Skip to main content

Search Bar Icon Close Menu

Online classes

Effective: Late Spring 8-Week, 2017/2018

ENGL 107: Preparatory English Composition

Course Description

Extensive reading and writing practice with emphasis on paragraph organization and development leading to multiple-paragraph essays and engagement with outside ideas and texts. Systematic review of grammar, mechanics, and sentence structure, integrated into the reading and writing process. Based on a grade C or higher in the course, students may proceed to ENGL 111. Placement by ACT English Score or by SAT Writing Score: students whose ACT English Score is from 1 to 17 (or whose SAT Writing Score is from 300-420) will be placed in ENGL 107. Offered Fall and Spring.

Prerequisite: Placement by ACT English Score or by SAT Writing Score: students whose ACT English Score is from 1 to 17 (or whose SAT Writing Score is from 300-420) shall be placed in ENGL 107.

Proctored Exams: Midterm



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Scarry, Sandra and Scarry, John. The Writer's Workplace with Readings: Building College Writing Skills. 8th Ed. Boston: Wadsworth, 2014.
    • ISBN-978-1-285-06384-3
  • Aaron, Jane E.. The Little, Brown Compact Handbook. 9th Ed. with MLA update. New York: Pearson Education, 2016.
    • ISBN-978-0-12-458634-2

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

This course provides a review of grammar and basic writing skills to help prepare you for more advanced writing courses needed for college.  We will work on selecting a topic, developing a thesis, and providing supporting details as well as work on many of the grammatical problems encountered in the writing process, such as subject-verb agreement, sentence fragments and run-on sentences, verb tense, and capitalization and punctuation. You will have plenty of hands-on practice with writing, building from short paragraphs to full essays.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To engage in critical thinking exploration while applying these skills to collegiate-level English reading and writing tasks
  • To systematically review grammar, mechanics, and sentence structure as integrated into the reading and writing process.
  • To provide integrated reading and writing instruction for students who require preparation to succeed on college-level reading and writing assignments

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate skills in identifying the context, audience, and purpose of college level-texts.
  • Demonstrate strategies for reading and understanding college-level texts.
  • Demonstrate an ability to think about texts critically both during and after reading.
  • Demonstrate an ability to analyze college-level texts for stated or implied main ideas and for supporting details.
  • Demonstrate pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading techniques for college-level writing.
  • Demonstrate an ability to think critically about one's own writing.
  • Expand vocabulary using various methods.
  • Write clear, correct, and concise sentences and paragraphs.
  • Produce well-developed, coherent, and unified college-level paragraphs and essays.
  • Identify, evaluate, integrate, and document sources properly.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (16) 230 23%
Writing Assignments (9) 480 48%
Quizzes (6) 90 9%
Proctored Midterm Exam (1) 100 10%
Final Exam (1) 100 10%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1: Introduction Statement 10 Sunday
Discussion 2: Plagiarism 10
Dropbox 1: Practice Writing in the Third person 30
Dropbox 2: Paying Attention to Look-Alikes and Sound-Alikes 30
Quiz 1 15
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3: Evaluating Supporting Details in Essays 15 Sunday
Discussion 4: Thinking About Peer Review 15
Dropbox 3: Supporting Details 50
Quiz 2 15
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5: Analyzing the Process Essay 15 Sunday
Discussion 6: Peer Review the Process Paragraph (Rough draft post due Friday) 15
Dropbox 4: Process Paragraph 50
Quiz 3 15
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7: Analyzing Tools of Definition in Essays 15 Sunday
Discussion 8: Peer Review the Definition Paragraph (Rough draft post due Friday) 15
Dropbox 5: Definition Paragraph 50
Proctored Midterm Exam 100
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9: Considering the Role of Illustration in Essays 15 Sunday
Discussion 10: Reviewing Introductions and Conclusions 15
Dropbox 6: Introduction and Conclusion Practice 50
Quiz 4 15
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11: From Paragraph to Essay 15 Sunday
Discussion 12: Practice Using Examples to Develop a Point 15
Dropbox 7: Thesis and Preplanning Due 60
Quiz 5 15
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13: Reducing Wordiness 15 Sunday
Discussion 14: Peer Review the Illustration Essay (Rough draft post due Friday) 15
Dropbox 8: Final Illustration Paper 100
Quiz 6 15
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15: MLA Discoveries 15 Saturday
Discussion 16: Thinking about MLA and APA Styles 15
Dropbox 9: Paraphrasing and Quoting Correctly 60
Final Exam 100
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussion Assignments

Responses should comport with common English practices. 

Your initial response to the discussion question should be a full paragraph of 8-10 sentences; all of the sentences should support your main claim, your topic sentence.  The entire paragraph should be written in your own words, without quoting any other sources.  If you are writing about a reading from our text, be sure to include the author and title in the first sentence or two so others know what piece you are referencing.

Your responses to others’ posts should also be well developed, fully explaining your response to the classmates’ posts.  Make responses that add to the conversation and take it further; simply posting “I agree” or “good job” does not help develop ideas.  For maximum learning and point benefits, respond to at least two students’ posts.

Peer Review discussions should include your rough draft as well as two specific questions that your peer can focus on.  Use these questions to get the kind of help you need in your writing; you might ask classmates to keep an eye on spelling, to help eliminate the second-person, or to watch that all verbs are in the same tense.  When you respond in peer review, choose a draft no one has responded to yet.  Read through it and answer the other learner’s questions while keeping an eye on the specific skills we have been working on for that week; also note any smart tactics or especially effective language the other learner used in his/her draft.

You are expected to use correct grammar throughout your writing.  Discussion responses with gross grammatical and punctuation errors will be assessed a penalty.  Take advantage of the spell check option available through the online course environment.  Also, avoid using “cell phone texting” as a style of writing within this course. 


Quizzes and Exams

You will have six brief quizzes designed to test your knowledge of the grammar rules. Focus your study on weak areas. You may use the books as resources when taking the quizzes. Quizzes should be completed by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. You will have 40 minutes for each quiz.

The midterm exam is proctored, so you will have to arrange for an acceptable proctor. You will not be able to use notes, books, or other sources during the midterm exam. The midterm will primarily be multiple-choice and will cover grammar up to Week 4 within the course.

The final exam will take place during Week 8. No proctor is necessary for this exam. You may use books or notes to complete the test. The final is comprised of a mixture of grammar, punctuation, and writing rules, putting information into MLA and APA styles, and writing two complete and coherent paragraphs. The Little, Brown Compact Handbook is necessary for some points on the final exam, so be prepared with that as you begin the test.


Dropbox Writing Assignments

You will have a number of opportunities to practice writing in this course, beginning with sentences and paragraphs and building toward a full essay.  All paragraphs and essays must be submitted to the Dropbox in .doc, .docx, or .rtf format in order to receive a grade.


*Note

Please note that assignments submitted for a previous class will not receive credit. You are expected to do new and original work in each course.  Review the plagiarism tutorial located in the Content area of our D2L classroom.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Introduction, capitalization, look-alikes and sound-alikes
Readings

The Writer’s Workplace

• Chapter 2, “Recognizing the Elements of Good Writing”
• Chapter 13, “Learning the Rules for Capitalization and Punctuation”
• Chapter 15, “Paying Attention to Look-Alikes and Sound-Alikes”
• Pp. 566-574, “Managing Information from Sources”

The Little, Brown Compact Handbook

• pp. 333 - 337, “Capital Letters”

Discussion 1: Introduction Statement

Introduce yourself to me and to your classmates. Take time to add information about your hobbies, family, educational goals, favorite books, etc. Remember that your post should be one full, cohesive paragraph of at least 8-10 sentences that support one topic sentence. Respond with substance to at least two others’ posts.

Discussion 2: Plagiarism
  • Visit Purdue’s Online Writing Lab and read “Avoiding Plagiarism.”
  • Read the discussion of plagiarism in The Writer’s Workplace (“Managing Information from Sources”).
  • Review the plagiarism tutorial located in the Content area of the class and take the plagiarism quiz in the Quizzes section.
  • After reading about plagiarism, provide your definition of plagiarism and your advice on how to avoid it. Respond with substance to at least two others’ posts.
Dropbox 1: Practice Writing in the Third person
  1. After reading about voice in Chapter 2, complete Activity 5 on pages 24-25. Rewrite the paragraph in the third person.
  2. On the same page, answer this question:Why should almost all of your college essay / paragraph assignments be written in third person?
Dropbox 2: Paying Attention to Look-Alikes and Sound-Alikes

Turn to Chapter 15 in The Writer’s Workplace. For this assignment, create a coherent paragraph using the look-alike and sounds-alike words within this chapter. The idea is to get you thinking about words that are frequently used incorrectly. 

This should be one continuous paragraph with a unifying topic sentence and related supporting sentences. You must have at least eight to ten sentences. You must use at least 20 to 30 different look-alike or sound-alike words. You must underline each of the look-alikes or sound-alikes you have used and use the words correctly.

To see a sample for formatting the page, see page 482 in the Compact Handbook (note the identifying information in the top corner, the title, and double-space the page).
Post this assignment to the appropriate Dropbox. If you do not have your books yet, you can search for a list of look-alike and sound-alike words online to use in your paragraph.

Quiz 1
Capitalization, punctuation, and look-alike and sound-alike words
Week 2: Supporting details in paragraphs; subjects and verbs in sentences
Readings

The Writer’s Workplace

  • Chapter 1, “Gathering Ideas for Writing”
  • Chapter 16, “Working with Paragraphs: Topic Sentences and Controlling Ideas”
  • Chapter 17, “Working with Paragraphs: Supporting Details”
  • Chapter 3, “Finding Subjects and Verbs in Simple Sentences”
  • Chapter 4, “Making Subjects and Verbs Agree”
  • Read two of the following three essays:
    “Going to School Behind the Iron Curtain” (501)
    Michael Nava. “Gardenland” (617)
    W. Bruce Cameron, “A Day at the Theme Park.” (615)

The Little, Brown Compact Handbook

  • pp. 189 - 195, "The Sentence"
Discussion 3: Evaluating Supporting Details in Essays

Describe one of the two essays you read. Provide the essay’s title and its main idea in the topic sentence of your paragraph. List some of your favorite details from the essay and explain how the details support the main idea. Explain any details that seemed out of place, and explain why they did not support the main idea.

When you respond to classmates, choose one who wrote about the other essay you read. Respond with substance to at least two others’ posts.

Discussion 4: Thinking About Peer Review
What is the purpose of peer review? Who are your peers? When is peer review useful and effective, and what can cause peer review to feel like a waste of time? Begin your response with a guiding topic sentence to answer these questions, and then respond with substance to at least two others’ posts.
Dropbox 3: Supporting Details

Write a single paragraph in which you use very specific details to help support your topic sentence. Please follow the directions below when writing your paragraph. Your topic can be chosen from ideas on the Content page of the course.

After choosing a broad topic, make a list of all of the possibilities you can think of within that topic, then choose one of those to write about.

Jot down all of the details that make that specific topic special. Create a single sentence that defines what your paragraph will be about (See Topic Sentences: Chapter 16). Then, write a paragraph that is between 8 and 10 sentences in length. The emphasis should be on adding as much detail to your topic idea as possible, but remember to stay on point. Use MLA formatting for the page. To see a sample, see page 482 in the Compact Handbook (note the identifying information in the top corner, the title, and the double-space formatting).

After reading the peer review of your classmates, revise your paragraph and submit your final draft with the brainstorming lists in the appropriate Dropbox.

Quiz 2
Finding subjects and verbs in sentences and subject/verb agreement
Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Fragments, phrases, and run-ons, and the process paragraph
Readings

The Writer’s Workplace

  • Chapter 5, “Understanding Fragments and Phrases”
  • Chapter 8, “Correcting Fragments and Run-ons”
  • Chapter 21, “Developing Paragraphs:Process Analysis”
  • Read the following essays:
    • Russell Baker, “Slice of Life” (632)
    • Mortimer Adler, “How to Mark a Book” (635)

The Little, Brown Compact Handbook

• pp. 264 – 273, “Sentence Faults”

Discussion 5: Analyzing the Process Essay

Choose one of the two essays assigned for this week and analyze it (break it into parts). Use Chapter 2 (pages 19 – 29) to assist you in your response.

In your paragraph, explain what the essay is about, and the author’s thesis or controlling idea. Share whether you think this is an informational or directional process essay and why. List some of the transitional words used in the essay and share some others that the author could have used.

When you respond to classmates, choose one who wrote about the other essay you read. Respond with substance to at least two others’ posts, providing responses to his/her analysis, including your own findings.

Discussion 6: Peer Review the Process Paragraph (Rough draft post due Friday)

Post your process paragraph draft to the discussion area for peer review. To ensure you get feedback you can use, you must include two specific questions to guide your readers in what to pay attention to in your writing. The questions should be specific to your paragraph. Focus on the skills we are practicing this week on sentence structure. For example, I might ask, “Are there any sentences that are confusing?”

Then, respond to another’s draft. Be sure to answer their questions and be on the lookout for the skills we worked on this week: sentence fragments, run-ons, and transitions between steps.

Dropbox 4: Process Paragraph

Write a single paragraph describing a process in which steps must be taken in order to achieve a specific outcome. You may choose to write either a directional or informational process paragraph; choose one of the two topics in the Content area. After choosing a topic, make a list of all of the steps necessary, list any materials necessary, and determine if any can be left out or reordered.

Begin with a single sentence that defines what your paragraph will be about. (See Topic Sentences: Chapter 16) Then, write a paragraph that is between 8 and 10 sentences in length, using the ideas in your brainstorm. The emphasis should be on describing each step clearly, with transitions from one step to the next. Remember to stay on point. Use MLA formatting for the page. To see a sample, see page 482 in the Compact Handbook (note the identifying information in the top corner, the title, and the double-space formatting).

After reading the peer review of your classmates, revise your paragraph and submit your final draft with the brainstorming lists in the appropriate Dropbox.

Quiz 3
Sentence fragments, phrases, and run-on sentences
Week 4: Combining sentences and writing definition paragraphs
Readings

The Writer’s Workplace

  • Chapter 6, “Combining Sentences Using Coordination”
  • Chapter 7, “Combining Sentences Using Subordination”
  • Chapter 24, “Developing Paragraphs: Definition and Analysis”
  • Read the following essays:
    o Lee Herrick, “What is This Thing Called Family?” (657)
    o Peter Gibbon, “Giving Students the Heroes They Need” (654)
Discussion 7: Analyzing Tools of Definition in Essays

Choose one of the two essays assigned for this week and analyze it (break it into parts), using the following questions. Use Chapter 2 (pp. 19 - 29) to assist you in your responses.

In your paragraph, explain what the essay is about, and the author’s thesis or controlling idea. Share which paragraph you think gives the clearest definition of the term being explored and why this particular paragraph is effective at supporting the main idea. Explain what you could add to the essay to help define the term and support the main idea.

When you respond to classmates, choose one who wrote about the other essay you read. Respond with substance to at least two others’ posts, providing responses to his/her analysis, including your own findings.

Discussion 8: Peer Review the Definition Paragraph (Rough draft post due Friday)

Post your definition paragraph draft to the discussion area for peer review. To ensure you get feedback you can use, you must include two specific questions to guide your readers in what to pay attention to in your writing. The questions should be specific to your paragraph. Focus on the skills we are practicing this week on sentence structure. For example, I might ask, “Are there any sentences that I could revise to make stronger?”

Then, respond to another’s draft. Be sure to answer their questions and be on the lookout for the skills we worked on this week: strong sentence structure.

Dropbox 5: Definition Paragraph

    Write a paragraph that will define one of the two options given in the Content area.

    • brainstorm the identifying characteristics of the term (see p. 448)
    • brainstorm using negation (see p. 449)
    • brainstorm at least three possible examples you could use to help define the term (see p. 450)
    • brainstorm historical or cultural ideas about the term that might help the reader understand it

    When you write the paragraph, you will not have space to use all of those ideas, so focus on only the strongest ideas in your brainstorm to define your term in only one paragraph.

    Use MLA formatting for the page. To see a sample, see page 482 in the Compact Handbook (note the identifying information in the top corner, the title, and the double-space formatting).
    After reading the peer review of your classmates, revise your paragraph and submit your final draft with the brainstorming lists in the appropriate Dropbox.

    Proctored Midterm Exam
    This exam will cover grammar topics from the first four weeks of class. You must take this exam by appointment with an approved proctor. It is a multiple-choice test and can be found in the Quizzes section of our course; only your proctor will have the password. You will not be able to use any texts, notes, or outside resources during the exam.
    Week 5: Understanding pronouns; introductions and conclusions
    Readings

    The Writer’s Workplace

    • Chapter 9, “Choosing Correct Pronouns”
    • Chapter 26, “Moving From the Paragraph to the Essay”
    • "Writing an Effective Concluding Paragraph" (pp. 487 - 489)
    • Read the following essays:
      o Ellen Goodman, “Friendless in North America” (626)
      o Scott Russell Sanders, “Fidelity” (629)

    The Little, Brown Compact Handbook

    • Pp. 51 – 54, “Writing introductory and concluding paragraphs”
    • Pp. 240 – 248, “Agreement of Pronoun and Antecedent,” “Reference of Pronoun to Antecedent”

    Online Resources (in the course Content)

    • “A Proper Introduction.” Guide to Grammar and Writing. Capital Community College Foundation. Website.
    Discussion 9: Considering the Role of Illustration in Essays

    Choose one of the essays assigned for this week and analyze it (break it into parts), using the following questions. Use Chapter 2 (pp. 19 - 29) to assist you in your responses.

    In your paragraph, explain what the essay is about, and the author’s thesis or controlling idea. Share two of the examples the author used and fully explain how the two examples helped prove or strengthen the thesis statement.

    When you respond to classmates, choose one who wrote about the other essay you read. Respond with substance to at least two others’ posts, providing responses to his/her analysis, including your own findings.

    Discussion 10: Reviewing Introductions and Conclusions

    What are the strongest tips in the readings this week about introduction and conclusion strategies? Which of the strategies do you think will help you the most? Why?

    Your paragraph should reflect some knowledge of the reading from both the textbook and additional resources in the Content area. Be sure to respond with substance to at least two others’ posts.

    Dropbox 6: Introduction and Conclusion Practice

    (Note: If you are thinking ahead, you can start thinking about the illustration essay due in Week 7 and use your possible topic for this exercise. It could later be revised and applied to your essay.)

    Introduction Practice

    1. Turn to page 485, Exercise 11 in The Writer’s Workplace
    2. Having just reviewed the information on the various introduction styles, compose your own introductory paragraph, using one of the nine patterns found in the Workbook.
    3. Be sure to add the Pattern Number you used to create the introduction.
    4. Make your introduction 8-10 sentences long.

    Conclusion Practice

    For the introduction you just created, write a concluding paragraph, based on the effective styles noted on pages 487 - 489 of The Writer’s Workplace. Make your conclusion 8-10 sentences long.

    Quiz 4
    Pronouns and antecedents
    Week 6: Mastering verb tenses; drafting ideas for the essay
    Readings

    The Writer’s Workplace

    • Review Chapters 16 and 17 on Topic Sentence, Controlling Ideas, and Supporting Details;
    • Review Chapter 26, “Moving from the Paragraph to the Essay”
    • Chapter 12, “Using Verb Tenses Correctly”

    The Little, Brown Compact Handbook

    • Pp. 14 – 27, “Thesis and Organization,” and “Drafting”
    • Pp. 224 - 227, “Verb Voice”
    Discussion 11: From Paragraph to Essay
    Please answer the following questions in a full paragraph:
    1. Do you find the body of the essay or the introduction easier to write? Explain your answer.
    2. What is the purpose of a thesis statement?
    3. Why are transitions so important to a successful essay?
    4. Respond with substance to at least two others’ posts
    Discussion 12: Practice Using Examples to Develop a Point

    You are planning a full illustration essay, so in this discussion, practice illustrative writing by making a paragraph that uses examples to develop the main idea. What kinds of books or magazines do you enjoy reading? Make your topic sentence a general statement about what you like to read and then develop the rest of the paragraph with either many examples or one long, fully explained example that illustrates your main claim (the topic sentence).

    Respond with substance to at least two others’ posts; practice using examples in your responses, too.

    Dropbox 7: Thesis and Preplanning Due
    Choose one of the topics provided for your illustration essay. If you have another topic idea, get it to me by Wednesday for prior approval. This week you should begin brainstorming what greater point your essay will uphold (your thesis), and how you can prove it using examples or illustrations. You can brainstorm by making clusters, a list, or a free writing page. Think about as many examples as you can to help explain and prove your thesis, and fill in some details, too. Later you will choose only the most effective and relevant ideas in your brainstorm to include in your final draft. Place your full brainstorm and proposed thesis statement in the Dropbox.
    Quiz 5
    Verb tenses, active and passive verbs
    Course Evaluation
    Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
    Week 7: Adjectives, adverbs, parallelism, and final essay
    Readings

    The Writer’s Workplace

    • Chapter 10, “Working with Adjectives, Adverbs, and parallel structure”
    • “Wordiness: In Writing, Less Can be More!” (pp. 257- 263)

    Online resources (in the Content area)

    • Kilborn, Judith. “Strategies for Reducing Wordiness.” Literacy Education Online. The Write Place. St. Cloud State University. 2000.
    • Sheey, Geoff. “5 Paragraph Essay Construction.” SlideShare.
    • “The Five Paragraph Essay.” Guide to Grammar and Writing. Capital Community College Foundation.
    Discussion 13: Reducing Wordiness
    Often a beginning writer will use ten words where two will do. What are some of the strategies you can employ to help you reduce wordiness in your own writing? Respond with substance to at least two others’ posts.
    Discussion 14: Peer Review the Illustration Essay (Rough draft post due Friday)
    This topic is designed to assist you with writing and editing skills. When you have completed your rough draft of the illustration paper, post it. Include two or three questions about your writing that will help your reviewers give you feedback, such as, “Please help me double check my spelling,” or “How can I make my topic sentence stronger?” or, “Are there any places that are confusing that I should clarify?” Then, review another student posting and offer guidance for the questions. Watch also for voice: Did the writer use the same first or third person voice all the way through? Are all of the verbs in the same tense? Feel free to keep an eye on the skills we have worked on in the class: pronouns, wordiness, and complete sentences are a few.
    Dropbox 8: Final Illustration Paper

    Because this is a longer paper, please get started early enough to make revisions based on reviewers’ feedback in the Discussion area. Plan ample time for writing and revising. Submit your final draft in the appropriate Dropbox.

    Please take the time to review the assigned chapters for detailed guidance on essay construction.

    Write a 5-6 paragraph essay based on the guidelines found in Chapter 28 (pages 422 – 425). You will find a list of possible topics in the Content area; you may decide which topic best suits you. Use MLA formatting for your essay. To see a sample, see page 482 in the Compact Handbook (note the identifying information in the top corner, the title, and the double-space formatting). Post your rough draft in the Writer’s Workshop within the Discussion. Post your final draft in the appropriate Dropbox.

    Quiz 6
    Adjectives, adverbs, parallel structure
    Week 8: Summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting material
    Readings

    The Little, Brown Compact Handbook

    • Thoroughly read pp. 422-430, then scan through to page 445
    • Thoroughly read p. 445 , then scan through to page 478
    • Read pp. 478-490, paying attention to marginal notes, citations, and the notes in the Works Cited
    • Read “Using summary, paraphrase, and quotation” pp. 391-396
    Discussion 15: MLA Discoveries
    What two things did you learn from looking through this section on MLA? Name and explain two things another classmate has not already talked about, and include the page numbers you refer to in parentheses with correct punctuation (see page 486). Write a fully developed paragraph. Respond with substance to at least two others’ posts.
    Discussion 16: Thinking about MLA and APA Styles
    MLA is generally used for the humanities, and APA style is often used in the social sciences. Look around at the APA section of the Handbook starting on page 492 and going through the sample APA paper that starts on page 513. What differences do you see between the two styles? As you go through your college classes, how can this Handbook help you? Remember to write a full paragraph of your own, and respond with substance to at least two others’ posts.
    Dropbox 9: Paraphrasing and Quoting Correctly

    Go to the Content area in D2L for Week 8. There are two paragraphs and sources listed there. For the first paragraph, take a one sentence quote from it and write a paragraph of your own. Place the one sentence quote somewhere within your paragraph, using correct quotation marks with correct MLA text citation and a correct MLA Works Cited entry. Next, simply copy and paste the same paragraph you wrote, but use APA style to cite your sources and make a correct APA style reference list at the end.

    Look at the second paragraph provided in the Content area. This time, paraphrase the paragraph by putting it all into your own words and your own sentence structure. Be sure to avoid plagiarizing by using correct in-text citations and a correct MLA works-cited. Review pp. 391-396 for paraphrasing information.

    Copy and paste your paragraph, but now make the in-text citation appropriate for an APA paper. Make an APA final reference list using all the necessary information. There will be four paragraphs total.

    Final Exam
    This exam will cover all grammar you have reviewed, two full paragraphs, and MLA and APA citations. Please take the time to review the previously assigned chapters prior to taking the exam. There will be multiple choice, paragraph writing, and composing citations on this exam. This is NOT a proctored exam, so have your Handbook ready.


    Course Policies

    Student Conduct

    All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

    Plagiarism

    Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

    Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

    All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

    Non-Discrimination

    There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

    Student Accessibility Resources

    Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

    Online Participation

    You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

    Attendance Policy

    Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

    Cougar Email

    All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

    Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

    Late Assignment Policy

    An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

    No late discussion posts will be accepted.

    Quizzes and Exams: I will not reopen quizzes and tests. Please make sure to take these exams before the deadline.

    Papers: Dropbox assignments submitted late will receive a one letter grade deduction up to one week past the due date. Dropbox assignments will not be accepted beyond one week past the deadline.

    Course Evaluation

    You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

    Proctor Policy

    Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


    Additional Resources

    Orientation for New Students

    This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

    Technical Support

    If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

    Online Tutoring

    Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

    Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


    +

    Request info