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Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

SOCI 325: *Quantitative Research Methods

Course Description

Study of applied research in the behavioral sciences, with an emphasis on design, methodology, results interpretation and theory building. Quantitative approaches are addressed, employing both parametric and nonparametric statistics. Cross-listed as PSYC/SOCI 325.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC/SOCI 324; junior standing

Proctored Exams: Midterm



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Gravetter. F. J. & Forzano, L. B.. (2016). Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences (5th). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.
    • [ISBN-978-1-305-10413-6]

Recommended

  • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4338-0561-5]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Research design is a required course for the social sciences (e.g., psychology, sociology, criminal justice) because behavioral scientists use the scientific method to study human behavior. This course will introduce you to the skills that you will need to evaluate and conduct research in the social sciences. This course focuses primarily on quantitative research methods, employing both parametric and nonparametric statistics. You will become a good consumer of research as you explore research design, methodology, results interpretation, and theory building. Over the duration of this course, you will develop a research proposal by selecting a research topic, generating a hypothesis, reviewing research literature that is relevant to your topic, and designing a method that will test your hypothesis. You will also learn about important ethical considerations in planning and conducting studies.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Generate an idea for a research project based on a review of primary peer reviewed literature.
  2. Describe and explain how statistics answer research questions.
  3. Describe and explain the ethics of quantitative research using human and non-human subjects (including Columbia College's Protection of Human Subjects Committee (PHS) - called Internal Review Board (IRB) at most institutions).
  4. Produce a quantitative research proposal demonstrating professional writing in APA format and style, critical analyses and synthesis.
  5. Describe and explain reliability and validity issues in quantitative research.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (15) 300 30%
Research Proposal (4 Parts) 300 30%
Exams (2) 400 40%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion -- Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 1: Induction, Deduction, and the Scientific Method 20
Discussion 2: Writer's Workshop - Hypotheses 20
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3: Operational Definitions 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 4: Informed Consent 20
Research Proposal Part 1: Hypothesis and References 20 Sunday
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5: Sampling Issues 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 6: Reliability and Validity 20
Research Proposal Part 2: Conceptualization 30 Sunday
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7: Between Subjects Deisgn 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 8: Writer's Workshop - References 20
Midterm Exam (Proctored) 200 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9: Research Design 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 10: Within-Subjects Design 20
Research Proposal Part 3: Introduction and Methodology 50 Sunday
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11: Statistical Analysis 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 12: Writer's Workshop - Research Proposal Peer Review 20
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13: Correlational and Descriptive Research 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 14: Descriptive or Simulation Research 20
Research Proposal Part 4: Final Draft 200 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15: Self-Reflection 20 Wednesday/Saturday
Final Exam 200 Saturday
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

In this course, you will participate in two types of discussions, (1) discussion and application of the readings and (2) writer’s workshop for peer review of your proposal. ​Your initial posts should answer all discussion questions thoroughly and are due by 11:59 pm C.T. Wednesday of each week. In addition, at least two thoughtful response posts to your classmates are required per discussion and are due by 11:59 pm C.T. Sunday of each week. Discussions 1 through 15 are worth 20 points each.  A grading rubric will also be available in the course Content area.

Initial Posts 

Your initial posts should be written in your own words and supported by evidence from the textbook and/or secondary resources. All sources must be properly formatted using APA or ASA in-text citations and a reference list. Information obtained from websites should also be properly cited and referenced. Writing is expected to be at a college-level with correct grammar and punctuation, containing at least two paragraphs and a minimum word count of 250 words or more, excluding quoted material. 

"Must Post First" Requirement

Discussion settings will not allow you to read others' posts before you have submitted your initial post. Any attempt to violate the “Must Post First” requirement will result in a zero for the post. This includes editing posts after submission, deleting posts and reposting, or otherwise attempting to alter a previously submitted post. Questions regarding this requirement must be directed by e-mail to the instructor.

Response Posts 

Your responses to others’ posts should also be well developed, fully explaining your response to the classmates’ posts, containing at least one paragraph and a minimum word count of 100 words or more, excluding quoted material. Write responses that add to the conversation and take it further; simply posting “I agree” or “good job” does not help develop ideas. For maximum learning and point benefits, respond to at least two students’ posts. 

Writer's Workshop 

Writer’s Workshop discussions will help you prepare your research proposal.  In Week 1, you will post 5 possible topics for your proposal. During Week 4, you will post a draft of your reference page, and during Week 6, a draft of your research proposal. Writer’s Workshop discussions will provide you an opportunity to engage in the peer review process, which is very important in the social sciences.

Plagiarized and Recycled Posts

You will receive a zero for recycled posts from this session and previous sessions. Students who attempt to use their classmates’ work in their posts will also receive a zero. This applies both to primary posts and secondary comments.


Research Proposal

This course requires 3000 words total of formal writing, not including title pages, abstract pages, and reference pages. Over the duration of this course, you will develop a research proposal totaling 8 to 12 pages. The proposal is broken into four parts, as described below. Length varies by assignment. 

Grading rubrics are available in the course Content area. All parts must be structured with clear language and proper spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Write from the third person point of view, using active voice (e.g., no use of we, our, us, you, your). Quotations are not permitted. All sources must be properly formatted using APA or ASA in-text citations and a reference list. Psychology students should use APA-style consistently throughout the course; sociology students should use ASA-style consistently throughout the course. 

Part 1: Hypothesis & References (20 points)

  • 1 to 2 pages
  • 7 sources (APA or ASA style)
  • Due by 11:59 pm C.T. Sunday of Week 2.
  • You must take the plagiarism Tutorial and Quiz before the Week 2 Dropbox will open!

Part 2: Conceptualization (30 points)

  • 2 to 3 pages (500 to 750 words)
  • Due by 11:59 pm C.T. Sunday of Week 3.

Part 3: Methodology (50 points)

  • 5 to 7 pages (1,250 – 1,750 words)
  • Due by 11:59 pm C.T. Sunday of Week 5.

Note: You will also submit a rough draft of your Research Proposal for Peer review on Wednesday of Week 6 (Discussion 12).

Part 4: Final Draft of Research Proposal (200 points)

  • 8 – 12 pages (2000 to 3000 words)
  • Due by 11:59 pm C.T. Sunday of Week 7.
  • Should contain the following:
    1. abstract 
    2. introduction (problem or objective, literature review, conceptualization, identification of variables, hypothesis)
    3. research design 
    4. participants 
    5. ethical considerations 
    6. measurement/equipment 
    7. data collection methods  
    8. data analysis and expected results  
    9. references (APA/ASA style)

Plagiarism

You will receive a zero for plagiarized or recycled material from this session and previous sessions. Students who attempt to use their classmates’ work in their papers will also receive a zero. You will be able to see the originality report for each assignment, and resubmit a revised file as long as you do so before the assignment deadline. It is in your best interest to complete each assignment early, giving adequate time for revisions if required.


Exams

There will be 2 exams worth 200 points each. The Midterm Exam is a proctored, closed-book exam due by 11:59 pm C.T. Sunday of Week 4. The Final Exam is not proctored and is due by 11:59 pm C.T. Saturday of Week 8. You will have 2 hours and only one attempt to complete each exam. You should study in advance and budget your time wisely. The exams consist of four parts, as described below. Each part should take no longer than 30 minutes to complete.

  • Part 1: 14 multiple choice questions @5 points each = 70 points
  • Part 2: 5 short answer question @10 points each = 50 points
  • Part 3: Essay 1 @40 points
  • Part 4: Essay 2 @40 points 


Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: The Scientific Method
Readings
  • Chapter 1: Introduction, Acquiring Knowledge and the Scientific Method
  • Chapter 2: Research Ideas and Hypotheses
  • Chapter 15: Statistical Evaluation of Data (pages 441-445)
  • Chapter 16: The Goal of a Research Report (16.1, pages 496-497)
  • Instructional Materials
Introduction Discussion
Introduce yourself in the "Introductions" topic of our class discussion area. Please give us more than your name. For example, include what part of the country (or world) you are from, your profession, hobbies, interest in psychology/ sociology, and any other information that can help us get to know you.  Original post due Wednesday; responses by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.
Discussion 1: Induction, Deduction, and the Scientific Method
Compare and contrast induction and deduction. Write a paragraph describing how you understand the contribution of each to the scientific method. Provide examples of each. Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your responses to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.
Discussion 2: Writer's Workshop - Hypotheses
Use this discussion to generate five research topics and hypotheses/ predictions. For example, if one topic of interest is the relationship between violent video games and aggression, you could hypothesize that children who play violent video games will have more incidences of violent behavior than children who do not play these games. The authors review different ways of getting research ideas /hypotheses. Where did you get your research ideas? Consider using the different ways suggested by the authors as using multiple methods will likely help you generate your hypotheses faster. Be sure to indicate which of these ways you used. Also be sure to cite your sources. Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your responses to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.
Week 2: Operational Definitions, Reliability, Validity, & Ethical Considerations in Research
Readings
  • Chapter 3: Defining and Measuring Variables
  • Chapter 4: Ethics in Research
  • Chapter 15: Statistical Evaluation of Data: Descriptive Statistics (pages 445-454)
  • Chapter 16: General APA Guidelines for Writing and Style Format (16.2, pages 497-502)
  • Video: Ethics in Psychological Research
  • Video: Key Issues in Psychological Research
  • Instructional Materials
Discussion 3: Operational Definitions

Go back to Discussion 2. Select a dependent variable from one of your proposed research topics that is a construct. Provide an operational definition of this construct. For example, I hypothesized in Discussion 2 that children who play violent video games will have more incidences of violent behavior than children who do not play these games. My dependent variable, aggression, is a construct and needs an operational definition. I could define aggression by the number of incidences of physically violent or threatening behavior. In this case, I would also need to define violent behavior. I could operationally define violent behavior as physical assault (pushing, slapping, hitting, punching, kicking, pinching pulling hair, hitting or stabbing with an object), threatening with a weapon (e.g., gun, knife, or any object that could be used to harm).

Once you have defined your construct, select one form of reliability and one form of validity, and provide an example of how problems with each can affect your measurement of this variable. Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your responses to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Discussion 4: Informed Consent

What is informed consent? Select at least one video from this week (Ethics in Psychological Research or Key Issues in Psychological Research) to view for this assignment. What are the key points about ethics in research highlighted in each of these films, particularly those regarding informed consent? How would you use these to inform how you would handle the following two situations:

  1. You have recruited a potential participant for a study that you are running of life events and depressive disorders. When the potential participant arrives, you discover that she has vision impairment. What are the ethical issues in this scenario, especially regarding informed consent? What do you do?
  2. A participant comes to the second phase of a study that you are running. He said that he is not sure that he wants to complete the psychiatric interview again. He noted that he had a hard time sleeping the week after he completed the first phase. What do you do?

Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your responses to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Research Proposal Part 1: Hypothesis and References

Begin thinking of your hypothesis early in the course. Brainstorm possible topics with your classmates in Writer’s Workshop during Week 1, then generate a hypothesis for your research proposal and include a reference page of seven possible sources (APA- or ASA-style citations) including experiments, case studies, or meta-analyses published in peer review journals. You may, of course, revise and refine the question as you continue your research and writing about the topic. Your research question or hypothesis is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Sampling Issues, Reliability & Validity
Readings
  • Chapter 5:  Selecting Research Participants
  • Chapter 6: Research Strategies and Validity
  • Chapter 15: Statistical Evaluation of Data: Descriptive Statistics (pages 445-454)
  • Chapter 16: The Elements of an APA-Style Research Report (pages 502-508)
  • Instructional Materials
Discussion 5: Sampling Issues

Select one of the studies for your final paper. Briefly describe the sampling method that the authors used. How did the authors select their sample for each of these studies? What are the pros and cons of using these methods? What are the ethical considerations? How did the authors' sample selection affect reliability and validity? Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your response to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Discussion 6: Reliability and Validity
Select another one of the sources collected for your research proposal. Identify potential threats to reliability and validity in this study and discuss how the authors addressed these either in their research design or in the conclusions that they drew about their findings. What recommendations do you have for improving the design? Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your responses to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.
Research Proposal Part 2: Conceptualization

For this paper, you will begin the process of writing your Research Proposal. This is not meant to be something you can just copy and paste into your Proposal; your Proposal will need more detail than you will have here and will be formatted differently.  However, you will certainly use this information when writing your final paper. The entire paper should be 2 to 3 pages containing 500 to 750 words explaining the following: 

    1. State your research question, and specify the independent and dependent variables (IV and DV).
    2. Describe the conceptualization of your IV and DV. It is possible that you will have more than one construct. In order to provide an adequate description of the conceptualization process you will need to consult at least TWO outside sources besides your textbooks.  Be sure you use APA format for your citations and references. 
    3. Provide an operational definition for your DV.  This will be similar to what you did in Week 2,  Discussion 3, but should be more polished; incorporating any feedback you received on that discussion.
    4. Describe specifically how you would measure your DV.  Briefly describe the type of research strategy you will use to test your hypothesis and how you will select your sample (approximately 1 paragraph).

Write from the third person point of view (i.e., no “I”s, “we”s or “you”s) and reference all sources using APA- or ASA-style citations. Unacceptable internet resources include: Wikipedia; WikiInfo; Anarchopedia; or any other Internet resource where authors and/or sources cannot be identified and properly cited using APA- or ASA-style standards. Submit your paper by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday. ​

Week 4: The Experimental Research Strategy & Between Subjects Design
Readings
  • Chapter 7: The Experimental Research Strategy
  • Chapter 8: Experimental Designs: Between Subjects Designs
  • Chapter 16: Method (pages 509-511)
  • Instructional Materials

Discussion 7: Between Subjects Deisgn

Use the following information to construct a research method with between subjects design.

You are a research psychologist and want to know how to best help students prepare for a midterm exam. You decide to test three different methods of exam preparation: flashcards, study groups, and a study guide that focuses on a deeper level of processing. Consider sample recruitment, the number of groups that you will have, and how you will assign participants to groups. What are the potential threats to internal validity and how did you address these?  

Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your response to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Discussion 8: Writer's Workshop - References

Submit a draft of your reference page including 7 sources with APA or ASA style formatting. Select two other student’s post and correct their formatting or note that you did not find any errors. Explain why you believe that the formatting is correct or needs modification. Please note that if you find additional sources that you would like to add to your paper later in the course, just add these to your final reference list. Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your responses to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Midterm Exam (Proctored)

This proctored, closed-book Midterm Exam will cover chapters 1-8 and the assigned readings from chapters 15-16. There are four parts to the exam, including 14 multiple choice questions, 5 short answers, and 2 essays. Each part should take you no longer than 30 minutes to complete. You will have 2 hours and only one attempt to complete the exam so please study in advance. Submit your Midterm by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sunday. ​

Week 5: Within Subjects Design / Non-experimental and Quasi-experimental Design
Readings
  • Chapter 9: Experimental Design, Within Subjects Design
  • Chapter 10: The Non-Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Strategies
  • Chapter 15: Statistical Evaluation of Data: Inferential statistics (pages 460-476)
  • Chapter 16: Results, Discussion, References (pages 511-517)
  • Instructional Materials
Discussion 9: Research Design

Select one of the studies for your paper. Carefully summarize the research design that the authors selected for this study. Do they use within-subjects or between-subjects design? What were the potential threats to internal validity and how did the authors control for these? Which statistical analyses did the authors choose to test their hypotheses or research questions? Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your responses to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Discussion 10: Within-Subjects Design

Consider Discussion 7 when you examined different study strategies across groups. Select one of these methods. Describe a within-subjects experimental design that will test whether this strategy makes a difference. Consider threats to internal validity such as history, maturation, instrumentation, and statistical regression. Describe some strategies that you can use to minimize these threats. Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your responses to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Research Proposal Part 3: Introduction and Methodology

Build this paper from your Week 3 Conceptualization Paper by adding an introduction and proposed methodology, including description of the participants proposed for your study, ethical considerations, the measures that you would use, and your proposed procedure for data collection. 

The paper should be 5 to 7 pages, containing 1,250 to 1,750 words. The first 2-3 pages will contain your introduction. Your introduction will start with the general idea, include a comprehensive literature review and funnel down to your hypothesis. You will not have an introduction heading. Your introduction should answer these questions:  

  • What problem or topic are you proposing and  why you are proposing to study this topic? For example, if it is depression, this is a major public health problem with direct and indirect costs to society. State what some of these are and why it is important to have a better understanding of depression. (1 paragraph) 
  • What have other researchers found (literature review)? If your topic is depression - what are the prevalence and incidence rates? Are men or women more likely to be diagnosed? What are other findings specific to your question? (2-3 pages depending on your topic) 
  • What is your construct and how is it typically defined in other research papers? How are you defining your construct(s)? What are the dimensions and indicators of these dimensions? Your final operational definition? (1-3 paragraphs depending on the number of constructs).
  • A paragraph stating the purpose of your proposed study, your independent and dependent variables and research question/hypothesis. 

The remaining 3 to 5 pages will contain your methodology. Include the header and sub-headers below. 

Method

Research Design

Describes the proposed research design for the study (e.g., experimental – between, within or mixed design, non-experimental, correlational, factorial).

Participants 

Describe the participants you plan to recruit including the total number, inclusion and exclusion criteria, incentives (e.g., payment, course credit) and recruitment procedures (approximately 1 paragraph).

Ethical considerations 

Discuss the ethical considerations specific to your study, e.g., informed consent, etc. (approximately 1-2 paragraphs).

Measures and equipment

Discuss the instruments or tools that you will use to measure your independent and dependent variables (approximately 1 paragraph per measure).

Procedure for data collection 

What will participants do from the time that they enter your study? Describe how you will collect your data (approximately 2-3 paragraphs). 

Your paper is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday. 

Week 6: Factorial Design
Readings
  • Chapter 11: Factorial Designs
  • Chapter 12: The Correlational Research Strategy
  • Chapter 15: Statistical Evaluation of Data: Finding the right statistics for your data. (pages 454-459 and 477-492)
  • Chapter 16: Presentation and Publication (pages 517-525)
  • Instructional Materials
Discussion 11: Statistical Analysis

Describe the statistical analyses that you have chosen to test your predictions / research questions and why you chose this particular analysis. Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your response to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Discussion 12: Writer's Workshop - Research Proposal Peer Review
Post a complete draft of your research proposal for your classmates to review. You will likely want to post it as an attached file. In your cover note, provide specific questions about areas you would like feedback on. Then provide feedback on two of your classmates’ papers. Identify at least one strength of each of the papers you review and one area that could use some improvement.

Some things to look for during your peer review:

  1. Is the research question or hypothesis clearly stated?
  2. Does the author provide compelling and credible research in the introduction?
  3. Are proposed variables and constructs operationally defined?
  4. Is the method clearly described? Did the author select the correct statistical tests for analysis?
  5. Is the use of APA- or ASA-format correct?

Your draft is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your peer review of at least two other classmates’ drafts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Descriptive Research
Readings
  • Chapter 13: The Descriptive Research Strategy
  • Chapter 15: Statistical Evaluation of Data: Finding the right statistics for your data. (pages 477-492)
  • Instructional Materials
Discussion 13: Correlational and Descriptive Research

Select either a correlational research (described in Chapter 12) or a descriptive research approach (described in Chapter 13). Write an abstract or brief description of an original study that uses your selected research approach, including the research question or hypothesis, method, and statistics that you could use to analyze your findings. Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your responses to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Discussion 14: Descriptive or Simulation Research

Respond to one of the options below. 

Options:

  1. Find an example of a study that uses a descriptive research approach either through the Columbia College Online Library databases or via Google Scholar. Describe the authors’ questions, method and statistics that they used to test their question.
  2. During Week 4 you learned about simulation experiments. Review either the Stanford Prison Study or Bordens and Horowitz’s (1983) jury simulation study. What were the goals of the author(s) and their hypotheses? Why did they choose simulation studies as research design? What were there findings and the problems associated with the methods that they used?

Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your responses to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday.

Research Proposal Part 4: Final Draft

In Discussion 12 last week, you received feedback on the draft of your proposal from peer reviews. This week, you should be working on revisions. The final draft of your research proposal is worth 200 points. The entire proposal should be 8 to 12 pages long, containing 2000 to 3000 words. It should conform to APA- or ASA-style and contain the following:

  1. abstract 
  2. introduction (problem or objective, literature review, conceptualization, identification of variables, hypothesis)
  3. research design 
  4. participants 
  5. ethical considerations 
  6. measurement/equipment 
  7. data collection methods  
  8. data analysis and expected results  
  9. references (APA/ASA style)

A more detailed grading rubric is available in the Content area of the course. The final draft of your Research Proposal is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Sunday. 

Week 8: Single Subject Research Design
Readings
  • Chapter 14: Single Subject Research Designs
  • Review Chapters 9-16
  • Instructional Materials
Discussion 15: Self-Reflection

As we come to the end of the course, tell your classmates what has been most valuable for you in this course. What do you see that is different in your writing process from the beginning of the class? What recommendations do you have for future students? Your original post is due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Wednesday; your response to at least two other classmates’ posts are due by 11:59 pm C.T. on Saturday, the last day of the course.

Final Exam

This Final Exam will cover chapters 9-16. There are four parts to the exam, including 14 multiple choice questions, five short answers, and two essays. Each part should take you no longer than 30 minutes to complete. You will have 2 hours and only one attempt to complete the exam so please study in advance. Submit your Final by 11:59 p.m. CT on Saturday, the last day of the course. ​



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted. Without prior approval, late assignments will only be accepted in the week following the due date. There will be a 10% deduction for late work. All late work for weeks 1 through 6 must be turned in by the end of week 7. No late work will be accepted after the close of class on Saturday of week 8. 

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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