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Effective: Late Spring 8-Week, 2017/2018

ENVS 352: *American Environmental Hist

Course Description

Analysis of America’s environmental history from the colonial period to the present.  This course considers the interrelationships between human society and the natural world in different bioregions of North America, focusing upon how ideas, institutions, and technologies have evolved over time.  It traces American Indian ecology, agricultural land use, natural resource conservation, and recent environmental activism.  It offers special attention to the significance of wilderness in the American past. Cross-listed as ENVS 352 and HIST 352.   

Prerequisite: Junior standing

Proctored Exams: Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Leopold, Aldo. A Sand County Almanac with Essays on Conservation from Round River. Ballantine.
    • [ISBN-978-0-345-34505-9]
  • Merchant, Carolyn, ed. Major Problems in American Environmental History (3rd ed.). Houghton Mifflin.
    • [ISBN-978-0-495-91242-2]
  • Cronon, William. Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England (20th Anniversary Edition (1st Revised Edition)). Hill and Wang.
    • [ISBN-978-0-8090-1634-1]
  • White, Richard. The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River (1st ed.). Hill and Wang.
    • [ISBN-978-0-8090-1583-2]

Recommended

  • Rampolla, Mary Lynn. (2016). A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (8th). Bedford Books.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4576-9088-4]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Welcome to American Environmental History! This is a history of America, but with nature or the natural environment playing a major role. Unlike many histories that focus on politics or economics, this one places the natural world in close proximity with human culture. This course provides an opportunity to explore how American history, particularly U.S. history, emerged as a result of the interplay between human activity and nature.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe the significant people, places, and events of American environmental history.
  2. Analyze the Columbian exchange between the Americas and Europe and its ecological legacies.
  3. Explain the environmental impacts of the Industrial Revolution on urban and rural communities.
  4. Analyze the progressive policies of conservation, preservation, and land management.
  5. Evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, and trends in the historiography of American environmentalism.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions 192 19%
Quizzes 158 16%
Book Review 150 15%
Scholarship Paper 250 25%
Final Exam 250 25%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introductions - Saturday
Syllabus Quiz 14
Quiz 1 18
Discussion 1: Topic and Responses 12 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 2: Topic and Responses 12
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Quiz 2 18 Saturday
Discussion 3: Topic and Responses 12 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 4: Topic and Responses 12
Proctor Information N/A Sunday
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Quiz 3 18 Saturday
Scholarship Paper Topic 25
Discussion 5: Topic and Responses 12 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 6: Topic and Responses 12
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Quiz 4 18 Saturday
Discussion 7: Topic and Responses 12 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 8: Topic and Responses 12
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Quiz 5 18 Saturday
Scholarship Paper Outline and List of Primary Sources 25
Discussion 9: Topic and Responses 12 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 10: Topic and Responses 12
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Quiz 6 18 Saturday
Discussion 11: Topic and Responses 12 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 12: Topic and Responses 12
Book Review 150 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Quiz 7 18 Saturday
Scholarship Paper 200
Discussion 13: Topic and Responses 12 Saturday/Sunday
Discussion 14: Topic and Responses 12
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Quiz 8 18 Thursday
Discussion 15: Topic and Responses 12 Thursday/Friday
Discussion 16: Topic and Responses 12
Final Exam (Proctored) 250 Saturday
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Participation in all discussions will improve performance on the papers and on the essay questions on the Final Exam.  Each week, remember to post both answers to questions and responses to other students in each of the two discussion forums: Primary Source Documents and Thinking Like a Historian.  Some questions have more than one part, so be sure to answer all questions and all parts of every question presented in both discussion forums. Not doing so will result in a significantly lower grade for that week’s participation. 

Each week, you should have at least four (4) contributions: initial answers to discussion questions in both forums and substantial responses to one or more students in both discussion forums.  All contributions should be direct, focused, original, substantial, supported, authentic, and clear. Of course, contributions should be on time, as well.  More detailed grading criteria may be found in the course Content area.


Quizzes

Each week you will complete a quiz based on that week’s assigned readings in your textbook by Merchant, Major Problems. The quiz is open-book; you may use the text to find the best answer.  Each quiz will consist of multiple choice or short answer questions worth a total of 18 points.  Your success here is based almost entirely on your willingness to dig in and work hard. Many of these same questions may reappear on the Final Exam. Further, the information gained through this activity should facilitate your success when posting discussion contributions.

Each week the quiz will be available in the Quizzes area from 8:00 AM Monday until 11:59 PM Central Time on Saturday.  However, only one attempt is allowed.  Once you begin the quiz, you must complete it.  In addition to the weekly quizzes, you will also need to complete the Syllabus Quiz during Week 1.


Final Exam (Proctored)

The closed-book/no notes, two-hour, computerized exam will consist of 50 multiple-choice questions earning 3 points per answer, and two essays worth 50 points each. Reviewing the weekly discussions and quizzes will assist in your test preparation. Your proctor will receive a password during Week 7 which will open the exam during the testing window (Monday 8:00 AM through Saturday at 11:59 PM Central Time. Before heading off to take the exam, be sure to contact your proctor/Columbia College official and verify the time, place, and the receiving of a Proctor Exam Form with your name on it. Mistakes happen; avoid one by calling a few days before heading off to take the exam. See the Proctor Policy below and the Proctoring Module in the Content area for more information. You must submit proctor information by the end of Week 2.


Book Review

The Book Review is a critical analysis of historical study. In this review, you will look critically/analytically at two excellent secondary works, Changes in the Land and The Organic Machine. The first looks at the Northeast during the colonial era; the second, the Pacific Northwest over the past 200 years.  Ultimately, the review explains why one book, more so than the other, was more helpful to you in recreating past interactions between humans and the natural environment, a major goal when writing environmental history.  The review should discuss with specificity and supporting details what you believe to be each book’s strengths and weaknesses regarding the presentation of environmental history. What did the author do, or not do, that impacted your ability to envision how past humans and the natural environment related?   Additional information vital to completing this assignment correctly is available in the Content area of the course.  Suggested length of this paper is 3-5 pages.


Scholarship Paper

You are required to write one scholarship paper for this course. When developing the paper, first, critically analyze primary sources and then research related secondary works. This project provides you with an opportunity to develop research and writing skills as well as critical thinking skills. You will analyze and synthesize historical writings to create a convincing narrative about a sufficiently narrowed topic.  Additional information vital to completing this assignment correctly is available in the Content area of the course.  Suggested length of this paper is 5-7 pages.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: What is Environmental History? & Fateful Encounters
Readings

Leopold:

“Foreword to Sand County Almanac”, xvii-xix;   Part IV: “The Land Ethic”, 237- 264.

Merchant:

“What Is Environmental History?”

“Native American Ecology and European Contact”

Chapters 1 & 2, pp. 1-64

Cronon:

“Preface”

“The View from Walden”

“Landscape and Patchwork”

“Seasons of Want and Plenty”

“Bounding the Land”

Chapters 1-4, pp. 3-81

Although the Book Review is not due until the end of the Week 6, it is a good idea to begin reading the two books well before then. Between Cronon and White, there are about three hundred pages. I recommend reading the above selection from Cronon because it supports this week’s themes, especially the chapters’ vivid portrayals of the interactions between Native Americans and the natural environment prior to the coming of the English.

Introductions

Introduce yourself on the appropriate topic in the Discussions area of the course, include in your introduction why you are taking this course, if this is your first online course and your interest in environment history. 

Syllabus Quiz

Complete the Syllabus Quiz available in the Quizzes area of the course. 

Quiz 1

Complete Quiz 1 available in the Quizzes area of the course. Quiz 1 will cover the assigned readings in Major Problems. 

Discussion 1: Topic and Responses

Primary Source Documents: Based on the primary source documents in Chapter 2 of Major Problems:

  • Compare and contrast how the Pueblo, Micmac, and Plains Indians interacted with their respective natural environments. Consider ideas, attitudes and practices, and how the natural environment impacted Native-American culture?
  • How did the arrival of the Europeans impact Native-American interaction with the natural environment?
Discussion 2: Topic and Responses

Thinking Like a Historian: Having read several essays by leading environmental historians (Chapter 1 in Major Problems & the Introduction in Nature’s Nation):

  • What do you understand “environmental history” to be?
  • Did these readings change your perception of this field of history? Explain.
  • Which essay was most helpful to you? Explain.
  • When writing history, historians have to consider the major cause or causes of change. Historians often disagree about the causes or forces of change. The Chapter 2 essays in Major Problems focus on the cultural transformation of Pueblo, Micmac and Plains Indians.
  • Discuss the causes of change assigned by these historians. Consider the actual practices of both Europeans and Native Americans.
  • Which of these essays or narratives did you find to be the most or the least persuasive in terms of providing a historical explanation based on causes? Explain.
Week 2: Colonial Farms & Independent Farmers
Readings

Leopold:

Part 3: “Natural History”, 202-210 & “Goose Music”, 226-233

Merchant:

“The New England Forest in the Seventeenth Century”

“Tobacco and Rice in the Colonial South”

Chapters 3 & 4, pp. 65-128

Cronon:

“Commodities of the Hunt”

“Taking the Forest”

“A World of Fields and Fences”

“That Wilderness Should Turn a Mart”

“Afterword” 

Chapters 5-8, pp. 82-185

Although the Book Review is not due until the end of the Week 6, it is a good idea to begin reading the two books well before then. Between Cronon and White, there are about three hundred pages. I recommend reading the above selection from Cronon because, like last week, it supports this week’s themes.

Quiz 2

Complete Quiz 2 available in the Quizzes area of the course. Quiz 2 will cover the assigned readings in Major Problems. 

Discussion 3: Topic and Responses

Primary Source Documents: Attitudes and beliefs about “nature” or the natural environment usually have practical consequences, especially when held by a practical people, the Puritans and their non-conformist neighbors. Based on the primary source documents in Chapter 3 of Major Problems:

  • How should one characterize early New England attitudes about the natural environment? Be sure to discuss the range of ideas about the natural world.
  • Having read the documents in Chapter 4 of Major Problems, compare (find similarities) and contrast the ecological attitudes and actions of New Englanders with those of the colonists and slaves growing tobacco and rice further south.
Discussion 4: Topic and Responses

Thinking Like a Historian: Some historians believe that economic forces (for instance, commerce and capitalism) shape or drive human history more profoundly than any other cause or force. In this week’s selection of essays (Chapters 3 and Chapter 4 in Major Problems), commercial ties to Europe are attributed with shaping much of early American history.

  • How did these commercial ties impact both the human and the natural environments? Be sure to discuss both the human and the non-human environments in both New England and the South.
  • Besides economic forces or causes in history, contrast how environmental causes or forces shaped human life in New England and in the Old South.
  • In these essays, are other historical causes or forces driving history? Explain.
  • Click on the image in the Content area overview to watch "Scripture of Nature," Part 1 of Ken Burns' series "The National Parks: America's Best Idea."  It's quite long (nearly two hours in length), but at least try to watch parts 1-4 and 10-13.  Referring to the video and your assigned readings, craft a response to these questions.
    • Who first popularized the idea of the National Parks?  Why are they referred to as “America’s Best Idea?”
    • What is “democratic” about the National Parks?  Was there a socio-economic or class component to those who favored National Parks? 
Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Commerce & Romance
Readings

Leopold:

Part 1: “February”, 6-19;  Part 3, “Wildlife in American Culture”, 211-222

Merchant:

“Farms and Cities in the Early Republic”

“Nature and the Market in the Nineteenth Century”

Chapters 5 & 6, pp. 129-203

White:

“Introduction”

“Knowing Nature through Labor”

“Putting the River to Work”

Chapters 1 & 2, pp. 3-58

Although the Book Review is not due until the end of the Week 6, it is a good idea to begin reading the two books well before then. Between Cronon and White, there are about three hundred pages. I recommend reading the above selection, as these chapters support and elucidate this week’s themes.

Quiz 3

Complete Quiz 3 available in the Quizzes area of the course. Quiz 3 will cover the assigned readings in Major Problems. 

Scholarship Paper Topic

Submit your topic and thesis statement as a Word document to the correct dropbox folder by 11:59 PM Central Time on Saturday.

Discussion 5: Topic and Responses

Primary Source Documents: Drawing on the primary source documents in Chapter 5 and Chapter 6 in Major Problems:

  • Discuss how various Americans in the years before the Civil War viewed nature and their relationship to nature.
Discussion 6: Topic and Responses

Thinking Like a Historian: The essays in Chapter 5 of Major Problems and Leopold consider the lifestyles of early Americans and the social and ecological transformations arising out of increasing commercial ties. Based on these readings:

  • Discuss America as an “undeveloped country.”
  • Discuss the significant steps or processes by which it had become a commercial giant. Consider how Americans managed this remarkable transformation.
  • What role did the natural environment play in this transformation?
  • The essays in Chapter 6 of Major Problems discuss how artists, writers, and African-American women thought about nature.
  • How do the depictions of beliefs and attitudes discussed in the historical essays compare and/or contrast with the depictions in the primary source documents. Explain.
Week 4: Extractive & Industrial America
Readings

Leopold:

Part 1, “April”, 25-36; Part 2, “Wisconsin”, 101-129

Merchant:

“The Cotton South Before and After the Civil War”

“Extracting the Far West in the Nineteenth Century”

Chapters 7 & 8, pp. 204-273

White:

“The Power of the River”

“Salmon”

Chapters 3 & 4, pp. 58-113

Although the Book Review is not due until the end of the Week 6, it is a good idea to begin reading the two books well before then. Between Cronon and White, there are about three hundred pages. 

Quiz 4

Complete Quiz 4 available in the Quizzes area of the course. Quiz 4 will cover the assigned readings in Major Problems. 

Scholarship Paper Outline and List of Primary Sources

The Outline & List of Primary Sources for your scholarship paper is due next week. You should begin working on this assignment now to ensure you have adequate time to complete it. 

Discussion 7: Topic and Responses

Primary Source Documents: Based on the documents in Major Problems (Chapters 7 & 8):

  • Discuss the extractive and exploitive nature of Southern agriculture and the activities of Europeans and Americans in the Far West. What were the ecological and social effects?
Discussion 8: Topic and Responses

Thinking Like a Historian: Based on the essays in Chapter 7 of Major Problems and Leopold.

  • How did the natural environment shape life in the Cotton South?
  • Are there other factors equally or more important in explaining the South’s economic and social institutions? Explain with specific information from your readings.
  • Over the years, some historians have emphasized conflict when writing their respective narratives; others have emphasized consensus or points of agreement. The essays in Chapter 8 of Major Problems employ the idea of “conflict” to characterize the European and American advance into the Far West.
  • Discuss this conflict.
  • In your opinion, does the theme of “conflict” paint an accurate or distorted portrait of the past? Explain.
Week 5: Hitting the Wall
Readings

Leopold:

Part 1, “October”, 58-70; Part 2, “Arizona and New Mexico”, 130-145

Merchant:

“Great Plains Grasslands Exploited”

“Resource Conservation in the Twentieth Century”

“Cities, Industries, and Pollution in the Twentieth Century”

Chapters 9, 10, & 12, pp. 274-350 & 390-426

Quiz 5

Complete Quiz 5 available in the Quizzes area of the course. Quiz 5 will cover the assigned readings in Major Problems. 

Scholarship Paper Outline and List of Primary Sources

Submit your Outline & List of Primary Sources for your scholarship paper as a Word document to the correct Dropbox folder by 11:59 PM Central Time on Saturday.

Book Review

Remember, the book review is due next week.

Discussion 9: Topic and Responses

Primary Source Documents: Based on the primary source documents in Chapter 9 of Major Problems and Leopold.

  • Discuss how the natural environment influenced and shaped the lives of settlers on the Great Plains, especially focus on how the natural environment imposed limits on the settlers.
  • Based on the documents in Chapter 12 of Major Problems and Chapter 13 in Nature’s Nation:
  • Discuss the human and environmental costs of industrial America, particularly in urban areas.
  • Based on the primary source documents in Chapter 10 of Major Problems:
  • What is your understanding of “Conservation?” Why was it advocated? Why was it opposed? 
Discussion 10: Topic and Responses

Thinking Like a Historian: Read the essays in Chapter 9 in Major Problems. Based on your own wide reading in environmental history:

  • Do you agree with William Cronin’s “Telling Stories About Ecology”? In other words, do environmental histories tend to be stories primarily driven by a moral purpose? Explain with examples from the previous two essays.
  • Having read Leopold:
    • Discuss how the natural environment of the West created new challenges to traditional American settlement patterns?
    • How did Americans respond to these challenges economically, socially, and politically? Discuss successes or failures?
  • Click on the image in the Content area overview and watch at least segments 1 and 3 of "Surviving the Dustbowl."  Referring to the video and your assigned readings, craft a response to these questions.
    • To what degree was the Dust Bowl a natural disaster, to what degree was it a man-made disaster? 
    • How important is it that much of the Dust Bowl was caught on photography or film?  How important were those media in making Americans aware of the Dust Bowl? 
    • Did the efforts of conservationists and reformers help or hinder America’s recovery from the Dust Bowl.  
Week 6: Back to the Wilderness
Readings

Leopold:

Part 4, “Wilderness”, 264-279

Merchant:

“Wilderness Preservation in the Twentieth Century”

“The Emergence of Ecology in the Twentieth Century”

Chapters 10, 11, & 13, pp. 352-389 & 427-467

Quiz 6

Complete Quiz 6 available in the Quizzes area of the course. Quiz 6 will cover the assigned readings in Major Problems. 

Scholarship Paper

Remember, the Scholarship Paper is due next week.

Discussion 11: Topic and Responses

Primary Source Documents: Based on previous readings and this week’s primary source documents (Chapter 11 in Major Problems):

  • Compare and contrast the ideals and goals of the “Wilderness Movement” with those of the “Conservation Movement.”
  • Based on the primary source documents in Chapter 13 in Major Problems and Leopold.
  • Explain the nature of ecology and its role in bringing environmental concerns into the American mainstream.
  • In addition, describe the influence of green political movements on environmental regulation and on concepts of morality. Be specific with examples drawn from the selections. 
Discussion 12: Topic and Responses

Thinking Like a Historian: Historians make no claim to objectivity when constructing and writing their respective narratives. In fact, some have argued for a purely subjective approach, thus justifying overt bias in the narrative. As Richard White writes, historians tell moral tales. Nevertheless, plenty of historians strive for a more objective, less personal approach. The idea of “Wilderness” is personally important to our three historians this week. In the essays from Chapter 11 in Major Problems:

  • Discuss the different perspectives offered about "wilderness" protection. To what extent do these essays express the moral commitments of their respective authors? Do the essays seem balanced and reasonably objective? Explain with details from the selections.
  • Discuss different models of the natural environment offered by ecologists. What are some practical, or at least philosophical, implications of these various models? In other words, accepting a specific ecological model of the way nature works, how should or might environmentally-sensitive people relate to the natural environment, using that model as a guide. Please be specific.
Book Review

Submit your Book Review as a Word document to the correct Dropbox folder by 11:59 PM Central Time on Sunday.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: A New Ethic
Readings

Leopold:

Part 1, “November”, 70-82; Part 3, “The Round River”, 188-210

Merchant:

“Water, Energy, and Population in the Twentieth Century”

Chapter 14, pp. 467-501

Quiz 7

Complete Quiz 7 available in the Quizzes area of the course. Quiz 7 will cover the assigned readings in Major Problems. 

Scholarship Paper

Submit your completed Scholarship Paper as a Word document to the correct Dropbox folder by 11:59 PM Central Time on Saturday.

Discussion 13: Topic and Responses

Primary Source Documents: Since the middle of the 20th century, unprecedented demands for water and energy have been made by a rapidly expanding American and world population. The documents in Major Problems reveal a wide range of responses to environmental challenges/problems.

  • Discuss this wide range of responses to the mentioned challenges.
Discussion 14: Topic and Responses

Thinking Like a Historian: Based on Leopold.

  • Discuss the strength and weaknesses of Federal environmental policy since the 1960s.
  • Most writers have a reason or purpose when writing. Historians usually do. Reading, critically, historical narratives involves, certainly, an attempt to understand the texts; it involves as well an attempt to understand why a narrative was written. What is the historian hoping to accomplish? This can be difficult when a historian's purpose is not explicitly stated in the narrative. In addition, our own biases often cloud our ability to make reasonable inferences. Nevertheless, reading history critically asks the questions: Why this topic? Why at that time? What does the historian want me to feel or do? In this assignment, read the essays in Chapter 14 in Major Problems. The essays discuss water, energy and environmental regulation.
  • As you critically read each essay, try to infer the historian's purpose in writing. Share your impressions with the class. Be sure to back up your opinions with specific details drawn from the selections. 
Final Exam

Remember, the Proctored Final Exam is next week.  Be sure to call your proctor to confirm a time, place, and the receipt of the Proctor Exam Form with your name on it.

Week 8: Nature on a World Stage
Readings

Leopold:

Part 4: “Conservation Esthetic”, 280-295

Merchant:

“Globalization: The United States in the Wider World”

Chapter 15, pp. 502-542

Quiz 8

Complete Quiz 8 available in the Quizzes area of the course. Quiz 8 will cover the assigned readings in Major Problems. Quiz 8 is due by 11:59 PM Central Time on Thursday.

Discussion 15: Topic and Responses

Primary Source Documents: During the 1960s, environmentalism emerged, along with a host of other social and political concerns, especially the treatment of women, minorities, and world peace/nuclear disarmament. These movements often supported each other in attempts to bring about change. Based on the primary source documents in Chapter 15 in Major Problems:

  • Discuss how these writers related or joined or merged concern for the natural environment with other moral, social, or political concerns.
  • Click on the image in the Content area to watch Carl Safina's TED Talk entitled "The Oil Spill's Unseen Culprits and Victims."  Referring to the video and your assigned readings, craft a response to these questions.
    • Do you think that the Gulf oil spill changed Americans’ attitudes about the use of fossil fuels in any major way?  Do you think that the responsibility for the extent of the oil spill and its impact lies more with the oil company or the government?
    • To what degree are Gulf residents responsible for oil spill?  Or, does the blame lie more evenly with all Americans.
Discussion 16: Topic and Responses

Thinking Like a Historian: Read the essays in Chapter 15 in Major Problems and Leopold. Both readings take us into the twenty-first century and present us with serious environmental challenges, and with recommendations for change.

  • Discuss international attempts to protect the natural environment, especially consider the role of the United States.
  • Based on the three essays in the final chapter of Major Problems, has anything changed about American interactions with the natural environment since colonial times? Explain. 
Final Exam (Proctored)

Complete the Final Exam by 11:59 PM Central Time on Saturday.  This exam is proctored and closed book.  No notes, books, or flash drives are allowed.  The exam will open on Monday at 8:00 AM and is available in the Quizzes area of the course. 



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Late assignments such as the Book Review and Scholarship Paper will be assessed an automatic 50% penalty unless there are extenuating circumstances. Points will be deducted for late Topics and Outlines/List of Primary Sources.

Late multiple-choice quizzes will not receive any credit unless there are extenuating circumstances.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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