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Effective: Early Spring 8-Week 2017/2018

AFCS 101: Culture & Society Of Africa I

Course Description

An interdisciplinary survey of institutions, politics, cultures, and societies in Africa from roughly 1800 to the present (emphasis on the period following World War II). Course meets the multicultural graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: None

Proctored Exams: Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Davidson, Basil. The African Genius. Ohio University Press, 2004.
    • ISBN- 978-0-8214-1605-1
  • Thomson, Alex. An Introduction to African Politics. Fourth Edition. Routledge, 2016.
    • ISBN-978-1-138-78284-6

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Whether considering politics, ethnicity, linguistics or geography, Africa is without question the earth’s most diverse landmass. So how can it be that Africa is so often misunderstood and defined by stereotypes and vague generalities? In this introductory course we will look at Africa from an interdisciplinary perspective in order to understand the ways in which present ways of living in and thinking about Africa have developed from distinct historical, political, cultural, and societal contexts. In sum, we seek to expand our thinking about Africa by taking a longer and fuller view of the continent’s experiences.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To develop an understanding of, and appreciation for, the daily life of the culture.
  • To explore the development of cultural identity for the people.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the social, literary, political, and economic forces that create a culture.
  • Examine the birth, growth, and changes of a culture.
  • Participate in an intense study of daily life, politics, science, philosophy, religion, architecture, art, music, dance, etc.
  • Develop a critical understanding for what it means to have this cultural identity in relationship to other cultures.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions 250 25%
Research Paper 250 25%
Quizzes 240 24%
Final Exam 260 26%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introductions 10 Thurs/Sun
Discussion EQ 1 10
Discussion OLC 1 10
Discussion DT 1 10
Quiz 1 30 Sunday
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion EQ 2 10 Thurs/Sun
Discussion OLC 2 10
Discussion DT 2 10
Quiz 2 30 Sunday
Paper Topic Selection 10
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion EQ 3 10 Thurs/Sun
Discussions OLC 3 10
Discussion DT 3 10
Quiz 3 30 Sunday
Resource List 40
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion EQ 4 10 Thurs/Sun
Discussion OLC 4 10
Discussion DT 4 10
Quiz 4 30 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion EQ 5 10 Thurs/Sun
Discussion OLC 5 10
Discussion DT 5 10
Quiz 5 30 Sunday
Research Paper Rough Draft 50
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion EQ 6 10 Thurs/Sun
Discussion OLC 6 10
Discussion DT 6 10
Quiz 6 30 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion EQ 7 10 Thurs/Sun
Discussion OLC 7 10
Discussion DT 7 10
Quiz 7 30 Sunday
Final Research Paper 150
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion EQ 8 10 Thurs/Sat
Discussion OLC 8 10
Discussion DT 8 10
Quiz 8 30 Saturday
Final Exam 260
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Participation in all assigned discussion topics will improve performance on exams and may be considered holistically by the professor. Each week you must participate in three discussions:

  • Essential Question(s)
  • Deep Thought
  • Online Learning Center
Each week you will have at least 6 postings – 2 postings in each discussion (Initial posts are worth 4 points/replies to classmates are 3 points with References, Support, and Writing Mechanics worth 3 points).  Discussions are informal; however, you are still expected to communicate effectively and ensure that your posting is intelligible as well as original.

All discussions must take place in the Discussions area, meaning that uploading an attachment as your post will not count. Each discussion is set so that you must post your original thoughts before reading the posts of your classmates. Each week’s discussion will take place from Monday to Sunday, except for Week 8 which ends on Saturday, with your initial post due by 11:59 PM Central Time (CT) on Thursday and two responses to classmates due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday. During Week 8, the two responses are due by 11:59 PM CT on Saturday.


Assignments

Research Paper

This research paper requires you, first, to critically analyze primary sources and, second, to research related secondary sources.  Scholarship provides you with the opportunity to develop research and writing skills as well as to synthesize knowledge about an important subject.  Moreover, scholars of history not only discuss the matters of fact but also tell their stories with skill.

Week 2: Research Topic Selection

You can must choose a theme of interest to write a blank page research paper. You may choose your topic from Pre-colonial African history to the present.  It might also be helpful to approach your topic from the perspective of your academic major.  Keep in mind, for such a short paper it will be good to make your topic as specific as possible, so try to narrow it down to specific African countries, figures, events, ethnic groups etc. Once you choose your topic, it must be approved.  To obtain topic approval upload your topic to the Research Paper: Topic Selection dropbox located in the Dropbox area of the course.. 

Week 3: Resource List   

Submit a preliminary list of at least five quality sources (academic books, journal articles or news stories) for your paper from Columbia College library resources.  At least two of these must be primary resources at this point in your research.  Make sure you list your sources in proper MLA, APA or Chicago Style format.

Week 5: Research Paper Rough Draft

Make sure you have a first version of your research paper turned into the appropriate dropbox.  I will provide feedback for you to incorporate into your final version as quickly as possible.  Be sure to use the annotated research paper posted in the content section as a model for your own work. 

Week 7:  Research Paper 

We have a research paper that requires you, first, to critically analyze primary sources and, second, to research related secondary sources.  Scholarship provides you with the opportunity to develop research and writing skills as well as to synthesize knowledge about an important subject.  Moreover, scholars of history not only discuss the matters of fact but also tell their stories with skill. In order to earn full credit for this component score, you will submit a paper that:

  • Considers the controversial issue announced by the professor in the initial threads for conferencing.
  • Identifies at least 2 examples of primary sources (i.e., letters, diaries, publications) related to the issue.
  • Constructs a thesis statement based upon the examples.
  • Consults a number of additional secondary sources that help to develop a thesis.
  • Incorporates an introduction, body, and conclusion.
  • Organizes paragraphs with approximately eight sentences developing a single topic.
  • Elaborates major points with a degree of specificity.
  • Clarifies premises using coherent diction.
  • Avoids spelling errors, awkward language, improper grammar, flawed punctuation, and other technical mistakes.
  • Includes 4 to 6 pages of full typed text. 
  • Includes a bibliography, with at least 2 primary and 3 secondary sources listed separately.

All sections of the paper must be in a .doc, .pdf, or .rtf format. Your work should be double-spaced, 12-point sans serif font, with 1 inch margins all around.  When citing resources, you must adhere strictly to APA, MLA or Chicago style (although you will not be required to provide an abstract for any writing assignment in this course). All assignments must be your own original work and you are not allowed to turn in papers for this course that you have used previously for another course (even if it is from taking this very course during a previous session).  You are expected to write professionally with correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar, developing your topic and providing solid examples from our readings, your own research, or your own experiences to back up your statements.  All assignments above are due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday of the week they have been assigned.

 

A Note about the Texts: The main textbooks for this course, An Introduction to African Politics by Alex Thomson and The African Genius by Basil Davidson are considered Secondary Sources, which means that the author (or historian) has written his version of history based on interpretations of historical documents or primary sources. Primary Sources are documents that are used by historians to write about past events. These are such things as diaries, journals, letters, etc. that were written at the time the historian is studying.  More information regarding Primary and Secondary Sources is provided in the Content area.


Quizzes and Exams

Quizzes

Each week, you will complete a multiple choice quiz over the week’s reading material. Quizzes 1-7 will consist of various true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions.  Quiz 8 will consist of one essay question, which will help you prepare for the final.  You will have 35 minutes to complete each quiz. All quizzes may be found in the Quizzes area and are not proctored. You will only have one attempt to complete each quiz, so be sure to complete the weekly readings first. While the quizzes are open book, you will not have the time to look up all of the answers. Each quiz is due by 11:59 PM CT on Sunday of the week, except in Week 8 when the quiz is due by 11:59 PM CT on Saturday.

Exam

You will take a proctored, comprehensive final exam during Week 8 which will consist of various true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions from all of the assigned readings throughout the course.  You must provide your proctor information during Week 2.  Failure to schedule your exam with an approved proctor will not be considered as an excuse for not being able to take the exam. You will have 2 hours (120 minutes) to take the exam and will be given only one attempt.  You may not use your books or any other materials to assist you during this final exam.  The exam will open Monday of Week 8 at 12:01 AM CT and is due by 11:59 PM Saturday.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Impact of International Trade and Religious Expansion in Pre-Colonial Africa
Readings
Davidson: Part One: Africa's World
Introductions

To get started with the course, post a message in the “Introductions” posting on the first day of the course. Introduce yourself to our online community by writing a brief autobiography for your classmates.

Discussion EQ 1

What do you know and hope to learn about Africa? Are your initial thoughts about Africa largely a product of stereotypes? 

Discussion OLC 1
Visit the website Exploring Africa and review the page “Unit Two: Studying Africa through the Social Studies. Then, in the Discussions area of the course, answer the following: What were some characteristics of pre-colonial African societies?  How did what you learned about Pre-colonial Africa compare to other societies you have studied?
Discussion DT 1
Inquiry Driven Discussion.  This discussion is student led.  Go to the discussions area for more information.
Quiz 1

The quiz this week will focus on your readings.  The quiz will consist of various true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions. You will have 35 minutes to complete each it. You will only have one attempt to complete each quiz, so be sure to complete the weekly readings first. While the quizzes are open book, you will not have the time to look up all of the answers.

Week 2: Formation of African Societies and Government and the Colonial Era
Readings

Thomson: Introduction: State, Civil Society and External Interests History, Africa’s pre-colonial and colonial inheritance

Davidson: Sections 5-8

Discussion EQ 2

What elements of pre-colonial African society continue to influence African politics today?  Which do you think is the most important?

Discussion OLC 2
What were the various consequences of European Colonization in Africa?  How did European rule change Africa politically, economically and socially?
Discussion DT 2
Inquiry Driven Discussion.  This discussion is student led.  Go to the discussions area for more information.
Quiz 2

The quiz this week will focus on your readings.  The quiz will consist of various true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions. You will have 35 minutes to complete each it. You will only have one attempt to complete each quiz, so be sure to complete the weekly readings first. While the quizzes are open book, you will not have the time to look up all of the answers.

Paper Topic Selection
You must choose a theme of interest to write a blank page research paper. You may choose your topic from Pre-colonial African history to the present.  It might also be helpful to approach your topic from the perspective of your academic major.  Keep in mind, for such a short paper it will be good to make your topic as specific as possible, so try to narrow it down to specific African countries, figures, events, ethnic groups etc. Once you choose your topic, it must be approved.  To obtain topic approval upload your topic to the Research Paper: Topic Selection located in the Dropbox area of the course.
Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Ethnicity and the Rise of African Nationalism
Readings

Thomson: "Ideology": Nationalism, Socialism, Populism and state Capitalism and "Ethnicity and religion": 'tribes', gods and political identity

Davidson: finish part II

Discussion EQ 3

Based on your readings, why have we moved towards an instrumental view of ethnicity?  Can you think of examples of how your ethnic identity has changed over time?

Discussions OLC 3

Choose any African ethnic group and summarize and differentiate their history and culture from other African culture(s).

Discussion DT 3
Inquiry Driven Discussion.  This discussion is student led.  Go to the discussions area for more information.
Quiz 3

The quiz this week will focus on your readings.  The quiz will consist of various true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions. You will have 35 minutes to complete each it. You will only have one attempt to complete each quiz, so be sure to complete the weekly readings first. While the quizzes are open book, you will not have the time to look up all of the answers.

Resource List
Submit a preliminary list of at least five quality sources (academic books, journal articles or news stories) for your paper taken from the Columbia College library resources page to the appropriate dropbox.  Make sure you list your sources in proper MLA, APA or Chicago Style format.
Week 4: Social Classes, Religion, and African Politics
Readings

Thomson: Social Class: the search for class politics in Africa

Davidson: Sections 10-13

Discussion EQ 4

Based on your readings, can we define social class in Africa the same we might here in the United States? What role do class play in African politics?

Discussion OLC 4
Watch Parts I and II of the UKTV documentary, Kwame Nkrumah: Black Power. Then, in the Discussions area of the course, answer the following: In what ways did Kwame Nkrumah attempt to achieve African nationalism in Ghana?  What kinds of powerful forces did African leaders have to deal with to achieve their goals?
Discussion DT 4
Inquiry Driven Discussion.  This discussion is student led.  Go to the discussions area for more information.
Quiz 4

The quiz this week will focus on your readings.  The quiz will consist of various true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions. You will have 35 minutes to complete each it. You will only have one attempt to complete each quiz, so be sure to complete the weekly readings first. While the quizzes are open book, you will not have the time to look up all of the answers.

Week 5: Foreign, Military Influence and Interests in Africa
Readings

Thomson: "Legitimacy: neo-patrimonialism, personal rule and the centralization of the African state”  and "Coercion: military intervention in African politics"

Davidson: Sections 14-17

Discussion EQ 5

To what extent can African military coups be explained by environmental (socio-economic/political culture) factors? In your opinion, which one the most influential and why?

Discussion OLC 5
Watch Parts I and II of the Fela Kuti documentary. Then, in the Discussions area of the course, answer the following: How did Fela Kuti use Afro-beat to address the political and social conditions of Nigeria's military dictatorship(s) and flawed Democracy during the 1970s and 80s?  Do you think music is an effective avenue for political change?
Discussion DT 5
Inquiry Driven Discussion.  This discussion is student led.  Go to the discussions area for more information.
Quiz 5

The quiz this week will focus on your readings.  The quiz will consist of various true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions. You will have 35 minutes to complete each it. You will only have one attempt to complete each quiz, so be sure to complete the weekly readings first. While the quizzes are open book, you will not have the time to look up all of the answers.

Research Paper Rough Draft
Make sure you have a first version of your research paper turned into the appropriate dropbox.  I will provide feedback for you to incorporate into your final version as quickly as possible.  Be sure to use the annotated research paper posted in the content section as a model for your own work.  
Week 6: Economic Challenges in a Global Age
Readings

Thomson: "Sovereignty I: external influences in African politics" and "Sovereignty II: neo-colonialism, structural adjustment and Africa’s political economy"

Davidson: Sections 18-20

Discussion EQ 6

To what extent has the international economy hindered Africa’s post-colonial development? In your opinion, which factor contributes the most heavily?

Discussion OLC 6
Watch the news story China-Africa Relations on VOA’s in Focus as well as the news story China Strengthens Ties and Trade with Africa. Then, in the Discussions area of the course, answer the following: Does China represent a partner for development or a replacement for European colonial powers? Why or why not?
Discussion DT 6
Inquiry Driven Discussion.  This discussion is student led.  Go to the discussions area for more information.
Quiz 6

The quiz this week will focus on your readings.  The quiz will consist of various true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions. You will have 35 minutes to complete each it. You will only have one attempt to complete each quiz, so be sure to complete the weekly readings first. While the quizzes are open book, you will not have the time to look up all of the answers.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Africa at a Crossroads
Readings

Thomson: "Authority: the crises of accumulation, governance and state collapse" and  "Democracy: re-legitimizing the African state?"

Davidson:  Sections 21-23

Discussion EQ 7

Why were so many multi-party elections contested in Africa during the 1990s?  How can Democracy help remedy some of Africa’s ongoing economic and social issues?

Discussion OLC 7
Watch the BBC clip, Nelson Mandela Released 1990, and the video, South Africa: Black Empowerment since the Apartheid?  Then, in the Discussions area of the course, answer the following: What was the impact of Africa's most powerful country becoming a multi-racial democracy? How did Mandela’s actions promote reconciliation between Blacks and Whites?
Discussion DT 7
Inquiry Driven Discussion.  This discussion is student led.  Go to the discussions area for more information.
Quiz 7

The quiz this week will focus on your readings.  The quiz will consist of various true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions. You will have 35 minutes to complete each it. You will only have one attempt to complete each quiz, so be sure to complete the weekly readings first. While the quizzes are open book, you will not have the time to look up all of the answers.

Final Research Paper

We have a research paper that requires you, first, to critically analyze primary sources and, second, to research related secondary sources.  Scholarship provides you with the opportunity to develop research and writing skills as well as to synthesize knowledge about an important subject.  Moreover, scholars of history not only discuss the matters of fact but also tell their stories with skill. In order to earn full credit for this component score, you will submit a paper that:

  • Considers the controversial issue announced by the professor in the initial threads for conferencing.
  • Identifies at least four examples of primary sources (i.e., letters, diaries, publications) related to the issue.
  • Constructs a thesis statement based upon the examples.
  • Consults a number of additional secondary sources that help to develop a thesis.
  • Incorporates an introduction, body, and conclusion.
  • Organizes paragraphs with approximately eight sentences developing a single topic.
  • Elaborates major points with a degree of specificity.
  • Clarifies premises using coherent diction.
  • Avoids spelling errors, awkward language, improper grammar, flawed punctuation, and other technical mistakes.
  • Includes four to six pages of full typed text circumscribed by one inch margins, making each double spaced page approximately 250 words and 25-27 lines with a standard type 12 point font.
  • Uses a documentation style guide consistently and correctly; see the MLA, APA or Chicago Style (University of Wisconsin) link available on the Course Home page for examples.
  • Includes a bibliography, with primary and secondary sources listed separately.
  • Meets the deadlines for drafts and revisions according to the Schedule of Due Dates table.
Week 8: Review Mechanisms of Change and Current Events
Readings

Thomson: "Conclusions: State and civil society in post-colonial Africa"

Davidson: Sections 24-31

Discussion EQ 8

Look back at your week one post regarding Africa and its stereotypes.  In what ways have the course materials influenced your thinking about Africa?

Discussion OLC 8
Review the slideshow about Zimbabwe’s President Robert Mugabe, “Time Photos: The Reign of Robert Mugabe”. Then, in the Discussions area of the course, answer the following: What concepts in the textbook characterize Mugabe's rule? Should the international community be doing more? Why or why not?
Discussion DT 8
Inquiry Driven Discussion.  This discussion is student led.  Go to the discussions area for more information.
Quiz 8

The quiz this week will focus on your readings.  The quiz will consist of one essay question that will prepare your for the Final Exam. You will have 35 minutes to complete each it. You will only have one attempt to complete each quiz, so be sure to complete the weekly readings first. While the quizzes are open book, you will not have the time to look up all of the answers.

Final Exam
We have one proctored exam, administered by a supervisor approved by the instructor (see Proctored Policy for more information). The exam consists of fifty (50) multiple choice questions earning 4 points per answer and two (2) essay questions earning 50 points per answer. You will have two hours to complete the exam. The exam is comprehensive. A study guide that will help you prepare for the exam will be made available on the course website.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Late quizzes and exams will only be accepted with prior approval of the instructor.

Research Papers submitted late will result in the paper’s grade being reduced by 15%.  Late assignments will not be accepted if they are more than two weeks overdue. Non-submission of a given assignment will result in a grade of 0 (zero) for that requirement.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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