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Online classes

Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

AMST 280: *American Political And Social Thought

Course Description

American political thought from the colonial period to the present using writings of notable political figures, scholars, and others. Cross-listed as POSC 280.

Prerequisite: ENGL 112

Proctored Exams: Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Dolbeare, Kenneth M. and Michael S. Cummings. American Political Thought. 7th ed. Washington: CQ Press, 2014.
    • ISBN-978-1-48330-771-8

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Welcome to American Political and Social Thought online. During the next eight weeks we will read and discuss many of the most important writings contributing to America’s political and social development. You will have the opportunity to explore the nation’s founding principles, the ideas supporting separation from England, the development of industrial capitalism and responses to that development, the movement toward liberalism and populism, and much more.


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To be familiar with major authors in American political thought.
  • To understand how ideas shaped American political history.
  • To analyze critically the development of ideas such as federalism, individualism, capitalism, etc. in American political and social thought.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Explain the significant contributions of specific authors and theorists to America's development.
  • Identify major trends in the development of American political thought.
  • Read and comprehend original sources relevant to American political thought.
  • Analyze critical issues relevant to American political and social thought.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (8) 120 12%
Response Papers (6) 120 12%
Quizzes (7) 560 56%
Final Exam (1) 200 20%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 15 Thursday/Sunday
Introduction 0 Sunday
Quiz 1 80
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 15 Thursday/Sunday
Quiz 2 80 Sunday
Response Paper 1 20
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 15 Thursday/Sunday
Quiz 3 80 Sunday
Response Paper 2 20
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 15 Thursday/Sunday
Quiz 4 80 Sunday
Response Paper 3 20
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 15 Thursday/Sunday
Quiz 5 80 Sunday
Response Paper 4 20
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6 15 Thursday/Sunday
Quiz 6 80 Sunday
Response Paper 5 20
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 15 Thursday/Sunday
Quiz 7 80 Sunday
Response Paper 6 20
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 8 15 Thursday/Saturday
Final Exam 200 Saturday
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

The discussions are intended to help you understand and analyze the reading material.

You must contribute an original response to the discussion topic by Thursday of each week. Your original post should be a carefully composed and edited reply to the topic provided. A good answer will require several sentences; a length of 250-300 words should capture an appropriate amount of material.

Then return to review the responses prepared by your classmates and post a substantive comment to the original posts of at least two of your peers. A substantive comment will do one of several things: ask a follow-up question (of your peer or of me), point out a potential problem in the reasoning offered (by the author or by your peer), describe a counterexample to a claim made (in the reading or by your peer), attempt to answer a question or a worry that your peer presents, etc. Again, compose and edit your comments carefully; 200 words is a good length for these follow-up engagements.

Remember that you are not allowed to post responses or comments on a topic after the weekly deadline has passed.

Please feel free to disagree with me or with other students in our online discussions. In fact I encourage you to develop your argument if you disagree with me or your peers!
However, be respectful. We will on occasion criticize ideas and arguments, but we will not personally criticize one another in this course. I have the ability to remove postings and will do so if necessary. That is always a last resort, however. Please understand that this warning is for the rare student who might become disrespectful. I enjoy teaching this class and want all the students to enjoy it as well.

Response Papers

Throughout the session, you will write six response papers. A question related to the reading assignment will be posted in the Content area of the course. You must submit a 1-2 page [that is, 300-600 word] response to that question in your Response Paper. Grades on papers will be based on content and writing, equally weighted. Therefore, half of the paper grade will be determined by the quality of response to the question and the other half will be based on the quality of writing

Quizzes and Final Exam

You will complete a weekly quiz during the first seven weeks of the course and a Final Exam during Week 8. The quizzes will cover the readings for that particular week; the final exam covers reading for Week 8, but is also comprehensive. The first seven quizzes will be taken via your own computer any time between Thursday and Sunday. These will be relatively short since they will cover only one week of reading assignments, and they will be timed (usually 45-60 minutes). The Final Exam must be taken with an exam proctor and you will have two hours to complete it. All exams are comprised of multiple-choice, short answer, identification, and/or discussion questions and are closed notes/closed book.

Exam Study Guides: Thorough study guides will be provided in the Content area each week to help you understand the readings and prepare for examinations. You should read the essays listed in the Assignments tab first (in the Content area) so you understand the basic arguments or ideas offered by the author.


Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Getting Started in the Class. Readings on the Colonial and Revolutionary Period
Readings
During the first week of class, become familiar with the course environment and tools available to you (Dropbox and Quizzes areas), including the e-mail capability. You are expected to check your CougarMail e- mail account on a regular basis.

• John Winthrop: The Little Speech
• Roger Williams: The Bloody Tenet of Persecution for Cause of Conscience and The Bloody Tenet of Persecution, Made Yet More Bloody
• John Wise: Democracy is Founded in the Scriptures
• Benjamin Franklin: Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind, the Peopling of Countries, etc., and Excerpts From the Great Law of Peace of the Iroquois Nation and The Albany Plan of Union
• Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists
• Benjamin Rush: An Address to the Inhabitants of the British Settlements in America, Upon Slave- Keeping
• Thomas Paine: Common Sense and The American Crisis
• The Declaration of Independence
Discussion 1
In the Weekly Discussions forum, answer the Week 1 Question. Your original response to this question is due by 11:59 p.m. Thursday. Return after Thursday and contribute substantial comments to the original posts of two of your peers. These comments are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Introduction
Introduce yourself in the "Introductions" forum found in the Discussions area, our "virtual classroom," by 11:59 p.m. Sunday. Please give us more than your name. Include your profession, hobbies, interest in the course, and any other information that can help us get to know you.
Quiz 1
Complete Quiz 1, which will be available in the Quizzes area from Thursday until 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Week 2: Creating a New Government for America
Readings
• The Articles of Confederation
• John Adams: Thoughts on Government, A Defense of the Constitution of The United States, and Correspondence with Abigail Adams
• The Constitution of the United States of America
• James Madison: Federalist Essays
• Alexander Hamilton: Federalist Essays
• Dissent of the Pennsylvania Minority
• Letter from Samuel Adams to Richard Henry Lee
• Richard Henry Lee: Letters from the Federal Farmer
• Alexander Hamilton: Report on Manufacture
• Thomas Jefferson: Notes on Virginia and First Inaugural Address
Discussion 2
In the Weekly Discussions forum, answer the Week 2 Question. Your original response to this question is due by 11:59 p.m. Thursday. Return after Thursday and contribute substantial comments to the original posts of two of your peers. These comments are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Quiz 2
Complete Quiz 2, which will be available in the Quizzes area from Thursday until 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Response Paper 1
Submit your Response Paper 1 to the correct Dropbox folder by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Development and Democracy
Readings
• John Marshall: Marbury v Madison and McCulloch v Maryland
• Orestes Brownson: The Laboring Classes
• Henry David Thoreau: Civil Disobedience
• Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions
• Frederick Douglas: Speech at the Anti-Slavery Association
• John C. Calhoun: A Disquisition on Government
• George Fitzhugh: Cannibals All!
• Abraham Lincoln: Speech on the Dred Scott Decision, Cooper Union Address, Gettysburg Address, and Second Inaugural Address
Discussion 3
In the Weekly Discussions forum, answer the Week 3 Question. Your original response to this question is due by 11:59 p.m. Thursday. Return after Thursday and contribute substantial comments to the original posts of two of your peers. These comments are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Quiz 3
Complete Quiz 3, which will be available in the Quizzes area from Thursday until 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Response Paper 2
Submit your Response Paper 2 to the correct Dropbox folder by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Week 4: Reconstruction and Industrialization
Readings
• William Graham Sumner: What Social Classes Owe to Each Other
• Edward Bellamy: Looking Backward
• Andrew Carnegie: Wealth
• The Populist Party Platform
• Robert Ingersoll: Has Free Thought a Constructive Side?, God in the Constitution, The Liberty of Man, Woman, and Child, and On Happiness as the Only Good
• Black Elk/John G. Neihardt: Black Elk Speaks
Discussion 4
In the Weekly Discussions forum, answer the Week 4 Question. Your original response to this question is due by 11:59 p.m. Thursday. Return after Thursday and contribute substantial comments to the original posts of two of your peers. These comments are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Quiz 4
Complete Quiz 4, which will be available in the Quizzes area from Thursday until 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Response Paper 3
Submit your Response Paper 3 to the correct Dropbox folder by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Week 5: The Rise of the Positive State
Readings
• W.E.B. Dubois: The Souls of Black Folks
• Emma Goldman: The Tragedy of Woman’s Emancipation
• Eugene Debs: Revolutionary Unionism
• Herbert Croly: The Promise of American Life
• The Progressive Party Platform
• Woodrow Wilson: The Meaning of Democracy
• Franklin Roosevelt: The Commonwealth Club Address
• Langston Hughes: Let America be America Again
Discussion 5
In the Weekly Discussions forum, answer the Week 5 Question. Your original response to this question is due by 11:59 p.m. Thursday. Return after Thursday and contribute substantial comments to the original posts of two of your peers. These comments are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Quiz 5
Complete Quiz 5, which will be available in the Quizzes area from Thursday until 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Response Paper 4
Submit your Response Paper 4 to the correct Dropbox folder by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Week 6: Liberalism from 1945-1980
Readings
• John F. Kennedy: Inaugural Address
• Martin Luther King: Letter From a Birmingham Jail
• The Port Huron Statement
• Betty Friedan: Our Revolution is Unique
• Christopher Lasch: The Culture of Narcissism
• Articles of Amendment Ratified and Articles of Amendment Not Ratified
Discussion 6
In the Weekly Discussions forum, answer the Week 6 Question. Your original response to this question is due by 11:59 p.m. Thursday. Return after Thursday and contribute substantial comments to the original posts of two of your peers. These comments are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Quiz 6
Complete Quiz 6, which will be available in the Quizzes area from Thursday until 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Response Paper 5
Submit your Response Paper 5 to the correct Dropbox folder by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Neoconservatism 1980-2006
Readings
• Ronald Reagan: State of the Union Address
• Economic Justice for All: Pastoral Letter on Catholic Social Teaching, and the U.S. Economy
• Glen C. Loury: Achieving the Dream: A Challenge to Liberals and Conservatives in the Spirit of Martin Luther King, Jr.
• Patrick Buchanan: Where the Right Went Wrong: How Neoconservatives Subverted the Reagan Revolution and Hijacked the Bush Presidency
• Winona LaDuke: All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life
• Craig and Marc Kielburger: Take Action: A Guide to Active Citizenship
Discussion 7
In the Weekly Discussions forum, answer the Week 7 Question. Your original response to this question is due by 11:59 p.m. Thursday. Return after Thursday and contribute substantial comments to the original posts of two of your peers. These comments are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Quiz 7
Complete Quiz 7, which will be available in the Quizzes area from Thursday until 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Response Paper 6
Submit your Response Paper 6 to the correct Dropbox folder by 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
Week 8: 2006 and Beyond
Readings
• bell hooks:  Feminism Is For Everybody:  Passionate Politics
• Craig Kielburger and Marc Kielburger:  Me to We:  Finding Meaning in a Material World
• Andrew Bacevich: Appetite for Destruction: Never Have so Many Shoppers Owed so Much
Discussion 8
In the Weekly Discussions forum, answer the Week 8 Question. Your original response to this question is due by 11:59 p.m. Thursday. Return after Thursday and contribute substantial comments to the original posts of two of your peers. These comments are due by 11:59 p.m. Saturday.
Final Exam
Complete the Final Exam by 11:59 p.m. Saturday. The exam will become available in the Quizzes area beginning Tuesday. You must take the exam under the supervision of a proctor.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Assignments and quizzes/exams will not be accepted late.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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