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Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

HIST 372: American Indian History

Course Description

Analysis of American Indian history from prehistory to the present.  The course considers the integrity and viability of indigenous societies in North America, the dynamic process of cultural persistence and change, and the clash of cultures that began with European conquest.  In particular, it traces the formation and operation of U.S. government policy toward the “first peoples” over the course of several generations.  Particular attention is given to the pre-contact traditions, survival strategies, and tribal sovereignty exemplified by native communities in the U.S. Course meets Multicultural graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

Proctored Exams: Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • DuVal, Kathleen. (2007). The Native Ground: Indians and Colonists in the Heart of the Continent. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.
    • [ISBN-978-0-8122-1939-5]
  • Edmunds, R. David, et. al. (2006). The People: A History of Native America. Stamford, CT: Wadsworth/Cengage.
    • [ISBN-978-0-669-24495-3]
  • Lookingbill, Brad D. (2006). War Dance at Fort Marion: Plains Indian War Prisoners. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press.
    • [ISBN-978-0-8061-4467-2]
  • Rampolla, Mary Lynn. (2015). A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (8th ed.). Bedford/St. Martin’s.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4576-9088-4]
  • Townsend, Camilla, ed. (2009). American Indian History: A Documentary Reader. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4051-5908-1]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Welcome to the study of American Indian history. We will explore a comprehensive history of the original inhabitants of North America. For over two centuries, the U.S. government fashioned definitions of Indian people that contributed to their dispossession from ancestral homelands. Sometimes they were considered “foreign,” organized into tribes, led by chiefs, and resembling a nation. Sometimes they were considered “wards” of another regime. Sometimes they were not considered people at all. They were trapped by statelessness, which rendered them vulnerable to the powerful forces of nation-building in North America.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe the significant people, places, and events of American Indian history.
  2. Analyze the historical forces that shaped the pre-contact traditions of the indigenous societies in North America.
  3. Explain the strategies of resistance and accommodation employed by different Indian nations.
  4. Analyze the factors shaping federal Indian policy from removal to self-determination.
  5. Evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, and trends in the historiography of American Indians.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (16) 400 40%
Comparative Analysis 200 20%
Exams 400 40%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Win-gan-a-coa (Introductions) 0 Wednesday
Syllabus Quiz 0
Document Based Questions (DBQ): 25 Friday/Sunday
Term Identification (ID): 25
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Document Based Questions (DBQ): 25 Friday/Sunday
Term Identification (ID): 25
Proctor Information N/A Sunday
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Document Based Questions (DBQ): 25 Friday/Sunday
Term Identification (ID): 25
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Document Based Questions (DBQ): 25 Friday/Sunday
Term Identification (ID): 25
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Comparative Analysis: Draft 75 Monday
Document Based Questions (DBQ): 25 Friday/Sunday
Term Identification (ID): 25
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Comparative Analysis: Peer Critique 25 Monday
Document Based Questions (DBQ): 25 Friday/Sunday
Term Identification (ID): 25
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Document Based Questions (DBQ): 25 Friday/Sunday
Term Identification (ID): 25
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Comparative Analysis: Final 100 Monday
Document Based Questions (DBQ): 25 Thursday/Saturday
Term Identification (ID): 25
Final Exam 400 Saturday
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Syllabus Quiz

This simple quiz is designed to review the most pertinent information from the syllabus, the Read Me First page, and assignment instructions. You will need to have reviewed this information before taking the quiz. You may take this quiz as many times as you like. The Proctor Information folder in the Dropbox area will not open until you have scored a 100%.

Discussions

Discussions will consist of Document Based Questions (DBQ) and Term Identifications (ID). Active participation includes posting your initial post (or answer to the question/term listed), reading your classmates’ postings, and responding to your classmates. Your initial postings are expected to be original, well-written, substantial (250-300 words), and relevant to the question/term posted. For full participation credit, you must respond to at least two of your classmates in each discussion. Your responses may be less substantial than your initial post (100-150 words), but should be just as informative and thought-provoking. Detailed information for completing discussions, including tips for success, are included in the Content area of the course.

Discussion Logistics: All discussions must take place in the Discussions area. Postings submitted as attachments will receive zero credit. Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm Friday and response posts are due by 11:59 pm Sunday. (Please note the earlier due date for Week 8.) Each week the discussions will take place from Monday through Sunday. Initial posts are due Friday and responses will be due Sunday. The discussion topics will close at midnight Sunday, and you will not be able to make further postings even if you started the posting prior to midnight. Please plan accordingly.

Comparative Analysis

A comparative analysis is the process of examining a topic based on the similarities and differences of this topic presented in two different sources. For this assignment, you will select a topic significant in American Indian history (i.e. European colonization, adoption of permanent settlements, the effect of trade on the Abenaki tribe, etc.) and critically examine it (i.e., identify causes, key factors, and possible repercussions) by comparing and contrasting two primary sources. You will then support your analysis using information found in at least 5 secondary sources (in addition to the Edmunds text). Your final comparative analysis must be 10-12 pages (approximately 2,500 words), not including the bibliography page.

To aid you in the writing process, this assignment is broken into three parts: 1) a draft submission of your comparative analysis, 2) your critique of a classmate’s draft comparative analysis, and 3) the revised, final submission of your comparative analysis. Detailed instructions for completing each part of this assignment, including grading criteria and formatting guidelines, are available in the Content area of the course. You will not be able to successfully complete this assignment without carefully reviewing these instructions.

Comparative Analysis Logistics: The draft and final paper should be submitted to the corresponding folder in the Dropbox area. The critique exercise will take place in the Discussions area (in a private discussion topic for you and your group members). The Plagiarism Tutorial and Quiz is available to you through the Content area. You are not required to complete this tutorial and quiz. However, at this level in your academic career, I will expect that you understand what plagiarism is and how to avoid it. If you have any questions about plagiarism, I strongly encourage you to review this resource.

Please post any questions about any part of this assignment to the Open Topic in the Discussions area.

Final Exam

The final exam is comprehensive and proctored. It will require you to memorize, to reason, and to write. The exam consists of 50 multiple-choice and three essay questions. The exam is available from 8:00 a.m. Monday until 11:59 p.m. Saturday of Week 8. You will have two hours to take the exam. You are not allowed to reference books, notes, or any outside websites while taking the exam.


Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: The Native Universe
Getting Started
Before you do anything else, be sure to complete the following steps designed to help you get acclimated to the course.

1. Read the “Read Me First” page found in the Content area.
It may seem standardized because it must include specific information, but this page will also tell you a little more about me and will highlight ways to succeed in this course. It also includes an introductory video that explains how we will use each area of the course.
2. Read the syllabus. Even though we work through this material week by week, knowing the overall structure of the course, specific policy information, assignment overviews, and deadlines ahead of time can help you succeed. Please read the syllabus carefully and note important deadlines on your personal calendar or use the Checklist feature in the course.
3. Submit your Proctor Information. Please read the Proctor Policy for instructions on submitting your proctor’s information. You must submit this information via the course Dropbox by Sunday of Week 2. Not submitting your proctor information by the due date may result in you not being able to take the exam. It is also a good idea to schedule a testing time with your proctor before submitting their information.
Readings
• Read through Rampolla’s text and become familiar with the methods used to write history.
• Townsend, pp. 9-26
• Edmunds, pp. 1-26
Win-gan-a-coa (Introductions)
Win-gan-a-coa is a Croatoan word that means “Welcome, friend.” Let’s take time this week to get to know one another by posting introductions in the Discussions area. You could tell us about your family and friends, your school/work goals, and what you like to do for fun. You could also share why you decided to take this class. Feel free to post pictures, links to personal websites, or anything else that you are comfortable sharing.
Syllabus Quiz
Complete the Syllabus Quiz. This quiz highlights pertinent information to help you navigate the course environment and recall important assignment instructions and deadlines. It can be found in the Quizzes area of the course. It is strongly suggested that you complete this quiz by Wednesday of this week. However, you must complete this quiz with a 100% before your proctor’s information will be accepted.
Document Based Questions (DBQ):
Briefly summarize (1-2 sentences) the main themes in the document readings from Townsend. Then, answer the following: “What do these documents reveal about the types of changes that may begin to take place in people’s lives when they adopt agriculture and thus become sedentary?”
Term Identification (ID):
Select one term from the following list: potlatch, Chaco Canyon, kill sites, Iroquois Confederacy, Indian Knoll, band, petroglyphs, Mississippian societies, katsinas, Hohokam (lists for subsequent weeks will be in the Content area). Using the Edmunds reading, briefly define this term (1 paragraph). Then, using a peer-reviewed article you select, discuss the historical significance of this term within the context of American Indian history.
Week 2: Close Encounters
Readings
• Townsend, pp. 27-49
• Edmunds, pp. 27-134
• DuVal, pp. 1-127
Read Historiography2: Close Encounters, which may be found in the Content area of the course.
Document Based Questions (DBQ):
Briefly summarize (1-2 sentences) the main themes in the document readings from Townsend. Then, answer the following: “How did European attitudes toward American Indians change as they lived among them? After reading the documents from both chapters, do you conclude that American Indians were more violent than people elsewhere, less violent, or about as violent as most people? Why?” (Be sure to use evidence from the documents to support your answer.)
Term Identification (ID):
 Select one term from the list provided in the Content area for Week 2. Using the Edmunds reading, briefly define this term (1 paragraph). Then, using a peer-reviewed article you select, discuss the historical significance of this term within the context of American Indian history.
Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Spirited Resistance
Readings
• Townsend, pp. 50-88
• Edmunds, pp. 135-212
• DuVal, pp. 128-248
• Read Historiography3, which may be found in the Content area of the course.
Document Based Questions (DBQ):
Briefly summarize (1-2 sentences) the main themes in the document readings from Townsend. Then, answer the following: “At the end of the Revolutionary War, George Washington insisted on the importance of the Indians being allowed to keep some of their land. Why did he believe this was important? Did he believe their stay on the land would be permanent?”
Term Identification (ID):
Select one term from the list provided in the Content area for Week 3. Using the Edmunds reading, briefly define this term (1 paragraph). Then, using a peer-reviewed article you select, discuss the historical significance of this term within the context of American Indian history.
Week 4: Removal and Diaspora
Readings
• Townsend, pp. 89-121
• Edmunds, pp. 213-267
• Read Historiography4: Removal and Diaspora, which may be found in the Content area of the course.
Document Based Questions (DBQ):
Briefly summarize (1-2 sentences) the main themes in the document readings from Townsend. Then, answer the following: “What arguments were advanced in the 1820s to justify Indians being forced to leave their ancestral lands? What responses were offered by (a) Indians; (b) other whites?”
Term Identification (ID):
Select one term from the list provided in the Content area for Week 4. Using the Edmunds reading, briefly define this term (1 paragraph). Then, using a peer-reviewed article you select, discuss the historical significance of this term within the context of American Indian history.
Week 5: Wars in the West
Readings
• Townsend, pp. 122-153
• Edmunds, pp. 268-346
• Read Historiography5, which may be found in the Content area of the course.
Comparative Analysis: Draft
Please submit your draft of the Comparative Analysis to the correct folder in the Dropbox area.
Document Based Questions (DBQ):
Briefly summarize (1-2 sentences) the main themes in the document readings from Townsend. Then, answer the following: “Confronted with the US Cavalry, the Indians of the West made different choices. Do the narratives of Sarah Winnemucca and Black Elk make you think that people often felt torn or that different types of people simply had dramatically different reactions to the situation?”
Term Identification (ID):
Select one term from the list provided in the Content area for Week 5. Using the Edmunds reading, briefly define this term (1 paragraph). Then, using a peer-reviewed article you select, discuss the historical significance of this term within the context of American Indian history.
Week 6: The Growth of the BIA
Readings
• Townsend, pp. 154-170
• Edmunds, pp. 347-396
• Lookingbill, pp. 1-148
• Read Historiography6, which may be found in the Content area of the course.
Comparative Analysis: Peer Critique
You will receive your peer critique assignments on Wednesday of Week 5. Please post your peer critique feedback for a classmate to the correct forum in the Discussions area. Note: Use must use the guidelines provided in the Content area to construct your peer critique feedback.
Document Based Questions (DBQ):
Briefly summarize (1-2 sentences) the main themes in the document readings from Townsend. Then, answer the following: “Why do you think Carlos Montezuma and Chauncey Yellow Robe, who were themselves well educated and financially successful, evinced such anger and frustration?”
Term Identification (ID):
Select one term from the list provided in the Content area for Week 6. Using the Edmunds reading, briefly define this term (1 paragraph). Then, using a peer-reviewed article you select, discuss the historical significance of this term within the context of American Indian history.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: The Rise of Red Power
Readings
• Townsend, pp. 171-197
• Edmunds, pp. 397-453
• Lookingbill, pp. 149-203
• Read Historiography7, which may be found in the Content area of the course.
Document Based Questions (DBQ):
Briefly summarize (1-2 sentences) the main themes in the document readings from Townsend. Then, answer the following: “Where did the depth of feeling that is obviously present on the Lakota Sioux reservations in the 1970s come from?”
Term Identification (ID):
Select one term from the list provided in the Content area for Week 7. Using the Edmunds reading, briefly define this term (1 paragraph). Then, using a peer-reviewed article you select, discuss the historical significance of this term within the context of American Indian history.
Week 8: Indian Country in a New Millennium
Readings
• Townsend, pp. 198-232
• Edmunds, pp. 454-473
• Read Historiography8, which may be found in the Content area of the course.
Comparative Analysis: Final
Please submit the final version of your Comparative Analysis to the correct Dropbox folder.
Document Based Questions (DBQ):
Briefly summarize (1-2 sentences) the main themes in the document readings from Townsend. Then, answer the following: “When did the land your house occupies pass out of native hands?”
Term Identification (ID):
Select one term from the list provided in the Content area for Week 8. Using the Edmunds reading, briefly define this term (1 paragraph). Then, using a peer-reviewed article you select, discuss the historical significance of this term within the context of American Indian history.
Final Exam
The exam is available from 8:00 a.m. Monday until 11:59 p.m. Saturday. It must be taken under the supervision of your approved proctor.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Late Comparative Analysis papers (including drafts and peer critiques) and Final Exams will not be accepted unless circumstances beyond your control exist and you have communicated your situation to me within a reasonable time frame (if possible, before the original deadline). I reserve the right to refuse to accept your late work, but I will work with those who act honestly and responsibly.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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