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Online classes

Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

CISS 370: Operating Systems

Course Description

The hardware, firmware and software organization of computer systems, basic operating systems concepts, concurrent processes, CPU and disk scheduling, memory management, deadlocks, systems evaluation and simulation, and performance measurement.

Prerequisite: CISS 350 or 358

Proctored Exams: Midterm and Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Stallings, William. Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles. 8th. Prentice Hall, 2015.
    • ISBN-978-0-13-380591-8
      • Note: This text comes with an access code to supplementary resources. These resources are optional, and are not required for course completion.

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Our primary objective for CISS 370 is to provide students with a basic understanding of operating systems, their structures and some of the issues that must be addressed in designing an operating system.  We will touch upon operating systems for a variety of systems such as standalone, multiuser and real-time embedded.

First, we will make our initial introductions and become acquainted with the expectations of the class. After becoming acquainted we will cover some computer system basics and operating systems. Once we are comfortable with the basics we will move our discussions to processes and threads.  Then it will be time to understand how operating systems manage them via concurrency and its major design focus areas of mutual exclusion, synchronization, deadlock and starvation. Memory management is an area where operating systems have made computing more powerful for the user.  We will cover a number of algorithms used to manage memory as well as key concepts such as physical versus logical addressing as well as pages and frames.  At the halfway point, we will take a look at scheduling which can be argued is one of the operating systems primary duties.  We will look at some of the issues that must be addressed in scheduling on multiprocessor systems. The next discussions turn to I/O and the importance of buffering, file allocation and blocking.   This would appear on the surface to be the easy part of designing an operating system but we will learn that it can be very tricky and has its own set of issues that must be considered during design. Next, we will look at security issues, which impact everything we do with computers and the operating system is no exception. We will cover means to authenticate users and the ever-present dangers of viruses. We will wrap up our course with a few key concepts that we see with operating systems today.  Distributed processing is an approach to reduce burdens on clients but introduces issues on availability and latencies.  Our discussions will cover the pros and cons of fat and thin clients.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To examine the issues involved in operating system design and operation.
  • To understand concurrency control issues.
  • To examine file and memory management techniques.
  • To understand scheduling issues and approaches including processor scheduling and disk scheduling.
  • To understand embedded operating systems and their uses.
  • To investigate virtual environments and distributed processing.
  • To investigate operating system security issues.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Explain the major functions of an operating system.
  • Explain threads.
  • Explain concurrency control including deadlock and starvation and techniques for managing concurrency.
  • Evaluate memory management issues including virtual memory, paging, and segmentation techniques.
  • Contrast the most common processor scheduling techniques including the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  • Explain disk scheduling issues and techniques.
  • Evaluate file management systems.
  • Evaluate distributed processing including client/server models and cluster models.
  • Examine operating system security issues.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions 240 24%
Info Post Discussions 60 6%
Chapter Questions 180 18%
Papers 120 12%
Quizzes 100 10%
Exams 300 30%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introductions - Wednesday
Discussion Topic 1 15 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion Topic 2 15 Friday/Sunday
Info Post Discussion 1 10 Sunday
Chapter Question 1 30
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion Topic 3 15 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion Topic 4 15 Friday/Sunday
Quiz 1 50 Saturday
Info Post Discussion 2 10 Sunday
Chapter Question 2 30
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion Topic 5 15 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion Topic 6 15 Friday/Sunday
Info Post Discussion 3 10 Sunday
Chapter Question 3 30
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion Topic 7 15 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion Topic 8 15 Friday/Sunday
Paper 1 60 Sunday
Midterm Exam (Chapters 1-8) 150
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion Topic 9 15 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion Topic 10 15 Friday/Sunday
Info Post Discussion 4 10 Sunday
Chapter Question 4 30
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion Topic 11 15 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion Topic 12 15 Friday/Sunday
Quiz 2 50 Saturday
Info Post Discussion 5 10 Sunday
Chapter Question 5 30
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion Topic 13 15 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion Topic 14 15 Friday/Sunday
Info Post Discussion 6 10 Sunday
Chapter Question 6 30
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion Topic 15 15 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion Topic 16 15 Friday/Saturday
Paper 2 60 Friday
Final Exam (Chapters 9-16) 150 Saturday
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Readings and Activities

We will cover 16 chapters in the required text for this course for an average of 2 chapters per week.  During our discussions the instructor may recommend online articles of interest that will not be mandatory but will help deepen your understanding of the topics we are discussing.  Should you come across an article in your research that you find informative, please share a link to it in a post along with a short summary of the article.   


Discussion

Each week, the instructor will post 2 discussion topics. Responses should reflect college level efforts.  This means each response should be informative and well written and not a quick one or two sentence response that shares minimal information.  Direct responses to the discussion questions need to be at least 250 words to demonstrate your detailed understanding of the topics.  In some cases this may require additional reading or enhancing the response through sharing experiences that you may have as it relates to the subject matter.    

In addition to the direct responses to the two questions each week, you should provide 2 posts in each topic against your classmates’ (or the instructor's) responses.  These responses should advance the discussions and provide more than a “Good post, I agree with you.”  The instructor will be looking for added information or experiences or opinions to advance our discussions.  A minimum of 100 words is required for these posts to ensure that you have shared enough information to make our discussions interesting.  These participation posts should be posted in a timely manner to provide relevant input to the discussions.  Your two posts for the first weekly topic must be shared by Friday and your posts for the second weekly topic must be shared by Sunday.  Posting earlier is a good thing.  Posting after these dates results in no points for the participation portion of the discussions.

Points for Discussions are awarded on the following basis (explained in Grading Criteria found in the course content):

  • 7 Points for the Direct Response to the Question.
  • 8 Points for postings in response to other students’ or the instructor posts (4 points each for 2 posts).

(Note the posts to other students or my posts must be within the same week of the Questions as no points will be awarded for posts that are posted after midnight Sunday of the current week)


Info Post Discussion

Each week (EXCLUDING Weeks 4 and 8), the instructor will share a number of Info Posts. You may select any post and create a reply.  College level effort is expected in your response, which should be a minimum of 150 words for the Info Post Discussion.

The Info Post discussion in Weeks 4 and 8 are not graded and the extra posts are not required but they certainly are encouraged.  If you would like to enhance our discussions feel free to share as many posts as you are able.  


Chapter Questions

There will be six Chapter Question assignments that will be based on the chapters in the textbook.  They should be submitted to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox area of the course by the assigned due date.  These responses must be complete but you do not have to submit them in a formal format.  However, they should be written clearly and be understandable so please use proper English and avoid acronyms unless you also spell them out the first time they are used.  Never use abbreviations.  As with the topic responses, college level effort is expected so the same rules apply.  There is no fixed length for these responses but would expect that they are more detailed than the Weekly topic responses. Set a goal of a minimum of 350+ words and you should be able to adequately cover the material.


Papers

Each student will be required to write two papers covering operating system topics.  The first is assigned during Week 1 and will be due at the end of Week 4.  The second is assigned at the beginning of the Week 5 and is due on Friday of Week 8.  Papers should be submitted to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox area of the course. Please see the Grading Criteria section below. Each paper must address the indicated topics and follow these requirements:

(1)  2-3 Pages (a double spaced page is typically 320-340 words)
(2)  12 Point (Arial or Times New Roman) Font
(3)  Double Spaced
(4)  1” margins
(5)  You must use a minimum of 2 references


Quizzes

There will be two quizzes, one in Week 2 and one in Week, 6, that will cover various chapters of the textbook.  Each quiz will contain 10 multiple choice questions.  They can be accessed through the Quizzes area of the course and must be completed by Saturday, 5:00 PM Central Time on the week they are given.

Exams

There will be two exams, a midterm and a final. Both exams will be computerized and closed book. They will also be proctored. You are responsible for arranging an acceptable proctor. Please see Proctor Policy below for details. The midterm exam covers Chapters 1 – 8, and it is made up of  30 questions that are true/false and multiple choice. The final exam covers Chapters 9 – 16.  It will be 30 questions, true/false and multiple choice. Both exams can be accessed through the Quizzes area of the course, and your proctor will be given the password.

Note for All Assignments

Recycled work is not allowed to be submitted in this class.  If you wrote a paper on a similar topic and submitted it in another class it will show up in the TurnItIn tool and will highlight the recycled work.  This is called self-plagiarism and is not allowed.  

Also, limit your quoted material to less than 10% of the total content of the paper.  The instructor is looking for original work and thought so heavy use of properly quoted material (over 10%) will result in points being deducted.  The reduction is not as heavy as plagiarized work but reduced originality does result in reduced points.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Computer System Basics and Introduction to Operating Systems
Readings
Chapter 1 - Computer System Overview
Chapter 2 - Operating System Overview
Activities
Introductions
We are spending the next 8 weeks together so we should get to know each other.  Please introduce yourself in the topic that I have created for this purpose in class Discussion area.  Please share a bit more than just your name.  You may wish to include your profession; hobbies, interest in computers, and any other information that can help us get to know you a little better.
Discussion Topic 1

Identify and describe the 3 techniques for input/output operations.  If you had to select one for your new operating system, which would you choose?  Why?

Post your response by midnight Wednesday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by Friday to earn full participation.

Discussion Topic 2

Discuss the four major achievements made in operating systems.  Which do you feel is the most important advance that has been made?  Why? 
Or – Discuss an achievement in operating systems that you feel should be on the list and justify your belief that it should be added to the list of four in the book.

Post your response by midnight Friday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by the end of the week to earn full participation.

Info Post Discussion 1
Share your response to one of the Info Posts by midnight Sunday.  (Requirements are explained in the Assignment Overview portion of this syllabus)
Chapter Question 1

Discuss three objectives of an operating system design for multiprocess and multicore systems.

Please submit your assignment to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox area of the course by midnight Sunday.

Paper 1
Begin working on Paper 1, which will be due in Week 4. The topic for this paper is listed under Week 4.
Week 2: Processes
Readings
Chapter 3 – Process Description and Control
Chapter 4 – Threads, SMP, and Microkernels
Discussion Topic 3

Describe the 5-State Process Model.  Why is each activity important?  To wrap up your discussion, describe at least 3 reasons processes are terminated.

Post your response by midnight Wednesday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by Friday to earn full participation.

Discussion Topic 4

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the two types of thread implementations. Is it better for an operating system to combine the two implementations? Why or why not?

Post your response by midnight Friday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by the end of the week to earn full participation.

Quiz 1

Quiz 1 (Chapters 1 - 4) is due by no later than 5:00 pm Central Time on Saturday.  You can take the quiz anytime between Monday and Saturday at 5:00 Central.

NOTE: There will be no extensions granted for missing the quiz deadline unless you have circumstances that will not allow you to take the quiz.  This must approved by the instructor and communicated in writing prior to missing the deadline.

Info Post Discussion 2
Share your response to one of the Info Posts by midnight Sunday.  (Requirements are explained in the Assignment Overview portion of this syllabus)
Chapter Question 2

Describe the steps that are taken by the operating system to create a process. Explain the activities in your own words as if  you had to describe it to a non-technical person.

Please submit your assignment to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox area of the course by midnight Sunday.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Concurrency
Readings
Chapter 5 – Concurrency: Mutual Exclusion and Synchronization
Chapter 6 – Concurrency: Deadlock and Starvation
Discussion Topic 5

Discuss four design issues for concurrency.  Order the issues from the most concerning to the least in your view.  Defend your choice for the issue of most concern.

Post your response by midnight Wednesday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by Friday to earn full participation.

Discussion Topic 6

Identify and describe the approaches for handling deadlock.  Why is it better to use a combination of approaches versus one?

Post your response by midnight Friday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by the end of the week to earn full participation.

Info Post Discussion 3
Share your response to one of the Info Posts by midnight Sunday.  (Requirements are explained in the Assignment Overview portion of this syllabus)
Chapter Question 3

Describe semaphores, monitors, and message passing.  How are they used to provide concurrency?

Please submit your assignment to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox area of the course by midnight Sunday.

Week 4: Memory
Readings
Chapter 7 – Memory Management
Chapter 8 – Virtual Memory
Discussion Topic 7

Discuss each of the memory management requirements.  Why is memory management essential for today’s computing systems?

Post your response by midnight Wednesday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by Friday to earn full participation.

Discussion Topic 8

Provide a brief description of 4 replacement algorithms.  Which do you prefer and which can you do without? Why?

Post your response by midnight Friday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by the end of the week to earn full participation.

Info Post Discussion 4

NO Required Info Post Discussion this week. Write your paper and study for the Exam!!  (Feel free to share posts in the Info Post section if you wish)

Paper 1

Please submit Paper #1 to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox area of the course by midnight Sunday. The topic is below.

  • Provide a brief history of Windows, Linux, MacOS, and a mobile OS (iOS, Windows Phone or Android).
  • Explain the factors that users should consider when selecting an operating system for their personal computers and mobile devices.
Midterm Exam (Chapters 1-8)
You may take the Exam any time Monday thru Sunday as coordinated with your proctor. Please make sure you coordinate to complete the exam No Later than 11:59 pm Central Time on Sunday. Remember, the exam is closed book.
Week 5: The Scheduling
Readings
Chapter 9 – Uni-processor Scheduling
Chapter 10 – Multiprocessor and Real-Time Scheduling
Discussion Topic 9

Select a scheduling policy that would be your choice for an operating system. Describe how it works and why you selected it for your operating system.

Post your response by midnight Wednesday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by Friday to earn full participation.

Discussion Topic 10

Discuss the 3 design issues for scheduling on a multiprocessor system.

Post your response by midnight Friday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by the end of the week to earn full participation.

Info Post Discussion 4
Share your response to one of the Info Posts by midnight Sunday.  (Requirements are explained in the Assignment Overview portion of this syllabus)
Chapter Question 4

Select two (do not use the one you selected in this week’s first discussion question) of the following forms of scheduling and provide a description and explanation of what value each form of scheduling brings to the system: first come first served, round robin, shortest process next, shortest remaining time, highest response ratio next, feedback.

Please submit your assignment to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox area of the course by midnight Sunday.

Paper 2
Begin working on Paper 2, that will be due in Week 8.  The topic for this paper is listed under Week 8.
Week 6: Disks and I/O
Readings
Chapter 11 – I/O Management and Disk Scheduling
Chapter 12 – File Management 
Discussion Topic 11

Discuss the 4 types of I/O buffering.  Why is buffering important?

Post your response by midnight Wednesday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by Friday to earn full participation.

Discussion Topic 12

Discuss methods for file allocation.  Why is it important to manage the disk’s free space?

Post your response by midnight Friday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by the end of the week to earn full participation.

Quiz 2
Quiz  2 (Chapters 9 - 12) is due by no later than 5:00 pm Central Time on Saturday.  You can take the quiz anytime between Monday and Saturday at 5:00 Central.  

NOTE: There will be no extensions granted for missing the quiz deadline unless you have circumstances that will not allow you to take the quiz.  This must approved by me and communicated to me  in writing prior to missing the deadline.
Info Post Discussion 5
Share your response to one of the Info Posts by midnight Sunday.  (Requirements are explained in the Assignment Overview portion of this syllabus)
Chapter Question 5

Briefly define the 7 RAID levels.  Which level would be best used by your current or previous employer?  

Please submit your assignment to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox area of the course by midnight Sunday.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Embedded Operating Systems and Virtual Environments
Readings
Chapter 13 – Embedded Operating Systems
Chapter 14 – Virtual Machines
Discussion Topic 13

Describe the characteristics of embedded operating systems.  Discuss some uses for these operating systems.

Post your response by midnight Wednesday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by Friday to earn full participation.

Discussion Topic 14

Discuss the approaches to virtualization.  Why is a virtual environment an advantage to an organization?

Post your response by midnight Friday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by the end of the week to earn full participation.

Info Post Discussion 6
Share your response to one of the Info Posts by midnight Sunday.  (Requirements are explained in the Assignment Overview portion of this syllabus)
Chapter Question 6

Describe TinyOS and share some implementations of this operating system.  

Please submit your assignment to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox area of the course by midnight Sunday.

Week 8: Security and Distributed Processing
Readings
Chapter 15 – Operating System Security
Chapter 16 – Distributed Processing, Client/Server, and Clusters
Discussion Topic 15

Describe the 3 Access Control Policies.  Are these effective in securing our systems?  What would you do to improve them?

Post your response by midnight Wednesday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by Friday to earn full participation.

Discussion Topic 16

Discuss Client/Server Computing.  Make sure to touch on the importance of the network in this environment. 

Post your response by midnight Friday.  Make sure that you have posted at least two other responses to your peers or instructor by the end of the week to earn full participation.

Info Post Discussion 7

NO Required Info Post Discussion this week. Write your paper and study for the Exam!!  (Feel free to share posts in the Info Post section if you wish) 

Paper 2

Please submit Paper 2 to the appropriate folder in the Dropbox area of the course by midnight Friday. The topic is below.

Describe the following categories of operating systems:

  • Stand Alone (Single User)
  • Network (Multi-user)
  • Embedded

Include several examples of manufacturers of operating systems in each of these categories.

Include several examples of platforms (systems) that use each of these operating systems.

Final Exam (Chapters 9-16)
You may take the Exam any time Monday thru Saturday as coordinated with your proctor. Please make sure you coordinate to complete the exam No Later than 11:59 pm Central Time on Saturday. Remember, the exam is closed book.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

No late assignments will be accepted without extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the student and with instructor notification prior to the due date (Columbia College Catalog).  

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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