Effective: Late Spring 8-Week, 2018/2019

ENGL 232: British Literature II

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  Course Description

Survey from Romatic period through the contemporary.

Prerequisite: ENGL 112

Proctored Exams: Midterm and Final



  Textbooks

Required

  • Black, Joseph, et al eds.. (2013). The Broadview Anthology of British literature: Concise Volume B (2nd). Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press.  
    • [ISBN-978-1-55481-133-5]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.

  Course Overview

In this course, we will discuss British literature from the late 18th Century to the present. This stretch of literary history is generally broken down into five literary periods: Romantic (1770-1832), Victorian (1832-1910), Modernist (1910-1945), Postcolonial (1945-1990), and Contemporary (1990-the present). Despite the dates given here, the ideas, values, and styles associated with each of these periods do reemerge and influence authors in later time periods. Literary history is based upon arguments proposed by scholars, and there is still lively debate about how we should understand these periods and the literature produced during them. One of the goals of this course will be not only to understand what defines these literary periods but also to question their boundaries and find connections across periods.

Throughout the course, we will read literature from a variety of genres including poetry, drama, and fiction and non-fiction prose. We will discuss the features of form and style that are associated with these genres and we will learn how different periods contributed to the development of these genres. In addition to thinking about literature through its form and style, we will read about the historical and cultural contexts in which these works were created and discuss how such contexts shape our understanding of meaning in literary texts.

Each week, you will be assigned to read both literary texts and short essays in the anthology textbook, The Broadview Anthology of British Literature. Discussion posts will ask you to analyze or discuss the literary texts or themes in the literature for the week. The essays assigned will help provide historical and cultural context for the readings. In order to be prepared to succeed on the discussion posts and quizzes or exams each week, you should complete all reading, including any lecture notes posted, before completing your assignments.

At three points in the semester, Weeks 2, 5, and 7, you will write literary analysis essays that argue for a particular interpretation of a literary work that we have read in the course. More specific guidelines for each essay are provided in the week they are assigned. You should use the writing, argumentation, and analysis skills developed in ENGL 112, Composition II, to complete these essay assignments. All essays should have a clearly stated thesis statement that makes a claim about interpreting one or more literary texts as well as quotations from the literary text(s) and analysis that supports and illustrates the thesis.

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify the periods of British literary history from Romanticism through the contemporary period.
  2. Identify some major and minor authors of these periods.
  3. Explain the historical and cultural contexts of literary works.
  4. Write argumentatively about literary works.
  5. Apply the terminology of literary study to interpret works in multiple genres.

  Grading

Grading Scale

Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (16) 160 16%
Papers (3) 400 40%
Midterm Exam 160 16%
Final Exam 160 16%
Quizzes (6) 120 12%
Total 1000 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion -- Wednesday
Discussion 1 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 2 10
Quiz 1 20 Sunday

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 4 10
Paper 1 100 Sunday
Quiz 2 20
Proctor Information N/A

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 6 10
Quiz 3 20 Sunday

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 8 10
Midterm Exam 160 Sunday

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 10 10
Paper 2 150 Sunday
Quiz 4 20

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 12 10
Quiz 5 20 Sunday

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 14 10
Paper 3 150 Sunday
Quiz 6 20

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15 10 Wednesday/Saturday
Discussion 16 10
Final Exam 160 Saturday
Total Points: 1000

  Assignment Overview

Discussions

You will have a non-graded Introduction Discussion and 16 graded discussions in this course.  You are expected to provide an initial post and respond to at least two classmates' posts in each discussion.

The non-graded Introduction Discussion is due by 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday of Week 1.  While this discussion is not graded, you are encouraged to introduce yourself to your classmates and your instructor.

With the 16 graded discussions, your initial post is due by 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday of each week. All initial posts should be 1 - 2 paragraphs in length (at least 100 words). 

Your two responses to classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday, with the exception of Week 8 when your responses are due by 11:59 pm CT on Saturday.  Each response should be approximately 1 paragraph in length (at least 50 words). 

You must use MLA formatting for all of your posts.  Additionally, all initial posts and responses should be substantive and should advance the discussion.  Responses such as "I agree." or "Nice point!" are not acceptable and will receive no credit.

Papers

You will write three papers in this course.  These papers are due in Weeks 2, 5, and 7.   Each paper will be graded on the basis of analytical and critical thinking skills, completeness, organization, correct spelling, correct formatting and citations, clarity, and neatness.

All papers are required to be formatted utilizing MLA format including:

  • double-spaced
  • 12-pt. Times New Roman font
  • 1-inch margins
  • citing quotations from the primary texts used for evidence and analysis
  • a works cited page

Additionally, each paper should be 3-5 pages in length or 1000-1250 words.

You must submit your papers to the appropriate Dropbox folder by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of the designated week.

Quizzes

There will be six quizzes during this course.  The quizzes will cover the assigned readings for each week.  These quizzes will test your understanding of literary terms and terms related to information about historical context.  You will be asked to identify examples of terms, analyze the literature for the week, and explain the meaning of language used in excerpts from the week's readings.

Each quiz will consist of 5 short-answer and 5 multiple-choice questions.  You will have 30 minutes and a one attempt to complete each quiz.

The quizzes will open at 12:01 am CT on Monday and must be submitted lo later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of the assigned week.

Exams

There will be two proctored exams in the course, a Midterm Exam (Week 4) and a Final Exam (Week 8). The exams will test your understanding of literary terms and terms related to information about historical context. You will be asked to identify examples of terms, analyze the literature for the last four weeks of the term, and explain the meaning of language used in excerpts from the readings. The essay question on the exam will also ask you to make comparisons between texts covered over the course of the entire term.

You will have 120 minutes (2 hours) and one attempt to complete each exam.

Your Proctor Information must be submitted by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday of Week 2. Information regarding proctors can be found in the Content area.

Midterm Exam

The proctored Midterm Exam will cover the material from Weeks 1 - 4. The exam will consist of a total of eight (8) questions: seven (7) short-answer questions and one (1) short-essay question. You will have two (2) hours and one (1) attempt to complete the exam. When you begin the exam, you should have 2 – 3 selections we have covered during the first four weeks of this course in mind to use as part of the essay response. You will be expected to provide general examples from memory.

For each of the short answer questions, answer the question with at least four sentences. Be sure to explain your answer and provide at least one example from this week’s reading to illustrate your point. Since the exam is proctored, you will not be able to use outside resources such as the textbook. However, you should be familiar enough with the readings to be able to speak to them and provide general examples from memory.

You must submit your exam no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Final Exam

The proctored Final Exam will cover the material from Weeks 5 - 8, with a cumulative essay question. The exam will consist of a total of eight (8) questions: seven (7) short-answer questions and one (1) short-essay question. When you begin the exam, you should have 2 – 3 selections we have covered during the first four weeks of this course in mind to use as part of the essay response. You will be expected to provide general examples from memory.

For each of the short answer questions, answer the question with at least four sentences. Be sure to explain your answer and provide at least one example from this week’s reading to illustrate your point. Since the exam is proctored, you will not be able to use outside resources such as the textbook. However, you should be familiar enough with the readings to be able to speak to them and provide general examples from memory.

You will have two (2) hours and one (1) attempt to complete the exam.

You must submit your exam no later than 11:59 pm CT on Saturday.

  Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Readings
  • "The Age of Romanticism," pp. 1-30.  
  • Biographical headnote for Anna Laetitia Barbauld, pp. 32-33, and the following poems:
    • "Washing Day," pp. 33-34
    • "The Rights of Woman," pp. 40-41
  • Biographical headnote for Charlotte Smith, pp. 43-44, and the following poems:
    • "Written in the Church-yard at Middleton in Sussex," p. 45
    • "Written September 1791, during a remarkable thunder storm, in which the moon was perfectly clear, while the tempest gathered in various directions near the earth," pp. 45-46
    • "On being cautioned against walking on a headland overlooking the sea, because it was frequented by a lunatic," p. 46
  • "The French Revolution," pp. 47-48.  
  • Biographical headnote for Mary Wollstonecraft, pp. 85-87, and the following essay:
    • "A Vindication of the Rights of Woman," pp. 87-102
  • Biographical headnote for William Wordsworth, pp. 136-138, and the following poems:
    • "Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey," pp. 145-147
    • "Resolution and Independence," pp. 165-167
  • Biographical headnote for Samuel Taylor Coleridge, pp. 277-279, and the following poems:
    • "The Eolian Harp," pp. 279-280
    • "This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison," pp. 294-295
Introduction Discussion
Introduce yourself to your other classmates and your instructor in the "Introductions" topic in the course’s Discussions area.
Discussion 1

The Romantics were strongly influenced by the ideas and principles espoused by the leaders of the French Revolution.

Choose one poem that we read this week and explain how it is “revolutionary” in content or in form.

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 2

Lyrical Ballads was a published book that contained poems by both William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. This text includes a Preface, written by Wordsworth, that argues that poetry should be written in language that is used by everyday people and should be “the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings.”

Choose one poem by either Wordsworth or Coleridge and explain how it reflects these ideas about poetry.  Include discussion of specific stylistic features of the poem to support your answer.

Quiz 1

Quiz 1 will cover the readings and Instructional Materials for Week 1.  The quiz will consist of 5 multiple-choice questions and 5 short-answer questions.  You will have 30 minutes and one attempt to complete the quiz.

Your quiz must be submitted no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Readings
  • "The Natural, the Human, the Supernatural, and the Sublime," pp. 227-229.   
  • Excerpt from: A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful, by Edmund Burke, Parts 2 & 3, pp. 236-238. 
  • Biographical headnote for Percy Bysshe Shelley, pp. 381-382, and the following poems:
    • "Mont Blanc," pp. 395-397.
    • "Ozymandias," p. 398.
  • Biographical headnote for John Keats, pp. 432-434, and the following poems:
    • "On Seeing the Elgin Marbles," p. 440.
    • "When I Have Fears that I May Cease to Be," pp. 440-441.
    • "Bright Star," p. 449.  
  • Biographical headnote for Mary Shelley, pp. 475-476.
  • “The Mortal Immortal” by Mary Shelley
  • “On the Medusa of Leonardo da Vinci, in the Florentine Gallery” by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Discussion 3

In his work, A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful, Edmund Burke explains two qualities that one often finds in art or nature: the sublime and the beautiful. In your own words, explain what Burke means by these two terms. What are the differences between the terms and the differences in how they make people feel? Give an example from your own experience where you think you have encountered something sublime and when you’ve encountered something beautiful, according to how Burke describes these terms. Find one example of either the sublime or the beautiful in one of the poems that we have read this week and explain how it fits Burke’s definition.

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 4

Ekphrasis refers to literature that is written in response to a piece of visual art. Two of our poems this week, P. B. Shelley’s "On the Medusa of Leonardo da Vinci," and Keats’s "On Seeing the Elgin Marbles," are examples of ekphrasis. Choose one of these poems and re-read it, jotting down the details that the poem gives you about the artwork. Then, look at the image of the artwork that inspired the poem to images or place in course where they are included already). Did reading the poem give you an accurate mental image of what the artwork looks like? If not, what qualities of the artwork does the poem choose to focus on? What is the relationship between the poem and the artwork? Do they complement each other? Does the poem use the artwork as the starting point to contemplate something else?

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Paper 1

Poetry Explication Essay

  • Choose a poem that you have read so far.
  • Analyze the form and style of the poem in a thorough, detailed manner.
  • Show how the formal features of the poem contribute to its meaning.

Submit your paper to the appropriate Dropbox folder no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Quiz 2

Quiz 2 will cover the readings and Instructional Materials for Week 2.  The quiz will consist of 5 multiple-choice questions and 5 short-answer questions.  You will have 30 minutes and one attempt to complete the quiz.

Your quiz must be submitted no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Readings
  • "Introduction to the Victorian Era,” pp. 498-541
  • “Work and Poverty,” pp. 570-572
  • Excerpt from Testimony before the 1832 Committee on the Labour of Children in Factories by Elizabeth Bentley, pp. 573-574
  • “The Place of Women in Society,” pp. 610-612
  • Excerpt from The Daughters of England: Their Position in Society, Character and Responsibilities by Sarah Stickney Ellis, pp. 612-613.
  • Excerpt from The Enfranchisement of Women by Harriet Taylor, pp. 615-618
  • Biographical headnote for Elizabeth Barrett Browning and “The Cry of the Children,” pp. 632-636
  • Biographical headnote for Elizabeth Gaskell and “Our Society at Cranford,” pp. 715-729
  • Biographical headnote for Robert Browning and “Porphyria’s Lover,” pp. 732-734
  • Biographical headnote for Augusta Webster and “A Castaway,” pp. 864-874
Discussion 5

Industrialization resulted in many changes to how Victorians of all classes lived and worked. Victorian writers frequently chose to use their writing, whether fiction, non-fiction, or poetry, to represent the effects of industrialization and move their readers to take action to advocate for reform. Choose one passage from one of the assigned readings where a Victorian writer represents the effects of industrialization. Explain how they represent the effects of industrialization. What response does this passage hope to elicit from a reader? What actions might this writer want to inspire their readers to take?

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 6

One important social issue that Victorians were concerned with was what they called “The Woman Question.” This phrase was an umbrella for all the debates concerning the nature, roles, and rights of women in British society. Choose one passage from one of the assigned readings where a Victorian writer represents or engages with what it means to be a woman or what rights and opportunities women should have. How does this writer represent what a woman is or should be? What behaviors, attitudes, or roles should a woman have according to this writer? Alternatively, how do ideas about femininity or masculinity influence the opportunities or expectations available to women in this text?

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Quiz 3

Quiz 3 will cover the readings and Instructional Materials for Week 3.  The quiz will consist of 5 multiple-choice questions and 5 short-answer questions.  You will have 30 minutes and one attempt to complete the quiz.

Your quiz must be submitted no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Readings
  • Biographical headnote for Dante Gabriel Rossetti, pp. 824-825, and the following poems:
    • “Sybilla Palmifera,” p. 835
    • “Lady Lilith,” p. 836
  • Biographical headnote for Gerard Manley Hopkins, pp. 899-900, and the following poems:
    • “God’s Grandeur,” p. 901
    • “Pied Beauty,” p. 901
  • Biographical headnote for Oscar Wilde, pp. 918-919, and the following essays:
    • “The Decay of Lying,” p. 923
    • Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray, p. 924
  • Biographic headnote for Bernard Shaw, pp. 1070-1071, and Mrs. Warren’s Profession, pp. 1071-1107
Discussion 7

Many late Victorian writers were concerned with how to define and describe beauty and how beauty affects the artistic observer. Choose one text that we have read and explain how this writer imagines beauty and its effects. Is the purpose of art to showcase beauty or does it have some other purpose? What qualities or values are associated with beauty and what sensations or emotions does beauty seem to evoke?

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 8

In Mrs. Warren’s Profession, Bernard Shaw seeks to illustrate how a mother and daughter come into conflict when their differing ideas about gender and morality come into conflict. Vivie, the daughter, is a “New Woman” who plans to make her way in the world through education and work. Her mother Kitty (Mrs. Warren), on the other hand, used her sexuality to make a comfortable life for herself and her daughter.

At the end of the play, why does Vivie reject relationships with both her mother and Frank? Is Vivie “doing the right thing,” as she claims? What does Mrs. Warren mean when she says, “But Lord help the world if everybody took to doing the right thing”?

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Midterm Exam

The proctored Midterm Exam will cover the material from Weeks 1 - 4. The exam will consist of a total of eight (8) questions: seven (7) short-answer questions and one (1) short-essay question. You will have two (2) hours and one (1) attempt to complete the exam. When you begin the exam, you should have 2 – 3 selections we have covered during the first four weeks of this course in mind to use as part of the essay response. You will be expected to provide general examples from memory.

For each of the short answer questions, answer the question with at least four sentences. Be sure to explain your answer and provide at least one example from this week’s reading to illustrate your point. Since the exam is proctored, you will not be able to use outside resources such as the textbook. However, you should be familiar enough with the readings to be able to speak to them and provide general examples from memory.

You must submit your exam no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Readings
  • “The Early Twentieth Century: From 1900 to Mid-Century,” pp. 1039-1068
  • Biographical headnote for Siegfried Sassoon, pp. 1138-1139, and the following poems:
    • “They,” p. 1139“
    • "Glory of Women,” p. 1139
  • Biographical headnote for Wilfred Owen, pp. 1142-1143, and the following poems:
    • “Disabled,” p. 1144-1145
    • “Dulce Et Decorum Est,” p. 1147
  • “War and Revolution,” pp. 1148-1156
  • Biographical headnote for William Butler Yeats, pp. 1168-1170, and the following poems:
    • “No Second Troy,” p. 1171
    • “Easter 1916,” pp. 1171-1173
    • “Sailing to Byzantium,” pp. 1180-1181
    • “Lapis Lazuli,” pp. 1182-1183
  • Biographical headnote for T. S. Eliot, pp. 1308-1310, and the following poems:
    • “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” pp. 1311-1313
  • Biographical headnote for W. H. Auden, pp. 1395-1396, and the following poems:
    • “[Funereal Blues],” p. 1397
    • “Musée des Beaux Arts,” p. 1401
    • “In Memory of W. B. Yeats,” pp. 1401-1402
    • “September 1, 1939,” pp. 1402-1404
Discussion 9

Compare the songs and poetry used for recruitment in the “War and Revolution” section to the poems by Sassoon and Owen. In what ways does the poetry of Sassoon and Owen seem to be responding to attitudes that glorified or romanticized warfare? How does their poetry work to counteract popular misconceptions about the experience of war?

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 10

One important question that Modernist poets struggled to respond to was, what should the role of art be in a world that increasingly feels violent, mechanized, and alienating? Choose one poem that we read this week that seems to address the role of art or the artist in the modern world and analyze how the stylistic features such as diction, imagery, and metaphor create meaning in the poem.

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Paper 2

Analysis Essay

Mrs. Warren’s Profession

Using the guidelines and prompts introduced during Week 4, write an essay in which you analyze Bernard Shaw’s play, Mrs. Warren’s Profession, using “close reading” analysis techniques. Your essay should include a thesis statement that presents a claim about the meaning or interpretation of the play. Body paragraphs should begin with topic sentences containing an interpretative point that supports the thesis and should include quotations from the play and thorough analysis of the meaning and significance of the quotations.

You must submit your paper to the appropriate Dropbox folder no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Quiz 4

Quiz 4 will cover the readings and Instructional Materials for Week 5.  The quiz will consist of 5 multiple-choice questions and 5 short-answer questions.  You will have 30 minutes and one attempt to complete the quiz.

Your quiz must be submitted no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Readings
  • Biographical headnote for James Joyce, pp. 1236-1238, and the following stories:  
    • “Araby,” pp. 1239-1241
    • “Eveline,” pp. 1242-1244 
  • Biographical headnote for Virginia Woolf, pp. 1185-1187, and the following:  
    • “The Mark on the Wall,” pp. 1187-1191
    • "A Room of One’s Own," Chapter 1, pp. 1203-1213 
  • “Woolf and Bloomsbury,” pp. 1232-1235
  • Biographical headnote for Katherine Mansfield, pp. 1298-1299, and the following story:  
    • “The Garden Party,” pp. 1299-1307 
  • Biographical headnote for Jean Rhys, pp. 1344-1345, and the following story:
    • “Let Them Call It Jazz,” pp. 1345-1353
Discussion 11

The title of Virginia Woolf’s essay, "A Room of One’s Own," refers to her argument that in order for a woman to be a successful writer, she needs private space and an income to allow her to pursue her work. The essay also examines the limits that women face in education and access to spaces of learning such as universities and museums. In what ways do the women writers studied this week engage with the challenges faced by women in the Modernist period? Provide examples from one or two texts that we have read this week and explain how these examples engage with the status of women.

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 12

One of the features that define Modernist fiction is its focus on characters and characterization. Modernists frequently argued that depiction of character was the primary goal of fiction. One way of depicting character was through stream-of-consciousness narration or extensive inner monologues that show not only what characters think but how they think. Choose one text that we read this week and explain how it represents the psychology of characters.

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Quiz 5

Quiz 5 will cover the readings and Instructional Materials for Week 6.  The quiz will consist of 5 multiple-choice questions and 5 short-answer questions.  You will have 30 minutes and one attempt to complete the quiz.

Your quiz must be submitted no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Readings
  • “The Late Twentieth Century and Beyond: From 1945 to the Twenty-First Century,” pp. 1405-1421
  • Biographical headnote for Chinua Achebe, pp. 1439-1440, and the following story:
    • “Dead Men’s Path,” pp. 1440-1442 
  • Biographical headnote for Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, pp. 1456-1457, and the following essay:
    • “Decolonising the Mind,” Chapters 3-5, pp. 1457-1462
  • “Literature, Politics, and Cultural Identity in the Late Twentieth and Early Twentieth Centuries,” pp. 1581-1582
  • “Colonization in Reverse,” by Louise Bennett, p. 1583
  • “White,” by Grace Nichols, pp. 1596-1597
  • “And If,” by Moniza Alvi, pp. 1600-1601
  • “The Terminal Clock,” by Pico Iyer, pp. 1601-1603
  • “Multiculturalism and the Road to Terror,” by Kenan Malik, pp. 1604-1607
Discussion 13

In his essay, "Decolonising the Mind," Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o explores how colonization affected the language, literature, education, and identity of the colonized. What conclusions does he reach about the influence of English language and literature upon colonized peoples? How might this influence the literature that writers in former colonized places may write?

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Discussion 14

Choose one short story, essay, or poem that we have read this week and explain how it represents or engages with the issues and concerns connected to post-colonialism or globalization. What does the writer want readers to understand about the effects of colonialism or globalization? What stylistic features does the writer use (for example, characterization, dialogue, description, metaphor, imagery, etc.) to represent the effects of colonialism or globalization?

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Paper 3

Modernist Short Story

Choose one of the short stories that we read during Week 6 and write a close reading analysis of how the text represents features of Modernism. Your essay should include a thesis statement that presents a claim about the meaning or interpretation of the story and how it relates to ideas or stylistic features associated with Modernism. Body paragraphs should begin with topic sentences containing an interpretative point that supports the thesis and should include quotations from the story and a thorough analysis of the meaning and significance of the quotations.

You must submit your paper to the appropriate Dropbox folder no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Quiz 6

Quiz 6 will cover the readings and Instructional Materials for Week 7.  The quiz will consist of 5 multiple-choice questions and 5 short-answer questions.  You will have 30 minutes and one attempt to complete the quiz.

Your quiz must be submitted no later than 11:59 pm CT on Sunday.

Readings
  • Biographical headnote for Philip Larkin, pp. 1427-1428, and the following poems:
    • “Church Going,” pp. 1429-1430
    • “Talking in Bed,” p. 1430
    • “Annus Mirabilis,” p. 1431
    • “This Be the Verse,” p. 1431
    • “Aubade,” p. 1433
  • Biographical headnote for Seamus Heaney, pp. 1448-1449, and the following poems:
    • “Digging,” p. 1449
    • “The Grauballe Man,” pp. 1450-1451
    • “Punishment,” pp. 1451-1452
  • Biographical headnote for Eavan Boland, pp. 1525-1526, and the following:
    • “The Woman Poet: Her Dilemma,” pp. 1528-1532
    • “Domestic Violence,” 1533-1534
    • “Inheritance,” p. 1534
  • Biographical headnote for Zadie Smith, pp. 1568-1569, and the following:
    • “The Waiter’s Wife,” pp. 1569-1577
    • “Joy,” pp. 1577-1580
Discussion 15

Many of the authors that we read this week are responding to social, cultural, or political changes happening at the time of their writing. Choose one poem or story that seems to engage with themes of social or cultural change. Explain how this text represents change and how it affects people in the United Kingdom or Ireland.

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Saturday.

Discussion 16

Although the authors for this week are writing in the contemporary period, they still look back to British authors who have come before them for influence and inspiration in form and themes. Choose one story or poem from the reading list this week and one text from earlier in the course that seem to share similar stylistic or thematic elements. In your post, compare these two texts and explain how the older text might serve as a precursor or influence on the latter.

Your Initial Post is due at 11:59 pm CT on Wednesday.  Your responses to two classmates' posts are due by 11:59 pm CT on Saturday.

Final Exam

The proctored Final Exam will cover the material from Weeks 5 - 8, with a cumulative essay question. The exam will consist of a total of eight (8) questions: seven (7) short-answer questions and one (1) short-essay question. When you begin the exam, you should have 2 – 3 selections we have covered during the first four weeks of this course in mind to use as part of the essay response. You will be expected to provide general examples from memory.

For each of the short answer questions, answer the question with at least four sentences. Be sure to explain your answer and provide at least one example from this week’s reading to illustrate your point. Since the exam is proctored, you will not be able to use outside resources such as the textbook. However, you should be familiar enough with the readings to be able to speak to them and provide general examples from memory.

You will have two (2) hours and one (1) attempt to complete the exam.

You must submit your exam no later than 11:59 pm CT on Saturday.

  Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

No late assignments will be accepted.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.

  Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.