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Online classes

Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

CJAD 328: Shooting Incidents

Course Description

Exploration and practical analysis of forensic evidence resulting from shooting incidents, including consideration of ballistics, ammunition, weapons/hardware, injury patterns in association with entry and exit wounds, and injury documentation and reconstruction techniques.

Prerequisite: CJAD 201; CJAD 203; junior standing and a declared Criminal Justice or Forensic Science major.

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Hueske, E. (2015). Practical Analysis and Reconstruction of Shooting Incidents (2nd ed.). Boca Raton, FL: Taylor & Francis Group.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4987-0766-4]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Shooting incident reconstruction looks at how this specialization differs from standard crime scene investigation. The shooting incident reconstructionist has to have expert knowledge in order to match a specific bullet to its firearm, accurately calculate the trajectory of a bullet, determine distance between shooter and victim, and to eventually testify as an expert witness. This course will provide you the opportunity to apply this knowledge in weekly exercises as well as work to reconstruct an interactive case study.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • A camera for recording video (including phone or webcam)
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To provide students with exposure to a special topic area in Criminal Justice and Forensic Science.
  • To provide students with an opportunity to apply theoretical learning to practical problems.
  • To encourage the students' development of analytical skills.
  • To assist students in applying relevant scientific and investigative principles to real and hypothetical problems in the Justice System.
  • To enhance critical thinking and practical skills on relevant issues.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the basic fundamental approaches to shooting incident analysis using scientific methods to recognize, evaluate and reconstruct a shooting incident.
  • Identify and describe the categories of firearms and ammunition.
  • Identify and explain shooting reconstruction equipment and use.
  • Describe how shell casings and projectiles are identified to specific weapons of origin.
  • Analyze and interpret shot patterns.
  • Describe and differentiate between internal, external and terminal ballistics.
  • Describe and distinguish between bullet hole and wound characteristics.
  • Demonstrate proper procedures and techniques in using gunshot residue field kits, blood field test kits and trace metal detection kits.
  • Analyze actual case studies and crime scene reports documenting shooting incidents.
  • Describe and apply relevant principles concerning shooting incident terminology, report writing and courtroom testimony.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions 240 24%
Dropbox 250 25%
Exercises 140 14%
Quizzes and Exams 370 37%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion (not graded) -- Wednesday
Plagiarism Tutorial and Quiz --
Discussion 1 – Shooting Scene Procedures 15 Sunday
Discussion 2 – Case Study Part 1 15
Dropbox 1 – The Scientific Method 50
Quiz 1 20
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 – Pros and Cons of the Latest Technology 15 Sunday
Discussion 4 – Case Study Part 2 15
Exercise 1 – Impact Angle Calculations 50
Quiz 2 20
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 – Physical vs. Testimonial Evidence 15 Sunday
Discussion 6 – Case Study Part 3 15
Exercise 2 – Firearms and Ammunition Classification 30
Quiz 3 20
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 – Reliability of Distance Determination of Shotgun Shells 15 Sunday
Discussion 8 – Case Study Part 4 15
Exercise 3 – Distance Determination Through Shot Patterns 30
Midterm Exam 100
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 10 – Case Study Part 5 15 Sunday
Discussion 9 – Reliability of Gunshot Residue Testing 15
Exercise 4 – Which Evidence Matters? 30
Quiz 4 20
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 – Cold Case: JFK Assassination 15 Sunday
Discussion 12 – Case Study Part 6 15
Dropbox 2 – JFK Case Analysis 50
Quiz 5 20
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13 – Distance Determination Using Back Spatter 15 Sunday
Discussion 14 – Case Study Part 7 15
Dropbox 3 – Case Study Analysis 50
Quiz 6 20
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15 – What Makes Good Expert Testimony? 15 Saturday
Discussion 16 – Case Study 15
Dropbox 4 – Expert Testimony 100
Final Exam 150
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Each week, you will participate in two different discussions worth 15 points each. The first discussion will be based on the week’s readings and the second will be based on a case study you will follow throughout the course. Your initial post is worth 10 points and should be at least 300 words in length, providing details and examples to back up your answers. You are also expected to respond to at least two classmates’ posts. Your responses are worth 5 points, should be at least 150 words and go beyond saying “I agree” or “good job,” adding to the discussion in a substantial way.


Exercises

In the Quizzes area of the course, there will be four different exercises. These exercises allow you to not only apply knowledge from the week’s readings but to learn from your mistakes. For each exercise, you will be allowed three attempts with your highest attempt being recorded in the grade book.


Dropbox

There will be four different dropbox assignments throughout the course. For each dropbox assignment, you should save your file in .doc, .docx, or .pdf format and upload it to the appropriate dropbox. Papers should be double-spaced, use size 12 font, and use 1-inch margins. You are expected to write with proper spelling, punctuation, and grammar, citing any resources you might use in proper APA format. More specific information on each assignment can be found in the course schedule and Content area in D2L.

Note: You must complete the Plagiarism Tutorial and pass the Plagiarism Quiz with an 80% or higher before any dropbox will become available to you.


Quizzes and Exams

Quizzes - During weeks 1-3 and 5-7, you will have a short, 20-point quiz based on the readings for the week.  Questions will vary in type from matching to multiple choice and true/false. You will have 30 minutes to complete each quiz and you will only be given one attempt. 

Midterm Exam - During Week 4, there will be a comprehensive midterm exam consisting of questions from Weeks 1-3 as well as new questions from Week 4. The Midterm will be worth 100 points and will consist of a mixture of matching, multiple choice, and true/false questions. You will have 90 minutes to complete the exam.

Final Exam - During Week 8, you will have a comprehensive final exam consisting of questions from weeks 1-7 as well as new questions from Week 8. The Final Exam will be worth 150 points and will be a mixture of matching, multiple choice, and true/false questions. You will have 120 minutes to complete the exam.


Case Study

Throughout the course, there will be an interactive module walking you through a specific case. You will play the role of an investigator in training and the module will give you new evidence each week to analyze as part of the larger case.

There will be a discussion each week where you will be able to discuss the case and draw conclusions. In Week 7, you will write an analysis based on this case and in Week 8, you will give expert testimony on video. The interactive modules themselves are not graded but they will be the basis for several assignments so they are of high importance.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Introduction to Shooting Scene Reconstruction
Readings

Chapter 3

Introduction Discussion (not graded)

For this discussion, introduce yourself to the rest of the class. However, rather than typing up a short bio, you need to turn in a 1-2 minute video introducing yourself to the class. Use any type of camera you like (even phone or tablet), just make sure that we can see and hear you well. Upload the video to your YouTube account (included with your CougarMail account) and post the link to the discussion by 11:59 PM Central Time on Wednesday. (See the Content area for easy tips on making quality videos as well as uploading tips and instructions.)

Plagiarism Tutorial and Quiz

View the Plagiarism Tutorial in the Content area of the course; then take the Plagiarism Quiz by 11:59 PM CT on Wednesday. You must pass the quiz with an 80% or higher before dropboxes in the course will become available to you.

Discussion 1 – Shooting Scene Procedures

What is the difference between basic crime scene investigation and shooting incident reconstruction?  Start by reading the article provided in the Content area from Evidence Magazine, then post your opinion on the major differences. Think about how the scientific method is applied, whether you are using inductive or deductive reasoning, and what questions you would ask. Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out any major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Discussion 2 – Case Study Part 1

After going through part 1 of the case study, you should now be familiar with the basics of the case and the major evidence involved. For this first discussion post, point out what you believe to be the most important evidence, any major conclusions you can draw at this point, and a few major questions that you feel need to be answered.  Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Dropbox 1 – The Scientific Method

The scientific method takes a very systematic approach toward solving any problem. In order to help you understand this process, you will need to write out a step-by-step approach for solving two problems with the scientific method.

Problem 1 – From the list provided in the Content area, choose one problem. Apply the scientific method to identify the problem, make a hypothesis, carry out tests, refine your hypothesis, then develop a theory. Your explanation of each step can be brief but must be detailed and specific.

Problem 2 – This time, you will need to choose a problem that you have encountered recently in your own life. Apply the scientific method to identify the problem, make a hypothesis, carry out tests, refine your hypothesis, then develop a theory. Your explanation of each step can be brief but must be detailed and specific.

Your final paper should use size 12 font, have 1-inch margins, and if you performed any research include citations in APA format. Save your final draft in .doc, .docx, or .pdf format and upload it to the appropriate dropbox by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Quiz 1

Take the 20-point quiz over Chapter 3 of your textbook. Due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Week 2: Reconstruction Equipment and Mathematics
Readings

Chapters 4 and 6

Discussion 3 – Pros and Cons of the Latest Technology

First, read the article and watch the video from Leica Geosystems (in the Content area) about some of the latest 3d laser scanning technology is used in shooting incident reconstructions. Post to the discussion what you think the most important pros and cons are of using this technology, using details from the article (and possibly your own research) to support your opinion. Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out any major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Discussion 4 – Case Study Part 2

During part 2 of the case study, you were introduced to new evidence and collection techniques. How has this evidence changed your earlier conclusions and what information do you still believe you need to know? Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Exercise 1 – Impact Angle Calculations

Exercise 1 is located in the Quizzes area of the course and will take you through five different impact angle calculations. You will be given images of bullet holes with scale and be asked to determine the length, the width, and then calculate the impact angle. When you are finished, you will receive immediate feedback on how you performed, then be allowed to try again. You will be given three attempts with the grade from your highest attempt being recorded in the gradebook. This exercise must be complete by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Quiz 2

Take the 20-point quiz over Chapters 4 and 6 of your textbook. Due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Week 3: Firearms and Ammunition
Readings

Chapter 5

Discussion 5 – Physical vs. Testimonial Evidence

In every case, there is a combination of physical and testimonial evidence that leads to an ultimate conclusion. The textbook and work for this course both focus on the physical evidence of firearms, ammunition, and ballistics. View the TED-Ed video on “The Problem with Eyewitness Testimony” (available in the Content area), then write your initial discussion post on whether eyewitness testimony should even be considered in shooting incident reconstruction. Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out any major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Discussion 6 – Case Study Part 3

During part 3 of the case study, you were introduced to new evidence and collection techniques. How has this evidence changed your earlier conclusions and what information do you still believe you need to know? Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Exercise 2 – Firearms and Ammunition Classification

Exercise 2 is located in the Quizzes area of the course and will take you through 15 different firearms or ammunition types for you to classify/identify. You will be allowed 3 attempts on this exercise but be aware that the questions are pulled randomly from a question bank so it’s possible that won’t see the same question twice! This exercise must be complete by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Quiz 3

Take the 20-point quiz over Chapter 5 of your textbook. Due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Week 4: Shot Patterns, Bullet Holes, and Wounds
Readings

Chapters 9 and 12

Discussion 7 – Reliability of Distance Determination of Shotgun Shells

Your textbook gives you a very standard calculation for determining shooting distance by the size of a shotgun pattern. However, manufacturers have made many improvements over the years in order to tighten shotgun shell patterns and improve accuracy. Imagine that you are already working in the field and need to devise a way to keep up with current ammunition for accurate weapon identification and distance determination. Based on your readings and your own internet research, propose one or two possible solutions for this problem. Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out any major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Discussion 8 – Case Study Part 4

During part 4 of the case study, you were introduced to new evidence and collection techniques. How has this evidence changed your earlier conclusions and what information do you still believe you need to know? Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Exercise 3 – Distance Determination Through Shot Patterns

Exercise 3 is located in the Quizzes area of the course and will take you through six different distance determination calculations. You will be given images of shot patterns with scale and be asked to determine the length, the width, and then calculate the distance to the shooter. When you are finished, you will receive immediate feedback on how you performed, then be allowed to try again.  You will be given three attempts with the grade from your highest attempt being recorded in the gradebook. This exercise must be complete by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Midterm Exam

Take the 100-point exam over Chapters 3-6, 9, and 12 of your textbook. Due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Week 5: Testing of Components and GSR
Readings

Chapters 10 and 11

Discussion 10 – Case Study Part 5

During part 5 of the case study, you were introduced to new evidence and collection techniques. How has this evidence changed your earlier conclusions and what information do you still believe you need to know? Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Discussion 9 – Reliability of Gunshot Residue Testing

First, view the resources available in the Content area regarding the validity of gunshot residue testing. In your initial post, give your opinion on whether GSR tests should still be a regular part of a shooting investigation and what impact those results will (or won’t) have. Be sure to back up your opinion with details and examples from your resources. Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out any major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Exercise 4 – Which Evidence Matters?

Exercise 4 is located in the Quizzes area of the course and will take you through 15 different pieces of evidence from a single crime scene. You will be given images and/or descriptions of the evidence and be asked to simply determine whether the evidence is of value to the investigation or not. When you are finished, you will receive immediate feedback on how you performed, then be allowed to try again. You will be given three attempts with the grade from your highest attempt being recorded in the gradebook. This exercise must be complete by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Quiz 4

Take the 20-point quiz over Chapters 10 and 11 of your textbook. Due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Week 6: Ballistics
Readings

Chapter 17

Discussion 11 – Cold Case: JFK Assassination

The JFK Assassination was a tragic historical event, but it also provides a great opportunity for teaching and investigation. Start by looking through the video and internet resources in the Content area. As you go through these resources, try to pinpoint which side of the case you fall on: was Lee Harvey Oswald the single shooter or does the physical evidence support a multiple shooter theory?  When giving your opinion, give at least two major pieces of evidence for support. Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Discussion 12 – Case Study Part 6

During part 6 of the case study, you were introduced to new evidence and collection techniques. How has this evidence changed your earlier conclusions and what information do you still believe you need to know? Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out any major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Dropbox 2 – JFK Case Analysis

For this dropbox assignment, you will need to first look through the links and material provided on the JFK assassination. After combing through the evidence, write a 2-3 page analysis of the evidence and your ultimate conclusion of what happened. Include your name, the course name, and the title of the case you are analyzing. Also make sure that you back up your opinions with evidence provided by those resources.

Your final paper should use size 12 font, have 1-inch margins, and your sources should be referenced in APA format. Save your final draft in .doc, .docx, or .pdf format and upload it to the appropriate dropbox by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Quiz 5

Take the 20-point quiz over Chapter 17 of your textbook. Due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Ricochets, Bloodstains, and Case Analysis
Readings

Chapters 13, 14, and 16

Discussion 13 – Distance Determination Using Back Spatter

It stands to reason that if a shooter is relatively close to a victim that the victim’s blood may spatter back onto the shooter or the firearm. However, there are a lot of different variables to consider. Take a look at the articles provided in the Content area, then write your discussion post stating your opinion whether distance determination using back spatter can be used as conclusive evidence in a case. Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Discussion 14 – Case Study Part 7

During part 7 of the case study, you were introduced to new evidence and collection techniques. How has this evidence changed your earlier conclusions and what information do you still believe you need to know? Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out any major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Dropbox 3 – Case Study Analysis

Case analysis is the end result of all the investigative work you've done. Throughout the analysis, you build a case by presenting pieces of evidence, concluding with your theory of the crime. Refer back to all 7 parts of the case study thus far, the textbook, and any notes you have taken along the way. When finished reading your analysis, someone who has never been exposed to this case should be able to fully understand what took place and see clearly how you came to your conclusions. Your paper should be structured using the framework outlined in the Content area, where you are also provided with additional directions and tips on writing this summary report.

Your paper should be 3-5 pages in length, size 12 font, have 1 inch margins, and your sources should be referenced in APA format. Save your final draft in .doc, .docx, or .pdf format and upload it to the appropriate dropbox by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Quiz 6

Take the 20-point quiz over Chapters 13, 14, and 16 of your textbook. Due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday.

Week 8: Expert Testimony
Readings

Chapter 19

Discussion 15 – What Makes Good Expert Testimony?

First, read the article provided for you in the Content area of the course, then watch the video located in the same place. The video is from a civil liability trial, but the reliability of the expert witness works just the same. While watching the video, look back at the list of tips for expert witnesses to see which ones he missed. In the discussion, post your ideas about what you would need to do in order to make sure that you are prepared to be an expert witness, focusing both on your expert knowledge and the way that you present yourself to the jury. Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Saturday.

Discussion 16 – Case Study

Part 8 of the case study reveals the complete results of the case.  In your discussion post, point out one area of the case where your conclusions were correct, one area where your conclusions were incorrect, and one major thing you have learned from this case study. Respond to at least two classmates’ posts, pointing out any major similarities or differences between your posts. All posts are due by 11:59 PM CT on Saturday.

Dropbox 4 – Expert Testimony

One of the main duties of the shooting incident reconstructionist is to provide expert testimony in court. Testifying isn’t just about knowing the information and being able to explain how you arrived at it, but also about how you appear, how well you speak, and how you present yourself. At midnight on Monday, a document will be unlocked containing five questions from a prosecuting attorney that you will need to answer on video. You should only shoot the video one time and without making any edits. When shooting the video, make sure that you are dressed properly for court, you are sitting as you would in court, and that you can be seen and heard clearly on the video. (More instructions, tips, and examples are available in the Content area of the course.) When you are finished, upload your video to YouTube. Because the dropbox will only accept a document, please upload a document that contains a link to your YouTube video. You will be graded mostly on the content of your answers, but how you present yourself will be a portion of the grade! Due by 11:59 PM CT on Saturday.

Final Exam

Take the 150-point exam over all chapters of the textbook covered in this course (Chapters 3-14, and 16-19). Due by 11:59 PM CT on Saturday.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

You will not be allowed to complete dropbox assignments, video exercises, or exams beyond the posted due dates. Quizzes may be taken up to 3 days late with a 10% penalty if you contact your instructor at least 24 hours prior to the due date for approval.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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