Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

SOCI 331: Juvenile Delinquency

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  Course Description

Emphasis on sociological theories concerning the nature, sources, control, and prevention of juvenile delinquency. Topics include current trends in U.S. juvenile crime rates; media coverage of juvenile delinquency; patterns of victimization; characteristics of crimes committed by juveniles. Critical examination of current juvenile correctional policies and practices. Comparison of various treatment models in juvenile delinquency.

Prerequisite: Junior Standing

Proctored Exams: Final



  Textbooks

As part of TruitionSM, students will receive their course materials automatically as described below.

Required

  •  Fuller, J.R. (2016). Juvenile delinquency: Mainstream and crosscurrents (3rd). New York: Oxford University Press.  eText

Bookstore Information

Visit https://www.ccis.edu/bookstore.aspx for details.

eText Information

If a course uses an eText, (see Textbook information above) the book will be available directly in Desire2Learn (D2L) and through the VitalSource eText reader the Friday before the session begins, if registered for courses prior to that date.  Students will have a VitalSource account created for them using their CougarMail email address. Upon first login to VitalSource, students may need to verify their account and update their VitalSource password.  More information about how to use the VitalSource platform, including offline access to eTexts, can be found in D2L.  Students that would like to order an optional print-on-demand copy of eligible eTexts can do so through the VitalSource bookshelf at an additional cost.  Once orders are placed, it can take approximately five to seven business days for students to receive their print-on-demand books.

Physical Course Materials Information

Students enrolled in courses that require physical materials will receive these materials automatically at the address on file with Columbia College.  Delivery date of physical materials is dependent on registration date and shipping location.  Please refer to confirmation emails sent from Ed Map for more details on shipping status.

Returns: Students who drop a course with physical course materials will be responsible for returning those items to Ed Map within 30 days of receipt of the order.  More specific information on how to do so will be included in the package received from Ed Map.  See here for Ed Map's return policy. Failure to return physical items from a dropped course will result in a charge to the student account for all unreturned items.

Note: Students who opt-out of having their books provided as part of TruitionSM are responsible for purchasing their own course materials.

  Course Overview

This course is an overview of the issues relating to juvenile delinquency and the American juvenile justice system. Topics include how the juvenile courts are structured and operate, the law enforcement response to juvenile delinquency, and the system of corrections for juveniles. You will explore what constitutes juvenile delinquency and the ways delinquency is measured in the current system. You will examine the topic through the lens of sociological theories. Understanding the social influences on these issues can lead to greater awareness of delinquency and youth victimization.

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the historical development of the juvenile justice system.
  2. Identify the components of different theories of juvenile delinquency.
  3. Explain the role of family, peer groups, schools, and drug abuse in juvenile delinquency.
  4. Evaluate treatment programs for juvenile offenders.
  5. Describe the role of the police, courts, and the juvenile justice system in addressing delinquency.

  Grading

Grading Scale

Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (16) 320 32%
Research Paper Dropbox Assignments (3) 300 30%
Quizzes (6) 120 12%
Exams (2) 260 26%
Total 1000 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 2 20 Friday/Sunday
Quiz 1 20 Sunday

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 4 20 Friday/Sunday
Quiz 2 20 Sunday
Proctor Information N/A

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 6 20 Friday/Sunday
Quiz 3 20 Sunday
Dropbox Assignment 1: Annotated Bibliography and Outline 50

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 8 20 Friday/Sunday
Midterm Exam 120 Sunday

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 10 20 Friday/Sunday
Quiz 4 20 Sunday
Dropbox Assignment 2: Topic Exploration Paper 100

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 12 20 Friday/Sunday
Quiz 5 20 Sunday

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13 20 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 14 20 Friday/Sunday
Quiz 6 20 Sunday
Dropbox Assignment 3: Final Juvenile Research Paper 150

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15 20 Wednesday/Saturday
Discussion 16 20 Friday/Saturday
Final Exam 140 Saturday
Total Points: 1000

  Assignment Overview

Discussions

There are 16 discussion assignments in the course worth 20 points each. The first is an introductory discussion, and the remaining are topical discussions. You must post your initial response prior to seeing the other posts of your classmates. Initial posts should be at least 2 - 3 paragraphs (minimum 250 words), reflecting a solid grasp of the course content, and include original thoughts on the topic. You must provide substantive support for ideas and cite sources where appropriate. Use APA or ASA style for any citations in your discussion posts, and also include an APA or ASA formatted reference list at the end of your initial post. Initial posts are worth 15 points. The odd numbered discussion assignment each week has an initial post due date of Wednesday at 11:59 pm CT. The even numbered assignment each week has an initial post due date of Friday at 11:59 pm CT.

You are required to reply to at least 2 of your classmates. Response posts should be substantive, and approximately 1-2 paragraphs (minimum 100 words). If course content is tied in conceptually, then cite as appropriate. The 2 response posts are worth a total of 5 points. Response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday during Weeks 1-7, and by 11:59 pm CT Saturday of Week 8.

Research Paper Dropbox Assignments

There are 3 writing assignments for this course that culminate in a research paper related to juvenile delinquency or juvenile justice. With the exception of the first assignment, submissions should be written in essay-format; APA or ASA is the expected style.

Dropbox Assignment 1: Annotated Bibliography and Outline

Your first dropbox assignment will be a topic selection, annotated bibliography, and outline for your Juvenile Research Paper. In this first research component, you will submit a statement (single sentence is fine) of the research topic you intend to explore. You will provide an annotated bibliography (approximately 150 words per annotation) of the four required peer-reviewed resources. Your course text may count as one of those sources. Review the Content area for more resources on how to write an annotated bibliography and locating scholarly sourcing. After your annotations, you will provide a preliminary outline of your research paper. Be sure to reference the final Research Paper expectations as you develop this assignment. This assignment is worth 50 points.

Dropbox Assignment 1: Annotated Bibliography and Outline is due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday of Week 3.

Dropbox Assignment 2: Topic Exploration Paper

With this second dropbox assignment, you will examine, with scholarly research, the topic related to juvenile delinquency/justice you have chosen for your research paper, explaining the issue that is in need of reform. You will engage your sociological imaginations and include an analysis of the social issues that correlate to the topic and incorporate an explanation of the sociological theory (social structure, social process, subcultural or social reaction theories) that best applies to an evaluation of your topic. This paper should include a title page, abstract, and properly formatted reference list. The body the paper should comprise approximately 3-5 pages (750 – 1250 words), and this does not include the title page, abstract, and reference list. This assignment is worth 100 points.

Dropbox Assignment 2: Topic Exploration Paper is due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday of Week 5.

Dropbox Assignment 3: Final Juvenile Research Paper

This third, and final, dropbox assignment will build upon your second paper. After making any corrections proposed in feedback from previous draft submission, you will include additional focus and reflection upon policy suggestions for your chosen topic. The suggested policy change should be addressed within your scholarly research, be politically feasible as well as economically possible, and consistent with democratic ideals. The content should comprise a description of the social issue and an analysis of the issue reflecting correlating factors from research and sociological theory and present a proposal for policy to address the issue. The paper should include a title page, abstract, body of paper, and properly sourced reference list. The body of paper should comprise approximately 8-10 pages (2000 – 2500 words), and this does not include the title page, abstract, and reference list. This assignment is worth 150 points.

Your Dropbox Assignment 3: Final Juvenile Research Paper is due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday of Week 7.

Quizzes

There are 6 open-book quizzes that cover textbook chapter readings worth 20 points each. These quizzes consist of 10 multiple-choice items, and can be found in the Quizzes Area of the course. You are allowed 15 minutes, and 1 attempt, to complete each. Quizzes are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday during their respective weeks.

Exams

There is a midterm exam and final exam. Only the final exam is proctored. Both exams cover all course chapter readings, supplemental readings, or videos as assigned, and are available in the Quizzes area of the course. You will have 1 attempt, and 120 minutes, to complete each exam. Each test consists of multiple choice, true/false, and essay questions.

The midterm exam is worth 120 points, and covers Weeks 1 - 4. It will be open from 12:01 am CT Tuesday through 11:59 pm CT Sunday of Week 4.

The proctored final exam is worth 140 points, and covers Weeks 5 - 8. This exam is closed book, meaning no notes, textbooks, or other reference materials are allowed. It will be open from 12:01 am CT Tuesday through 11:59 pm CT Saturday of Week 8.

  Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Readings

Textbook: Chapters 1 and 2

Discussion 1

Introduction

Introduce yourself to the class. What is your occupation, what degree are you studying, where are you from, do you have any hobbies? What do you hope to gain from the course?

Briefly describe, from your own perceptions, some of the greater risks youth are facing today and we can explore these in more detail through the term.

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Wednesday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 2

Structural Influences

Review the 2.2 Case In Point from pg. 50 of your textbook. Considering the case Ex parte Crouse (1839), what are reasons to agree with the court? What are reasons to agree with the child’s father?

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Friday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Quiz 1

Quiz 1 covers textbook material from Chapters 1 and 2. It must be completed by 11:59 pm Sunday.

Readings

Textbook: Chapters 3, 4, and 5

Discussion 3

Schools of Criminology

In your opinion, which school of criminology is more practical to use for the types of delinquency in which today’s youth are involved? Be sure to support your examples with connections to the readings or outside research.

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Wednesday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 4

Juvenile Justice in Your Town

Find a local program that works with young people who are juvenile delinquents, juvenile victims, or youths at risk, and answer the following questions:

What is the program called? Is it private, public, or justice related? How is it funded? What is the program focus? Which theory would best align with the program’s goals and scope?

Be sure to make connections to the readings and provide appropriate sources for ideas from the readings or outside research.

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Friday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Quiz 2

Quiz 2 covers textbook material from Chapters 3, 4 and 5. It must be completed by 11:59 pm Sunday.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Readings

Textbook: Chapters 6 and 7

Multimedia

TEDTalk: Rachel Simmons – Resilience

Discussion 5

Integrated Theories

As Fuller noted, there is not a single “best” way to assess criminological behaviors. Which theory can help explain more of the scope of delinquency: Integrated Theory of Delinquent Behavior, Interactional Theory of Delinquency, or Control Balance Theory? In your own words, describe the theoretical orientation and justify your selection aligning with this perspective. Be sure to explain the link to the theories integrated within this choice and attribute sources as appropriate.

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Wednesday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 6

Girls’ Resiliency

After reading about Simmon’s “Odd Girl Out” (p. 225 in textbook) and viewing the TEDTalk with Simmons in the course content area, reflect on the 7.3 Crosscurrents from p. 231. Which factor most affects girls’ resilience against delinquency? Consider how girls’ delinquency compares to males’ delinquency, and the role of feminist theory. Propose one idea for helping equip girls at the individual level and one idea for helping equip girls at the structural level.

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Friday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Quiz 3

Quiz 3 covers textbook material from Chapters 6 and 7. It must be completed by 11:59 pm Sunday.

Dropbox Assignment 1: Annotated Bibliography and Outline

Your Dropbox Assignment 1: Annotated Bibliography and Outline is due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Readings

Textbook: Chapters 8 and 9

Discussion 7

Ethics Response

Read through the Focus on Ethics “Pierced” from p. 275 of the textbook. Consider the four proposed responses. How would you handle such a situation? What factors would you need to consider in your response? Can you propose any alternative responses?

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Wednesday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 8

Addressing School Violence

Is it more effective to address school violence by improving the school climate and the economic status of the community or by identifying and punishing those who engage in violent behavior? Justify your choice with the readings and one supplemental resource.

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Friday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Midterm Exam

The nonproctored midterm exam covers all course materials from Weeks 1 - 4. This 120-minute exam consists of multiple choice, true/false, and essay questions. The exam opens at 12:01 am CT Tuesday, and it must be completed by 11:59 pm Sunday.

Readings

Textbook: Chapters 10 and 11

Discussion 9

Gang Prevention

Create a top ten list of reasons why you believe individuals join gangs. Pretend you are in charge of public policy regarding gang prevention. What steps would you take and what elements would you implement to help kids avoid joining gangs? Be sure to tie to the readings and attribute sources as appropriate.

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Wednesday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 10

Reasons for Using

After reading through the explanations of “Why Do Youths Take Drugs?” in your textbook, present an argument for which of the four you feel is most pertinent to youth in American society today. Justify your choice.

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Friday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Quiz 4

Quiz 4 covers textbook material from Chapters 10 and 11. It must be completed by 11:59 pm Sunday.

Dropbox Assignment 2: Topic Exploration Paper

Your Dropbox Assignment 2: Topic Exploration Paper is due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Readings

Textbook: Chapters 12 and 13

Zimring, F.E. (2014). The power politics of the juvenile court transfer in the 1990s.  In F. E. Zimring and D. S. Tanenhaus, (Eds.), Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice (pp. 31-38). New York: NYU Press. (available through CC library, linked in Content area).

Discussion 11

Police Interrogations

Consider the three amendments to regulate police interactions (5, 6, and 14). Select one of the “Case in Points” or “Crosscurrents” from Chapter 12 and summarize the point:

12.1 – Haley v. Ohio (1948)

12.2 – Crosscurrents 

12.3 – Yarborough v. Alvarado (2004)

12.4 – J.D.B. v. North Carolina (2011)

Then, answer the “Think About It” prompts at the conclusion. Be sure to use the readings to support your position.

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Wednesday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 12

Trying Juveniles as Adults

Considering the purpose of the juvenile justice system, respond to the following questions with academic support. First, describe the three provisions to try juveniles as adults. Second, what four issues must be decided through a waiver hearing? Third, what are the advantages and disadvantages of trying juveniles as adults?

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Friday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Quiz 5

Quiz 5 covers textbook material from Chapters 12 and 13. It must be completed by 11:59 pm Sunday.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Readings

Textbook: Chapter 14

Thronson, D. B. (2014). A tale of two systems: Juvenile justice system choices and their impact on young immigrants.  In F. E. Zimring and D. S. Tanenhaus, (Eds.), Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice (pp. 83-93). New York: NYU Press. (available through CC library, linked in Content area).

Discussion 13

Restorative Justice

Read through the lecture found in the Instructional Materials on restorative justice, then respond. What do you think of restorative justice? Do you think it’s a helpful intervention? In what scenarios does it work best? What would be examples within juvenile justice where restorative justice would be ineffective?

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Wednesday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Discussion 14

Community Corrections

Describe the advantages and the disadvantages to community corrections for juvenile offenders. Which do you feel would best reduce recidivism of juvenile delinquents? Be sure to support your argument.

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Friday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Quiz 6

Quiz 6 covers textbook material from Chapter 14. It must be completed by 11:59 pm Sunday.

Dropbox Assignment 3: Final Juvenile Research Paper

Your Dropbox Assignment 3: Final Juvenile Research Paper is due by 11:59 pm CT Sunday.

Readings

Textbook: Chapter 15

 Maroney, T.A. (2014). The once and future juvenile brain. In F. E. and D. S. Tanenhaus, (Eds.), Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice (pp. 116-130). New York: NYU Press. (available through CC library, linked in Content area).

Zimring, F. E. and Tanenhaus, D.S. (2014). On strategy and tactics for contemporary reforms.  In F. E. and D. S. Tanenhaus, (Eds.), Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice (pp. 131-140). New York: NYU Press. (available through CC library, linked in Content area).

Discussion 15

Cross-Cultural Comparisons

Many countries in the world have a formalized juvenile justice system, but not all. Discuss how juveniles would be handled in this country today if we did not have a juvenile justice system. Describe some delinquency prevention approaches taken by other countries. Would these approaches work in the United States?

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Wednesday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Saturday.

Discussion 16

Policy Argument

In this discussion, describe the topic you selected for your research paper. Provide a brief background of the issue, and then greater detail describing the policy reform you advocated. Be sure to include the supports for your position. Considering the Zimring and Tanenhaus reading, do you feel this is a viable option for the U.S. juvenile justice system? Would it be applicable in other global systems?

Initial posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Friday, and response posts are due by 11:59 pm CT Saturday.

Final Exam

The proctored final exam covers all course materials from Weeks 5 - 8. This 120-minute, closed book exam consists of multiple choice, true/false, and essay questions. The exam opens at 12:01 am CT Tuesday, and it must be completed by 11:59 pm Saturday.

  Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a cumulative process that begins with the first college learning opportunity. Students are responsible for knowing the Academic Integrity policy and procedures and may not use ignorance of either as an excuse for academic misconduct. Columbia College recognizes that the vast majority of students at Columbia College maintain high ethical academic standards; however, failure to abide by the prohibitions listed herein is considered academic misconduct and may result in disciplinary action, a failing grade on the assignment, and/or a grade of "F" for the course.

Additionally, all required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Columbia College is committed to creating a learning environment that meets the needs of its diverse student body. If you anticipate or experience any barriers to learning, communicate your concerns with the instructor. In addition to speaking with the instructor, the following resources are available to ensure an opportunity to learn in an inclusive environment that values mutual respect.

  • For students with disabilities/conditions who are experiencing barriers to learning or assessment, contact the Student Accessibility Resources office at (573) 875-7626 or sar@ccis.edu to discuss a range of options to removing barriers in the course, including accommodations.
  • For students who are experiencing conflict which is impacting their educational environment, contact the Office of Student Conduct at studentconduct@ccis.edu or (573) 875-7877.
  • For students who have concerns related to discrimination or harassment based on sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy or parental status, please contact the Title IX Office at titleixcoordinator@ccis.edu. More information can be found at http://www.ccis.edu/policies/notice-of-non-discrimination-and-equal-opportunity.aspx

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

For this sociology class, late discussion posts are not accepted (this means that posts made after the original post-by date, even if within that week, will receive zero points). Late papers or exams are only approved with communication and mitigating circumstances. If late work is accepted, it may still receive a 20% per day point reduction. All course work and assignments must be completed by Saturday of Week 8.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.

  Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. If you have technical problems with the VitalSource eText reader, please contact VitalSource. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.