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Online classes

Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

BIOL 102: Introduction To Anatomy And Physiology

Course Description

This course provides future health professional students with an introductory exploration of the human body’s structure, function and disease. Students will gain an understanding of chemical compounds and cell components that exist in the human body. The mechanisms of disease will also be explored. All human organ systems will be examined for their structure, function and common disorders.   

Prerequisite: none

Proctored Exams: Midterm and Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Patton and Thibodeau. (2017). The Human Body in Health and Disease (7th ed). Elsevier.
    • [ISBN-9780323402118]
  • Swisher, Patton, Thibodeau. (2017). Study Guide for The Human Body in Health and Disease (7th ed). Elsevier.
    • [ISBN-9780323402941]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the structure and function of the human body. The basics of the eleven systems of the body will be covered; integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic and immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive. The relationship between structure and function will be emphasized as will interrelationships among all the systems. Focus on physiological functions in order to maintain overall homeostasis will be detailed. Mechanisms of disease/disorder in all systems will be covered as will etiology of specific pathologies.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe the difference between anatomy, physiology, and pathology
  2. Distinguish between organic and inorganic chemical compounds
  3. Identify three major components of a cell
  4. Explain the difference between an organ and an organ system in the body
  5. Describe the mechanisms of disease and risk factors associated with disease
  6. Discuss the structure and function of all human organ systems
  7. Describe the metabolic roles of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals
  8. Relate the role and importance of homeostasis in body function
  9. Discuss the major developmental changes characteristic of the life-span
  10. Explain the mechanisms of genetic disease

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (15) 180 18%
Worksheets (4) 160 16%
Quizzes (6) 180 18%
Midterm Exam 240 24%
Final Exam 240 24%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Worksheet 1 40 Friday
Discussion 1 12 Friday/Sunday
Introduction Discussion 0 Sunday
Quiz 1 30
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 12 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion 3 12 Friday/Sunday
Quiz 2 30 Sunday
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 12 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion 5 12 Friday/Sunday
Worksheet 2 40 Friday
Quiz 3 30 Sunday
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6 12 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion 7 12 Friday/Sunday
Midterm Exam 240 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 12 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion 9 12 Friday/Sunday
Worksheet 3 40 Friday
Quiz 4 30 Sunday
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 10 12 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion 11 12 Friday/Sunday
Quiz 5 30 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 12 12 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion 13 12 Friday/Sunday
Worksheet 4 40 Friday
Quiz 6 30 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 14 12 Wednesday/Friday
Discussion 15 12 Friday/Saturday
Final Exam 240 Saturday
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Due Dates Notice

All due dates in the course refer to 11:59 pm Central Time on the day indicated.

Discussions

Except for the first week, there are two graded discussions weekly worth 12 points each. At least one response to either a classmate or instructor is required in each discussion.

  • Due dates for first weekly discussion are Wednesday for the initial post and Friday for responses.
  • Due dates for the second weekly discussion are Friday for the initial post and Sunday for responses. In week 8, the due dates for the second discussion is Friday and Saturday.

Initial posts must completely respond to discussion question(s), providing ample examples and details. To adequately address the topics, an initial post will typically be 3-4 well-developed paragraphs in length. The majority of your posts should be in your own words, with no more than two direct quotes allowed. Use APA style when citing references. 

Exception: In Week 1, there is only one graded discussion with the initial post due on Friday and responses due Sunday. There is also an ungraded Introductory Discussion with all posts due on Sunday.


Worksheets

Worksheets are Word documents containing a varied number of questions on the text readings that you must answer and submit to their respective course Dropbox. They are assigned in weeks 1, 3, 5, and 7. They are worth 40 points each and due on Fridays.

There are also two bonus worksheet assignments, one in Week 4 and the other in Week 8. These are due on Sunday of Week 4 and Saturday of Week 8 respectively. Each is worth 25 bonus points each. They are not required.

Worksheets will help reinforce concepts introduced and may be used as a study aid in addition to your Study Guide book.

 


Quizzes

There are six quizzes, one in each week except for weeks 4 and 8. Each quiz is worth 30 points and will consist of 18 multiple-choice, or T/F questions and one short-essay question. Quizzes are due on Sundays. They are timed at 40 minutes with a 1 minute grace period. You will be unable to make further changes after the grace period expires. Incorrect questions and answers to the multiple-choice or T/F questions are available after you submit your quiz.


Exams

This course has both a Proctored Midterm and Final Exam:

Midterm Exam

The proctored Midterm Exam covers material from weeks 1-4. It is worth 240 points and must be completed by 11:59 pm Sunday of week 4. It consists of 72 multiple-choice or T/F questions. It is timed at 120 minutes with a 1 minute grace period. You will be unable to make further changes after exceeding the grace period. Incorrectly answered questions will be viewable after submission.

Final Exam

The proctored Final Exam covers material from weeks 5-8. It is worth 240 points and must be completed by 11:59 pm Saturday of week 8 (the last day of class). It consists of 72 multiple-choice, or T/F questions. It is timed at 120 minutes with a 1 minute grace period. You will be unable to make further changes after exceeding the grace period. Incorrectly answered questions will be viewable after submission.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Molecules, Cells, and Mechanisms of Disease in the Human Body
Readings
  • The Human Body in Health and Disease: Chapters 2, 3, & 6
  • Lecture: "Protein Synthesis"
 
Worksheet 1
This worksheet covers chapters 2, 3, and 6. Download it, save your changes, and submit it to its respective Dropbox.
Discussion 1

This week we cover the basics of biology and chemistry. Answer the following questions:

  • Why do we have to have a solid understanding of biology and chemistry to fully understand anatomy, physiology, disease and overall health?
  • Pick one specific topic in both Chapters 2 and 3 and discuss how they relate to physiology.
Introduction Discussion

Introduce yourself in this discussion, giving us information about you that you are comfortable sharing. Questions you may answer are: Where do you live? What degree are you pursuing? How far along are you in your educational program? What are your concerns about this class?

Quiz 1
Quiz 1 covers chapters 2, 3, and 6 of your textbook.
Week 2: Tissues, Organ Systems, and Skin and Membranes
Readings
  • The Human Body in Health and Disease: Chapters 4, 5, & 7
  • Lecture: "Epidermis and Dermis"
Discussion 2
Choose one of the following: Epithelial, connective, or muscle tissue and explain which one of these three you feel is the most important to overall homeostasis and why. Include in your explanation features of the major structures found in each and the functions of specific structure types.
Discussion 3
Choose one disorder of the skin. Describe its etiology (cause of the disorder), how it affects the skin (specifically how it affects the structures of the epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis) and any treatments or cures available and how those work. Also, include any information on how or if this disorder affects overall homeostasis of the body. For this post, you can cite references if you want to discuss a skin disorder not mentioned in the chapter or go into more detail on one that is included in the chapter- but all the work on the answer must be in your own words.
Quiz 2
This quiz covers chapters 4, 5, and 7 of your textbook.
Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: The Skeletal Muscular Systems
Readings
  • The Human Body in Health and Disease: Chapters 8 & 9
  • Lecture: "Growing Bones: Bone Remodeling"
Discussion 4
You have to permanently lose one bone or small group of bones. Which would you pick and why? How would (or could) another system of the body compensate for the loss of that bone (or bones)? How would the loss affect overall homeostasis?
Discussion 5
 There are nearly 700 skeletal muscles in the human body. Why do you think there are so many? Do you think we could function in the same manner with half as many (why or why not)? Do you think if we had 1000 skeletal muscles could we improve or add functions we currently do not have, if so what would they be?
Worksheet 2
This worksheet covers chapters 4, 5, 7, 8, and 9. Download it, save your changes, and submit it to its respective Dropbox.
Quiz 3
Quiz 3 covers chapters 8 and 9.
Week 4: The Nervous System, Senses, and the Endocrine System
Readings
  • The Human Body in Health and Disease: Chapters 10, 11, & 12
  • Lecture: "Brain and Spinal Cord Organization"
Discussion 6
Your patient presents with absolutely no functioning pain receptors in any part of their body. Discuss why this might negatively impact overall homeostasis. Come up with a couple of ideas on how other processes or structures in the body may be able to compensate for this loss.
Discussion 7
Hypothesize why equilibrium is in the ear and give a detailed explanation. If you could pick any other structure used for equilibrium besides the ear, where would it be and how would it accomplish equilibrium?
Midterm Bonus Worksheet

This is an optional, bonus worksheet worth 25 points. It is due on Sunday if you wish to submit it.

Midterm Exam

The proctored Midterm Exam covers material from weeks 1-4. It is worth 240 points and must be completed by 11:59 pm Sunday of week 4. It consists of 70 multiple-choice, matching, or T/F questions. It is timed at 120 minutes with a 1 minute grace period. You will be unable to make further changes after exceeding the grace period. Incorrectly answered questions will be viewable after submission.

Week 5: Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, and Immune Systems
Readings
  • The Human Body in Health and Disease: Chapters 13, 14, 15, & 16
  • Lecture: "Hemodynamics"
Discussion 8
The cardiovascular system is composed of three major parts: blood, vessels, and the heart. Give three specific detailed observations on how the structure equals function for the cardiovascular system. In other words, how does the design of an organ or tissue directly relate to how it works?
Discussion 9

The lymphatic system is always discussed in conjunction with the cardiovascular and the immune system.

  • Hypothesize why there is a connection between the lymphatic and the cardiovascular and immune systems- (think structures and functions).
  • If a patient presented with a non-functioning lymphatic system, how might that affect their cardiovascular and lymphatic systems? Give one specific example for each system.
Worksheet 3

This worksheet covers chapters 13 through 16. Download it, save your changes, and submit it to its respective Dropbox.

Quiz 4
Quiz 4 covers material from chapters 13 through 16 in your textbook.
Week 6: Respiration, Digestion, and Metabolism
Readings
  • The Human Body in Health and Disease: Chapters 17, 18, & 19
  • Lecture: "Respiration, Digestion, and Metabolism"
Discussion 10

Respiration and the health of the respiratory system has a direct effect on the homeostasis of almost every other body system.

  • Pick one body system and give a detailed example of this.
  • Discuss a specific ailment/damage of the respiratory system and exactly how it would prevent/interfere with the normal function of another body system.
Discussion 11

The digestive system has a lot of working parts: esophagus, stomach, ileum, rectum, etc… Answer the following:

  1. Pick one specific structure of the digestive system and discuss how losing that structure would affect overall digestion.
  2. Also, discuss if there are any other structures that could compensate for the loss.
  3. And lastly, why did you pick that structure to lose?
Quiz 5
Quiz 5 covers material from chapters 17, 18, and 19 of your textbook.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Urinary System; Fluid, Electrolyte, and Acid/Base Balances
Readings
  • The Human Body in Health and Disease: Chapters 20, 21, & 22
  • Lecture: "Electrolyte Balance and Homosteostasis"
Discussion 12

The nephrons of the kidneys perform two very important functions: filtration and reabsorption.

  • Pick one of these functions and explain why you think it is the more important function and why.
  • Hypothesize another means by which the body could maintain homeostasis without that particular function of the nephron.
Discussion 13

The human body has many different fluid compartments (intracellular, transcellular, lymph, interstitial, and plasma).

  • Give specific examples of why pH is important to two of these compartments.
  • What would happen if the compartments you picked went acidic? What if it went alkaline?
Worksheet 4
This worksheet covers chapters 17 through 22. Download it, save your changes, and submit it to its respective Dropbox.
Quiz 6
Quiz 6 covers materials from chapters 20, 21, and 22 in your textbook.
Week 8: Reproduction, Growth, Development, Aging and Genetic
Readings
  • The Human Body in Health and Disease: Chapters 23, 24, & 25
  • Lecture: "Gametogenesis"
Discussion 14

Hypothesize why sperm is made in males from puberty until death but females have made all their gametes (ova) before they are born.

Also, give your thoughts on why females make much fewer ova than men make sperm.
Discussion 15

Pick one effect of aging and discuss why you think that structure or function has the aging effect it does.

Also, consider this: Currently in the United States, there are over 46.2 million people over the age of 65. It is suggested that by 2060 that number will increase to 98 million. Why do you think this age demographic is growing and where you think the future of geriatrics (the study of health/disease in the elderly) will be headed?
Final Bonus Worksheet

The bonus, optional worksheet is due Saturday if you wish to submit it. It is worth 25 points.

Final Exam

The proctored Final Exam covers material from weeks 5-8. It is worth 240 points and must be completed by 11:59 pm Saturday of week 8 (the last day of class). It consists of 70 multiple-choice, matching, or T/F questions. It is timed at 120 minutes with a 1 minute grace period. You will be unable to make further changes after exceeding the grace period. Incorrectly answered questions will be viewable after submission.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted. Other late assignments are also not accepted without instructor approval; verification of excuse may be requested.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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