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Online classes

Effective: Late Spring 8-Week, 2017/2018

PSYC 330: Lifespan Developmental Psychology

Course Description

The study of physiological, environmental and interactive variables influencing human development from conception to death

Prerequisite: PSYC 101; PSYC/SOCI 175

Proctored Exams: Midterm



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Berk, L. (2017). Development through the Lifespan (7th ed). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
    • [ISBN-9781323825327]
    • Note: This course uses a VitalSource ebook. If you wish to have a print book, it can be ordered as a loose-leaf print on demand book through VitalSource. Please note there is a cost for this, and financial aid book vouchers cannot be used for this purchase. Once orders are placed, it can take approximately 5-7 business days for you to receive your print on demand book.

Recommended

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, (6th ed). Washington, DC: APA.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4338-0561-5]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

In this course you will examine human development from conception to death. You will analyze, discuss, and perform simple experimental tasks. You will critique articles found online and reenact simple developmental experiments. You will explore various news/current events sites to see how the theories of development can be applied to everyday life. Each week the class will focus on a different developmental stage and the related psychological theories.  


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the major concepts and theories in developmental psychology.
  2. Demonstrate an ability to understand the empirical primary source literature in the discipline
  3. Demonstrate the ability to produce written work consistent with disciplinary standards.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (15) 300 30%
Quizzes (8) 80 8%
Activity Paper 330 33%
Midterm Exam 120 12%
Final Exam 120 12%
Final Essays 50 5%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1: Course and Peer Introductions -- Wednesday
Discussion 2: Nature vs. Nurture Debate 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Quiz 1 10 Sunday
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3: Evaluating Toys designed for Infants and Toddlers 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 4: Temperament & the Goodness-of-Fit Model 20
Quiz 2 10 Sunday
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5: Early Intervention for Those at Risk 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 6: Educational Television 20
Activity Paper: Planning Guide 15 Sunday
Quiz 3 10
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7: Learning in School 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 8: Competitive School Activities 20
Quiz 4 10 Sunday
Midterm Exam 120
Activity Paper: Checklist 15
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9: Imaginary Audience, Personal Fable and Peer Pressure 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 10: Crisis Intervention 20
Article Review 50 Sunday
Quiz 5 10
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11: Examining the Psychological Impact of Attending College 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 12: Leaving Home 20
Activity Paper 250 Sunday
Quiz 6 10
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13: Double Standard on Aging 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 14: Midlife: The Prime of our Lives or Over the Hill? 20
Quiz 7 10 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15: Age Related Changes to the Five Senses 20 Wednesday/Saturday
Discussion 16: Death and Dying: Coming to Terms with Life 20
Quiz 8 10 Saturday
Final Exam 120
Final Essays 50
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Each discussion requires three posts: one original post and two peer responses. Your original post must be at least three paragraphs in length (three sentence minimum per paragraph). You will not be able to see other posts until your submit yours. Initial posts are due by Wednesday at 11:59 pm CT and responses are due by Sunday at 11:59 pm CT of their assigned week. 


Activity Paper

You will write a 1500-2000 word paper based on personal observations made on a child at play. In Week 3, you will submit a planning guide that identifies the desired age range and setting for observation. In Week 4, you will submit a checklist of detailed milestones to observe during observation. In Week 5, you will submit a review of a peer-reviewed article related to your study, using proper APA style. Your final paper is due at 11:59 pm CT Sunday of Week 6. 

For the final paper, no outside sources are required, but they must be cited if used. All submitted files will be checked for plagiarism using the TurnItIn plagiarism detector. Detailed information on this assignment is available in the Content area of the course. 


Quizzes

Each week, there will be a quiz assigned over the readings covered. Each quiz consists of 20 multiple-choice questions. There will be a 30 minute time limit. 


Midterm Exam

The midterm exam must be taken in a pre-approved proctored setting. The midterm opens at 12:01 am CT Tuesday and closes at 11:59 pm CT Sunday of Week 4. There are 60 multiple choice covering chapters 1-10 of the textbook. You will have 120 minutes to complete the exam. No books or notes may be used.


Final Exam

The final exam is not proctored. The exam opens at 12:01 am CT Wednesday and closes at 11:59 pm CT Saturday of Week 8. There are 60 multiple choice questions covering chapters 11-19 of the textbook. There is a 120 minute time limit.



Final Essays

There will be 5 essay questions to answer and submit to the Dropbox. The questions can be accessed in the Content area during Week 8. There is no time limit. All submitted files will be checked for plagiarism using TurnItIn's plagiarism detection tool.


Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Prenatal Development to Birth
Readings

Chapters 1, 2, and 3

Discussion 1: Course and Peer Introductions

Please introduce yourself to the class.

Here are some items to address:

  • Tell the class about yourself
  • What is your major?
  • What area of the country are you from?
  • What are your interests outside of college?
  • Any other information the class might find interesting.

Peer responses are not required, but are encouraged.

Discussion 2: Nature vs. Nurture Debate
  • Define and discuss the terms Nature and Nurture.
  • Define heritability and discuss how the estimates are obtained.
  • Define and discuss concordance rate and canalization.
  • Give an example where you think genetics would play a stronger role in development.
  • Give an example where you think environment would play a stronger role in development.

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Quiz 1

Covers chapters 1-3 of the textbook.

Week 2: Infancy and Toddlerhood
Readings

Chapters 4, 5, and 6

Discussion 3: Evaluating Toys designed for Infants and Toddlers

Conduct a field experiment to evaluate toys for infants and toddlers. Determine if a child in that age range has the perceptual capacity and the motor skills required to play with it effectively.

  • Go to your local toy store, or the toy section of a local store:
  • Find a toy that has been deemed specific for the age range of either infant or toddler.
  • Describe the toy and discuss what benefit a child might gain by playing with it.
  • Discuss the developmental stage that the infant or toddler is at during the age range described by your toy with respect to:
    • Motor skills
    • Perceptual abilities
  • Would you recommend this toy to a parent as a developmental aid?

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Discussion 4: Temperament & the Goodness-of-Fit Model

Examine the two distinct models of temperament, how it is measured, and the child rearing implications.

  • Read the article Infant Attachment: What We Know (in the Content area)
  • Use the site and the textbook to define temperament and list the structures of temperament.
    • Provide an example of each.
  • Define goodness of fit and relate it to the temperament of the child.
  • Describe how temperament and goodness of fit might influence attachment.
    • Provide an example.

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Quiz 2

Covers chapter 4-6 of the text.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Early Childhood
Readings

Chapters 7 and 8

Discussion 5: Early Intervention for Those at Risk
  • Discuss early interventions for at-risk pre-school children.
  • Discuss Project Head Start or programs in your area like it.
    • Explain who it was designed to help and how.
  • Describe and discuss one of the signs of a developmentally appropriate early childhood program.
  • Discuss the future of early interventions.
    • Is it an important program?
    • Should it be continued? Why, or why not?

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Discussion 6: Educational Television

Watch one hour of a children's program. If it is a half-hour program, watch two episodes or two different half hour programs.

While you are watching the program(s) keep a record of the number of aggressive/violent behaviors and the number of pro-social behaviors.

  • Identify the TV program and give a brief synopsis of it
  • Define aggressive/violent behavior and explain how it was depicted in the program(s)
  • Define pro-social behavior and explain how it was depicted in the program(s)
  • Discuss the socialization messages children might develop from watching these programs.
  • Determine if you would allow your child to watch this program or recommend these shows to other parents.

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Activity Paper: Planning Guide

Submit your planning guide to the Week 3 discussion area. See the Activity Paper guidelines in the Content area of the course for details. You must post your planning guide before you can see others' posts.

Quiz 3

Covers chapters 7 and 8.

Week 4: Middle Childhood
Readings

Chapters 9 and 10

Discussion 7: Learning in School
  • Explain what you consider an optimal class size for the middle childhood students under the following conditions:
    • Traditional classrooms
    • Open classrooms
    • Special education-for learning disabled and behavioral problematic children
    • Gifted students
  • Describe Vygotsky's theoretical approach to learning in the classroom.
  • Discuss the educational self-fulfilling prophecy and how it related to academic achievement of the student.

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Discussion 8: Competitive School Activities

Describe an example of a competitive school activity that a child might participate in during middle childhood.

  • Do you think children are affected by participating in these types of events?
  • Do these events encourage or discourage children?
  • What might the effects be on the child's self-concept and self-esteem?
  • How do these types of events affect a child in middle childhood?
  • Do these events encourage a mastery orientation or a learned-helplessness approach? How?

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Quiz 4

Covers chapters 9 and 10.

Midterm Exam

The proctored midterm covers chapters 1-10 of the text. 

Activity Paper: Checklist

Submit your checklist to the Week 4 discussion area. See the Activity Paper guidelines in the Content area of the course for details. You must post your checklist before you can see others' posts.

Week 5: Adolescence
Readings

Chapters 11 and 12.

Discussion 9: Imaginary Audience, Personal Fable and Peer Pressure
  • How do imaginary audience and personal fable relate to the adolescent's abilities to reflect on their own thoughts?
  • How do the roles of the adolescent's family and peers change during this stage?
  • Do these changes influence the adolescent's view of the imaginary audience and the personal fable? Why?
  • Are the imaginary audience and the personal fable normative and beneficial? Why?

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Discussion 10: Crisis Intervention

Adolescents sometimes experience life events more deeply and emotionally than other children or adults. Research and evaluate specific crisis intervention programs designed for at-risk or troubled youth.

Choose one of the following areas and research the questions listed below.

  • Crisis Hotline - telephone service for troubled teens to call anonymously
  • Walk-in Clinic - where troubled teens can get support
  • Youth center, community center, or Y with counseling or peer support groups
  • Local Hospital - does your local school provide a peer-counseling service for troubled teens?
  • Rape Crisis Center or Planned Parenthood - Do they have a hotline?
  • Local School - does your local school provide peer-counseling service for troubled teens?

Contact one of the local services above and determine the following information:

  • Who works there and how are they trained to help troubled teens?
  • What type of services do they provide?
  • How is confidentiality maintained? When might they have to breach the teen's confidentiality?
  • How are severe problems handled?
  • If peer counseling is provided, how are they trained?
  • How do troubled teens find out about the services provided?

Briefly discuss your results. Indicate whether you feel that the needs of the troubled teens would be adequately met. Would you feel confident if your son or daughter used these services?

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Article Review
Use the library databases to locate a peer-reviewed article on , 1) a positive or negative behavior that might be demonstrated by the child in your observation, 2) a developmental theorist, 3) development of  attachment, or 4) parenting styles. Write a concise summary of the article (100-150 words) and an opinion/reaction to the article (100-150 words). Include proper APA citation and reference of the source. 
Quiz 5

Covers chapters 11 and 12.

Week 6: Early Adulthood
Readings

Chapters 13 and 14

Discussion 11: Examining the Psychological Impact of Attending College

Research and evaluate specific psychological aspects of attending college.

  • In our textbook, the author states "the impact of college is jointly determined by the person's involvement in academic and nonacademic activities and the richness and diversity of the campus setting."
    • Do you agree that a college student's cognitive development is enhanced as described?
  • Do you think that residential students have an advantage over commuting students in the richness of the college experience?
  • How would you change your response for the online student?
  • How do you think the psychological aspect of online college attendance might differ?

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Discussion 12: Leaving Home
  • Visualize what it might be like for a young adult to leave the parental home for the first time. Describe this transition from dependent teen to responsible young adult.
  • Why do you think nearly half of adults return home for a brief period?
  • If you feel comfortable please share some of thoughts about when you moved out of your parental home, or about your future plans to leave home.
Activity Paper
For this activity assignment, visit a city park or other public area and observe a child at play. (If the weather is bad, any public place where you can safely observe a child will do, such as the mall or McDonald’s play area.) Observe one individual and write the entire paper on that one individual only. (Specific guidelines provided in the course.)
Quiz 6

Covers chapters 13 and 14.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Middle Adulthood
Readings

Chapters 15 and 16

Discussion 13: Double Standard on Aging

Use YouTube to watch some TV advertisements that depict people in different age groups. 

  • Identify the ad(s) that you watched
  • Do the ads show evidence of a double standard of aging?
  • Do males and females advertise different products?
  • What personal characteristics do males and females seem to display?
  • What is the role of the principle male or female?
  • Are the males and females represented as being androgynous?
  • Do you think the media should portray middle aged adults as being more androgynous then they currently are portrayed?
  • What could an advertiser do to minimize differences in the portrayal of middle-aged males and females?

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Discussion 14: Midlife: The Prime of our Lives or Over the Hill?
  • Examine the cognitive and personality changes that lead some people to refer to middle age as the "prime of life."
  • Why do you think many people view someone in mid-life as "over the hill?"
  • Why do you think there is a divergence between what we consider middle age and calling someone "over the hill" once they reach that age?
  • Has your view of aging changed as you have gotten older? How? 

This assignment is expected to cover the items listed above and should be a least 3 concise paragraphs in length.

Quiz 7

Covers chapters 15 and 16.

Week 8: Late Adulthood
Readings

Chapters 17, 18, and 19

Discussion 15: Age Related Changes to the Five Senses
  • Discuss the potential psychological effects of the limitation and/or loss of one of the sensory systems of the body.
  • Describe a modification that one might make to the environment to help an older adult cope with sensory changes.
  • Using the web, identify services available in your area for an older adult with declines in the sensory system.
Discussion 16: Death and Dying: Coming to Terms with Life
  • Discuss the five ideas that make up a realistic understanding of the death concept.
  • Define and describe death anxiety.
  • Identify, describe, and give an example of each stage of dying as outlined by Dr. Kubler-Ross.
Quiz 8

Covers chapters 17, 18, and 19.

Final Exam

There are 60 multiple choice and/or true-false questions in the Quizzes area of the course. Covers material from chapters 11 to 19.

Final Essays
There will be 5 essay questions to answer and submit to the Dropbox. The questions can be accessed in the Content area during Week 8. There is no time limit. All submitted files will be checked for plagiarism using TurnItIn's plagiarism detection tool.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

No late assignments are accepted unless they are pre-approved by the instructor. 

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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