After Prince Igor’s Battle with the Polovtsy”, “Bard Bayan”, “Three Bogatyrs”, “A Knight at the Crossroad”, “Knightly Galloping”, “Battle of the Slavs with Scythians”; V. Lopata, series of illustrations to the Tale of Igor’s Campaign”; I. Bilibin’s “Tale of Igor’s Campaign”; N. Roerich’s “Ancient Rus” paintings series and “Prince Igor’s Campaign”; M. Avilov. “The Battle of Peresvet with Chelubei on Kulikovo Field”; A. Bubnov “Morning on Kulikovo Field in 1380”; I. Glazunov’s “Prince Igor” and his other historical canvases (“Assault of the Town”, “Seeing off the Troops”, “After the Battle”…).

In cinematography: “Alexander Nevsky” by S. Eisenstein (1938); “Ivan the Terrible” by S. Eisenstein (1944); “Andrei Rublev” by A. Tarkovsky (1966).

Readings

Thompson:

  • Chapter 1, pp. 10-12, 14-21
  • Chapter 2, pp. 35-39
  • Chapter 3, pp. 40-49, 51-56
  • Chapter 4, pp. 63, 68, 73-74
  • Chapter 5, pp. 83-88
  • Chapter 7, p.129
  • Chapter 8, pp. 136-137, 144, 151
  • Chapter 16, pp. 364-365

Rzhevsky:

  • Cultural Beginnings, pp. 8–10;
  • The Emerging Self, pp. 41-43;
  • The Search for Identity, p. 88-89;
  • Subversions of Secularization, pp. 155-157;
  • “Boris and Gleb”, pp. 21–32, Notes, pp. 554-557;
  • “The Firebird and Princess Vasilisa”, pp. 99-103;
  • “Bezhin Meadow” by Ivan Turgenev, pp. 285–302, and Notes, p. 578.
Discussion 4
What are the two “facets” of the fairytale “The Firebird and Princess Vasilisa” that can be taken as an example of a classical European fairytale and an example of Slavic pagan beliefs? What lesson could a listener learn from this story?
Discussion 5
What is the phenomenon of Sobornost in Russian Orthodox Church philosophy? How does it make the Russian form of Christianity differ from its Western European form?
Discussion 6
How do you understand Ivan the Great’s concept of Moscow as the “Third Rome”? What reasons did he have to proclaim that idea? Can you feel any “echo” of that ideology in modern Russia?
Homework Assignment 3
What was moral code expressed in early religious Russian literature (“Boris and Gleb”)? Why do you think the brothers became the first Russian Orthodox Church saints?
Homework Assignment 4
How does Ivan Turgenev’s story “Bezhin Meadow” show the Dual Faith phenomenon in the Russians’ mind (an inter-mixture of Pagan beliefs and Christian faith)? Give a minimum of 1 example from the story. Do you know of any “remnants” of Paganism in American or/and European cultures?
Homework Assignment 5
What images in the pre-revolutionary and modern Russian state coat of arms are rooted in Ivan the Great’s ideology, and where did they come from?
Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Readings

Thompson:

  • Chapter 1, pp. 20-21
  • Chapter 2, pp. 36-39
  • Chapter 3, pp. 40-56
  • Chapter 4, pp. 64, 68, 73-75
  • Chapter 7, pp. 127-129
  • Chapter 8, pp. 135-137, 141-150, 152-153

Rzhevsky:

  • The Emerging Self, pp. 41–45;
  • Search for Identity, p. 85;
  • Subversion of Secularization, pp. 147-148;
  • “Borodino” by Mikhail Lermontov, pp. 132–135;
  • “Verses about Moscow” by Marina Tsvetaeva, pp. 447-448, and Notes, p. 579.
Discussion 7
How do two schools of thought that appeared in the 19th century – “Slavophiles” and “Westernizers” – reflect the ideological conflict in the society about the “Russian Way”? How did they answer the question “where to go?” – either together with Western Europe or finding their own original path? Can you find any traces of these schools in Russian political and social life of the 20th and 21st centuries?
Discussion 8
What were the historical and allegorical meanings of Moscow’s city coat of arms? Can you see any connection of its symbolism with the “Third Rome” concept?
Homework Assignment 6
What meaning of Moscow for the Russians does Mikhail Lermontov express in the poem “Borodino”? Give an example of patriotic poetry in American/European culture. Are its main motifs similar to “Borodino” or different from it?
Homework Assignment 7
What meaning, according to Marina Tsvetaeva, does Moscow have in Russian mentality? What traditional stereotypes of Moscow does she emphasize?
Research Paper Topic Selection

You must submit the topic for your research paper to the appropriate Dropbox folder by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT.  A list of possible topics can be found in the Content area of the course or you can come up with your own topic.

If you do not submit your topic by the due date, you will lose 5 pts. off your Final Research Paper grade.

Readings

Thompson:

  • Chapter 3, pp. 40-41, 53-56
  • Chapter 6, pp. 95-110
  • Chapter 8, pp. 145-148
  • Chapter 10, pp. 196-197 

Rzhevsky:

  • The Emerging Self, pp. 41–45;
  • Search for Identity, pp. 81-82;
  • New Aesthetic Languages, p. 404;
  • “The Bronze Horseman” by Alexander Pushkin, pp. 118-131, Notes, p. 574;
  • “Petersburg” (excerpt) by Andrei Bely, pp. 451–454; Notes, pp. 579-580
Discussion 9
After reading Alexander Pushkin’s poem “The Bronze Horseman,” what impression did you get? Does the author support Moscow’s or Petersburg’s historical path? Support your point of view using the text of the poem. Give a minimum of 2 examples.
Discussion 10
How can you explain the symbols included in St. Petersburg’s coat of arms? What are the ideologies determining the difference between the two capitols’ coats of arms? If you were an artist and were assigned to create/edit St. Petersburg’s or Moscow’s coat of arms, what would you add or change and why?
Homework Assignment 8

What are the similarities and differences between the depictions of the Bronze Horseman monument and St. Petersburg by Alexander Pushkin and Andrei Bely? Do they contain any contrasting ideas?

Homework Assignment 9
Compare the two main Russian cities, Moscow and St. Petersburg, from the point of view of their origin and importance for Russian history and mentality. What does each city symbolize for the Russians? Give example(s) of such ideological and symbolical opposition in American and/or Western European history and culture.
Research Paper Bibliography

You must submit your Final Research Paper Bibliography to the appropriate Dropbox folder by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT.

If you do not submit your Final Research Paper Bibliography by the due date, you will lose 5 pts. on your Final Research Paper.

Midterm Exam

The non-proctored Midterm Exam will consist of 10 short essays requiring detailed answers.  Each essay will be worth 6 - 11 points, depending on the difficulty of the question.  Make sure to ready each essay question carefully, as some may contain multiple questions to be answered.  An excellent response will answer all the questions, as well as provide good examples from the studied history and culture studied during Weeks 1 - 4 of the course to support the response.

The Midterm Exam will open on Thursday at 12:01 am CT and closes on Sunday at 11:59 pm CT.  The exam is open book, so you may use your textbooks to formulate your answers.  However, you will only have 2 hours to complete the exam, so keep track of your time while searching for answers, checking your spelling and punctuation, and citing resources as necessary.  TurnItIn may be used to evaluate any essays that are believed to be plagiarized from the book or other resource.

Readings

Thompson:

  • Chapter 1, pp. 14-17, 20-21
  • Chapter 3, pp. 44-46, 53, 56
  • Chapter 7, pp. 128-130
  • Chapter 8, pp. 144-148

Rzhevsky:

  • The Emerging Self, pp. 41-43;
  • The Search for Identity, pp. 79–90;
  • Subversions of Secularization, pp. 147-148, 157;
  • “Lefty” by Nikolai Leskov, pp. 338–367; and Notes, pp. 578-79
Discussion 11

What is the difference between Russian (icon, fresco) and Western European religious painting and/or the church architecture style? What was the historical reason for this difference? Is there any difference in the approach to the depicted object?

Discussion 12
If you were chosen as an editor of the Russian Religious Art Encyclopedia/ photo album/Internet site, what would you include there and why? Give a minimum of 2 examples.
Discussion 13
If it is true that any national literature reflects the national soul, can you find anything in the main character of “Lefty” by N. Leskov that could illustrate the Russian mentality, in general, and philosophy of Russian Christianity, in particular? What are the attractive features of the main character Lefty, and what is it that you might not like in him?
Homework Assignment 10
Why do you think N. Leskov’s tale “Lefty” was severely criticized by both liberal “left” (Westernizers) and conservative “right” (Slavophiles) wings of the writer’s contemporaries?
Homework Assignment 11

If you were to create the script of a bus tour around Moscow and/or St. Petersburg showing the most important memorials of the Russian World of Literature and/or Art, what places would you include in it and why?

Explain their importance for the national culture. Describe a minimum of 3 places.

Readings

Thompson:

  • Chapter 1, pp. 12-14, 18-20
  • Chapter 2, p. 36
  • Chapter 3, pp. 52-53
  • Chapter 4, pp. 68, 74
  • Chapter 5, pp. 78-85, 92-93
  • Chapter 6, pp. 104-110
  • Chapter 7, pp. 114, 117-122, 125-133
  • Chapter 8, pp. 140-144, 152-153
  • Chapter 9, pp. 155-173, 176-177
  • Chapter 10, pp. 179-198
  • Chapter 11, pp. 201-203, 208-209

Rzhevsky:

  • The Emerging Self, pp. 41-43;
  • Search for Identity, p. 82, 87;
  • “Felicity” by Gavriil Derzhavin, pp. 91–98,and Notes, pp. 573-74

"First Class” by Ivan Bunin; see the link to the story in the course content. 

“Threshold” by Ivan Turgenev; see the link in the course content.

Discussion 14
What image of an ideal ruler can you find in Gavriil Derzhavin’s “Felicity” dedicated to Catherine II? What virtues does he emphasize as most important for a perfect ruler? Can you give an example from Russian/ European/ American history of the important role of a prominent leader of the country?
Discussion 15
What were the political, economic and social grounds for establishing absolutism and the form of slavery known as serfdom in Russia? Why was it logical for Alexander II to abolish serfdom in the 1860s?
Discussion 16
In 1878 the jury declared the terrorist Vera Zasulich “not guilty.” She made an attempt of assassination on St. Petersburg’s Governor Trepov. She took revenge for his order to whip one imprisoned revolutionary for refusal to take off his hat in Trepov’s presence. Ivan Turgenev dedicated to her the poem “Threshold." The contemporaries considered the poem an anthem for a newly appeared social force in Russia. What formed those people’s mentality and what was the reason for their popularity?
Homework Assignment 12
Are there any connections/similarities between any of the main characters of “Boris and Gleb,” “The Bronze Horseman,” “Petersburg,” and “Lefty”? What are these similar features? What among those features make the character a typical representative of the Russian society of a certain historic period?
Homework Assignment 13
Ivan Bunin, the first Russian Noble Laureate, wrote stories about the pre-revolutionary times, like “First Class.” Can you see the source of the psychological tension in its content? Do you know any American/Western European literature/visual art/cinema piece reflecting social tension?
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Readings

Thompson:

  • Chapter 10, pp. 190-193
  • Chapter 11, pp. 215-216, 219-222
  • Chapter 12, pp. 225, 230-239, 246-247
  • Chapter 13, pp. 251-252, 259-260, 264

Rzhevsky:

  • Subversions of Secularization, p. 157;
  • New Aesthetic Languages, p. 406;
  • Thresholds: Soviet Culture and Beyond, pp. 455–465;
  • “We Live without Feeling” by Osip Mandelstam, p. 504;
  • “The Last Toast” by Anna Akhmatova, p. 506;
  • "Hamlet” by Boris Pasternak, p. 525.
Discussion 17
What was the Communist Party policy towards contemporary art and culture? What caused such strict persecutions towards the literature and art in opposition? Has there ever been any similar situation of censorship in Western Europe or/and America?
Discussion 18

What political message can be read “between the lines” in Anna Akhmatova’s poem?

Why did Osip Mandelstam’s poem “We Live without Feeling” bring him to a labor camp?

Discussion 19
Boris Pasternak was known as a brilliant poet and a writer, as well as W. Shakespeare’s translator. What in Pasternak’s poem “Hamlet” (a part of the poetry collection included in the Doctor Zhivago novel) shows his attitude towards the regime?
Final Research Paper

Your research paper must be a minimum of 750 words, excluding the title page and bibliography. In addition, your paper should be formatted with:

  • 1-inch margins
  • double-spaced
  • 12-point, Times New Roman or Arial font
  • Page numbers on the top of the pages

Your title page must include your name, the course title, research topic, as well as the thesis statement.  Your citation page can be based on the style you prefer (MLA, APA, or Chicago) as long as you are consistent with the style throughout the entire paper.  You should use at least four specific sources and a minimum of two of those sources should be outside the assigned course readings. Your research paper should be well organized and supported with the sources you select. Originality check will be used in the Dropbox folder, so you should summarize other sources without plagiarizing their work.  A plagiarism tutorial and quiz is available to help refresh your memory regarding plagiarism.

Your grade will depend on your ability to be convincing, which combines a solid knowledge of the analyzed material and your skills in applying a logical approach to that knowledge to prove your point of view and supporting your speculations with examples.  You are encouraged to compare some aspects of Russian culture with your own country’s (or European) history.  You should also use literature/music/visual art forms when appropriate.

The research paper should not be entirely based on history. Your work should include some material related to Russian cultural aspects (literature, visual and/or musical art, cinematography, etc.) showing cultural phenomena (reflections in contemporary culture) against a concrete historical period background. For example, if you are writing about the Stalingrad Battle, you will need to include the reflections of the event in Russian culture by analyzing a film, or a painting, or some monuments dedicated to this WWII battle.

Readings

Thompson:

  • Chapter 1, pp. 20-21
  • Chapter 2, pp. 38-39
  • Chapter 5, pp. 78-85
  • Chapter 7, pp. 125-126
  • Chapter 8, pp. 137-139, 142-143, 149-150
  • Chapter 9, pp. 157-161
  • Chapter 10, pp. 193-198
  • Chapter 11, pp. 201-211, 222-223
  • Chapter 12, pp. 229-238, 243-247
  • Chapter 13, pp. 274-276, 281-284
  • Chapter 14, pp. 288-291

Rzhevsky:

  • Thresholds: Soviet Culture and Beyond, pp. 455-459;
  • “Virgin Soil Upturned” by Mikhail Sholokhov, pp. 485–489, and Notes, p. 280
  • “Morning Exercise” by Vladimir Vysotsky, pp. 527-528.
Discussion 20
How did slavery, revolutions, and wars influence Russian society, its cultural and social development, and the national mentality? Can you show a Russian music/visual art/cinematography/ literature piece depicting those events? Use a minimum of 1 example; you can choose among the offered names below, or use your own findings.

Suggested list:

Music: Pyotr Tchaikovsky, Dmitry Shostakovich, Sergei Prokofiev;

Films: Sergei Eisenstein; Sergei Bondarchuk; Andrei Tarkovsky;

Painting: Isaak Brodsky, Alexander Deineka, Mitrofan Grekov, Pavel Korin, Yevsey Moiseynko, Ilya Repin, Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin, Vasily Perov, Arkady Plastov, Alexander Samokhvalov, Vasily Surikov, Vasily Vereshchagin; Soviet posters;

Sculpture: Vera Mukhina, Ivan Shadr, Yevgeny Vutcetich
Discussion 21
How does the chapter from Mikhail Sholokhov’s novel show the changing mentality of the farmers under the influence of Communist ideology? What do you think about the formula for reaching happiness/social peace/justice/equality popular in Soviet propaganda: “We should take everything from everyone and share among everybody”?
Discussion 22
Why, in your opinion, were Vladimir Vysotsky’s poetry and songs not welcome by the Communist authorities in “Stagnation” period? Can you see satire in his “Morning Exercise”?
Final Exam

The Final Exam is proctored and will consist of 10 short essays requiring detailed answers.  Each essay will be worth 6 - 11 points, depending on the difficulty of the question.  Make sure to read each essay question carefully, as some may contain multiple questions to be answered.  An excellent response will answer all the questions, as well as provide good examples from the studied history and culture studied during the entire course.  Remember, this is closed book, so you will need to know the content.

Your Proctor Information should be submitted by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of Week 2.  More information regarding proctors can be found in Week 2 of the course.

The Final Exam will open on Tuesday at 12:01 am CT and closes on Saturday at 11:59 pm CT of Week 8.  You will have one attempt and 2 hours to complete the exam.

  Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted. Failure to post an initial response by Wednesday at 11:59 pm CT of the appropriate week will be considered a late submission.

If Homework Assignments or the Final Research Paper is submitted late, without accetable reasons for the delay and without notification to the instructor about the possible delay, will earn 75% of the possible grade.   It is at the discretion of the instructor on if a reason or reasons are considered acceptable for late submission.  You will need to notify the instructor about the situation by email.  Failure to submit the paper topic or bibliography on time will result in a deduction of 5 points for each late submission correspondingly, from the total grade for your research paper.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.

  Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.