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Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

LACS 102: Latin American Culture And Society II

Course Description

This course continues a survey of the social, cultural, literary, and political history of Latin America. The course is designed to be taken in sequence with Latin American Culture and Society I as an intensive study of the Latin American culture and its people. Taking LACS 101 before 102 will greatly enhance your overall experience in this course. Course meets the multicultural graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: LACS 101 recommended/not required

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • De Jesus, Carolina Maria. Translated by David St. Clair. Child of the Dark: The Diary of Carolina Maria de Jesus. New York, New York: Mentor Book, Penguin Group, 1963. 2003.
    • ISBN-978-0-451-52910-7
  • Partnoy, Alicia. The Little School: Tales of Disappearance and Survival in Argentina. San Francisco, CA: Cleis Press, 1998.
    • ISBN-978-1-57344-029-5
  • The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo (DVD). PBS Home Video. Time: 90 minutes. , 2005.
    • ISBN-912889
  • Course Packet: LACS 102 Latin American Culture and Society II.
    • ISBN-1022101
      • Note: This course packet contains required readings for LACS 102.

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Welcome to Latin American Culture & Society online. This course delves deeper into the culture, people, politics, and geography of material covered in LACS 101. We will use film, literature, art, and music to explore cultural issues such as politics, gender, race relations, socioeconomic conditions, and emigration. Through examining these elements you will gain a better understanding of our southern neighbors and their many complex histories and diverse societies.  


Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To develop an understanding of and appreciation for the daily lives of this particular culture
  • To explore the development of cultural identities for this particular people

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Learn the social, literary, political, and economic forces that create a culture
  • Examine the birth, growth, and changes of a particular culture
  • Participate in an intense study of daily life, politics, science, philosophy, religion, architecture, art, music, dance etc
  • Develop a critical understanding for what it means to have a particular cultural identity in relationship to other cultures

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 360-400 90-100%
B 320-359 80-89%
C 280-319 70-79%
D 240-279 60-69%
F 0-239 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions & Responses (8) 120 30%
Quizzes (2) 80 20%
Research Paper (1) 100 25%
Short Essays (Cultural Explorations) (2) 100 25%
Total 400 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Introduction Assignment 0 Wednesday
Discussion #1 15 Wednesday/Sunday
Syllabus Quiz 10 Sunday
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion #2 15 Wednesday/Sunday
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion #3 15 Wednesday/Sunday
Plagiarism Tutorial Quiz 0 Sunday
Cultural Exploration #1 50
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion #4 15 Wednesday/Sunday
Paper topics, Outline, Sources 10 Sunday
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion #5 15 Wednesday/Sunday
Midterm Quiz 70 Sunday
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion #6 15 Wednesday/Sunday
Cultural Exploration #2 50 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion #7 15 Wednesday/Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion #8 15 Wednesday
Research Papers 90 Saturday
Total Points 400

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Students are required to answer two questions and respond to at least one classmate’s post each week.  You must answer a minimum of one discussion question of your choice by Wednesday of each week. The remaining question and response must be answered/posted by Sunday at midnight, except in week 8 when all discussion questions are due by Wednesday. Failure to post an answer to one question by Wednesday results in point deductions on the week’s discussion score. Students have until midnight Sunday night of each assigned week to post on the remaining questions in the discussion thread, except for Week 8 when all discussion questions are due by Wednesday. No late discussion posts will be accepted unless there are extenuating circumstances.  Answers to discussion questions and a response post are worth five points each. This means you have 15 points each week you can earn in the discussion section.

You should plan on posting each week under each thread. Each response should be thoughtful, substantial, and add to the discussion in a meaningful way by bringing up an original and relevant point. A response of “I agree” or “I like your answer” is not an adequate response post. If you use an outside source, other than the textbook, please document the source within the text of your discussion posting. You need to plan on following the progress of the discussion threads throughout the week so that you can participate in ongoing discussions. Refer to the assignment and grading tables below for point policy and due dates. Points=120

Written Assignments

Written Assignments will be graded according to the point system presented in the assignment table below. Your written assignments include two cultural exploration assignments (450-500 words maximum in length) and one long paper (800-1,000 words maximum in length).  I do not allow Wikipedia or amateur blogs to be used as one of your scholarly sources for any of your writing assignments. Recycled papers from previous courses are not permitted. All assignments to the Dropbox must be saved as Microsoft Word documents (.doc or .docx).  I cannot accept other file types (NO .wps, NO .txt); however, under some circumstances, I am able to accept .rtf documents.

Cultural Explorations

Cultural Exploration (CE) assignments (450-500 words) are worth 50 points each, assigned on the basis of percent of analytical and critical thinking skills, reasoning, completeness, correct spelling, correct formatting and citations, and neatness (e.g. avoid using contractions and passive voice). The reading requirement and questions for the CE assignments are found in the syllabus under the weekly headings and also online in the Content section of the course. A CE assignment should be written in short essay form (not question and answer format) with proper citations within the text and a works cited at the end of the essay. Essays should have introductory, supporting, and closing paragraphs followed by a reference/works cited section at the end of the paper. You are required to prepare CEs as a formal submission and place them in the Dropbox saved as a Microsoft Word document no later than Sunday at 11:59 p.m. central time.  Do not exceed the 450-500 word limit on cultural exploration assignments without prior approval. When formatting use one inch margins, 12pt. font, and double spacing throughout. Please use proper headings. Citations and reference pages should follow MLA, APA, or Chicago citation guidelines. Citations are your responsibility. No outside research or texts are required for CE assignments unless stated in the course schedule. Points=100 (2 @ 50pts. each).

Quizzes

There will be a syllabus quiz and a mid-term quiz. The syllabus quiz is worth 10 points. The midterm quiz is worth 70 points.  The syllabus quiz must be completed by Sunday of the first week. The Midterm exam occurs in week five and will consist of multiple choice and short essay questions. The quizzes are open book and note. All quizzes are computerized and timed. Points: 80

Research Paper

Research Paper (800-1,000 words), worth 100 points.  In this paper you will have the opportunity to conduct in-depth research and craft a critical essay that shows your understanding of a Latin American cultural concept, icon, figure, political or socioeconomic issue, etc.

Students should turn in an outline containing a tentative thesis statement, outline and four sources by Week Four. Papers completed in previous courses may not be recycled for this assignment. At least one of your sources must be from the course materials, the remainder may be outside sources. At least one outside source must be academic in nature. The outline is worth 10 points. Incomplete or underdeveloped outlines will not earn the maximum 10 points.


Research papers are due Saturday 11:59 p.m. central time of Week Eight. Students will choose a paper topic related to the material covered in the course. Students should utilize and cite at least four sources.


Please read and follow the instructions below when writing your paper. Failure to comply with any of these requirements will result in point deductions.
 
  • Papers must be 800-1,000 words in length, 12pt. font, double spaced, one-inch margins, and paginated.
  • Papers must include your name, course number, and paper title at the top of the first page and a clear thesis statement within the first two paragraphs.
  • Papers must include a reference page (not part of the word requirement). Citations should follow MLA, APA, or Chicago citation guidelines. Citations are your responsibility. Please visit Columbia College’s online writing center to learn how to cite properly. http://www.ccis.edu/departments/WritingCenter/writing.html
  • The purpose of this paper is for you to have the opportunity to conduct in-depth research and craft a critical essay that shows your understanding of a Latin American cultural concept, icon, figure, political or socioeconomic issue, etc.
  • Papers will be evaluated on your ability to demonstrate the following: level of comprehension, analytical and critical thinking skills, complexity of thought, logical progression of ideas, completeness, correct spelling and grammar, correct formatting, effective use of citations, and sentence structure/neatness (avoid using contractions and passive voice=weak writing).Grades will be based on the criteria stated above as well as the extent to which you explicate what the paper topic means to the identity of a nation(s) or people. Students are encouraged to assess their topics in relation to their own cultures. Points=100


Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Our Neighbors to the South
Readings

From Course Packet: Winn, Peter. Americas   pages 1-38
Map Puzzles Online:  Go to these websites and test your geography knowledge of the region.

South America http://www.yourchildlearns.com/mappuzzle/south-america-puzzle.html

Central America:http://www.yourchildlearns.com/mappuzzle/central-america-puzzle.html

Don’t forget to check out the supplemental information each week in the CONTENT section of the online course.
Introduction Assignment
In the “Introduction” discussion thread, introduce yourself to your fellow students. Please give your name, your major, your hobbies, and discuss any special interest you may have or experience you have had in Latin America.
Discussion #1
Post a contribution for this week’s discussion questions and respond to one classmate’s post. Answer at least one question by Wednesday of this week. All questions and responses must be completed by Sunday at midnight.

1. How has geography shaped Latin American history in regards to how it was colonized, where people reside, how the climate and landscape dictate what people grow and how they live?

2. Examine the statement by Peter Winn: “In diverse ways, the nations of Latin America and the Caribbean are moving beyond their traditional roles as bit players on the world stage to claim leading parts in its economic, political, and cultural dramas.”  Do you agree or disagree? Provide evidence from the reading to support your position

Syllabus Quiz
Read the syllabus and take the online Syllabus Quiz in the quiz section of the course. This quiz will test your knowledge of assignment due dates and requirements throughout the course.
Week 2: Culture & Society in Brazil Part One
Readings

Text: Child of the Dark: the Diary of Carolina Maria de Jesus  pages 1-7
From Course packet: Eakin, Marshal Brazil pages 103-142

Don’t forget to check out the supplemental information each week in the CONTENT section of the online course.

Discussion #2
Post a contribution for this week’s discussion questions and respond to one classmate’s post. Answer at least one question by Wednesday of this week. All questions and a response post must be completed by Sunday at midnight.
1. Describe the time period of Carolina’s diary. Which Brazilian president does Carolina often refer to? Where does Carolina live? What is the state of her economic condition in relation to the rest of the country? Be detailed and descriptive in your response. Use both readings (Child of the Dark and Brazil) to answer these questions.
2. According to Marshal Eakin’s description of the “ideal” Brazilian family structure, describe how Carolina’s family structure contrasts with Eakin’s description. How and why might Carolina have benefited had she been born into the “ideal” Brazilian family?
Week 3: Culture & Society in Brazil Part Two
Readings
Child of the Dark: the Diary of Carolina Maria de Jesus pages 80-159
Course packet: Eakin, Marshal Brazil pages 143-163
(use for both the Discussion and Cultural Exploration)

Don’t forget to check out the supplemental information each week in the CONTENT section of the online course.

Discussion #3
Post a contribution for this week’s discussion questions and respond to one classmate’s post. Answer at least one question by Wednesday of this week. All questions and a response post must be completed by Sunday at midnight.
1.  Based on Eakin’s explanation of traditional gender roles in Brazil, how do the gender role descriptions from Carolina’s diary compare to Eakin’s? In your answer explain various traditional and non-traditional gender roles that are evident in the diary.
2.  Excluding Carolina, choose two characters (one “favelado” and one “non-favelado”) from the diary. Explain who they are (race, education, work-life and family-life, if evident), their relationship to others in the diary and where they reside in Brazil’s socio-economic hierarchy.
Plagiarism Tutorial Quiz
Please complete the plagiarism tutorial quiz located in the quiz section of the course. Though no points will be given for completing this quiz, you will not be able to submit Cultural Exploration #1 until you receive a 100% on the Plagiarism quiz. You can repeat the quiz as many times as you need in order to earn a 100%.
Cultural Exploration #1

Write a response to the following questions in a scholarly way, using quotations and paraphrasing (don’t forget to cite the author and page number!).  Be analytical, think of the historical and cultural implications that support your answer and be detailed in your response. Submit to the Dropbox. Follow formatting instructions above under Writing Assignments (pg. 6 of syllabus).

How does Carnival serve to temporarily blur the boundaries of socio-economic conditions of Brazilian society? Explain what is meant by scholars who state that Carnival is a “release (letting go) of social tensions….which maintain the inequalities and social hierarchies for the rest of the year?” Support your explanation with external evidence from Carolina’s diary and/or Eakin’s writings.

Week 4: Dirty Wars: Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, & El Salvador
Readings
Partnoy, Alicia. The Little School. Pages 1-76
Required Reading: Argentina: The Dirty War, The Disappeared, The Mothers and The Grandmothers” by Professor Anne Barry. (Available in the course content area.)
Discussion #4
Post a contribution for this week’s discussion questions and respond to one classmate’s post. Answer at least one question by Wednesday of this week. All questions and a response post must be completed by Sunday at midnight.

1. Explain the political and economic circumstances that led to the military coup in 1976 which set the stage for the Dirty War.
2. Argentina was not the only country to experience a Dirty War in the latter half of the 20th century. Many other countries including Chile, Brazil, and El Salvador, to name a few, also experienced similar clashes between peasant groups, leftist movements and military regimes.  Emerging during this time period were movements and groups of women who protested the “state terrorism” in ways never before witnessed. Research online from reputable websites either of the following: the Arpilleras Movement of Chile or the Mothers and The Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo of Argentina. Explain their methods of social protest, their goals and accomplishments (including any current news), and what these movements tell us about civil society under military dictatorships.

Paper topics, Outline, Sources
Choose a paper topic. The topic must relate to subjects we are covering in this course (more instructions will be given in class). Develop a thesis statement and provide an outline along with a minimum of four sources (one must be course-related, the remainder may be outside, non-course sources, at least one outside source must be academic in nature). Please post these in the discussion section of Week Four titled “Paper Outlines” by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. central time. Points are deducted for incomplete or underdeveloped outlines. Papers submitted without the week four posting will automatically receive a 10 pt. deduction. The long paper assignment is due in Week 8.
Week 5: The Dirty War continued…
Readings
Partnoy, Alicia. The Little School. Pages 77-136
Osiel, Mark. Constructing Subversion. (Find in the Week Five Content section online.)
Visit: The Vanished Gallery Website (The hyperlink is in the discussion post section online Week Five Question #2.)
Listen to a short radio broadcast on the modern-day problems of Argentina’s stolen children. (Find in the Week Five Content section online.)
Don’t forget to check out the supplemental information each week in the CONTENT section of the online course.
Discussion #5
Post a contribution for this week’s discussion questions and respond to one classmate’s post. Answer at least one question by Wednesday of this week. All questions and a response post must be completed by Sunday at midnight.
1.  Osiel’s article strives to characterize the anti-subversive campaign led by the Argentine generals during the Dirty War. Using the readings from Partnoy, Osiel, and Barry, define the following in your own words: ideological subversive, terrorist subversive, and anti-subversive.
2.  Osiel argues that “victimization was intentionally arbitrary to a great degree” (125). Give an example of a victim or a “disappeared” of the dirty war that did not fit the subversive profile. Explore the website The Vanished Gallery. The definition of “disappeared” takes on a whole new meaning in Latin American cultures and societies where military juntas sought to eliminate subversive activity. How is “disappeared” defined in these societies and cultures? How does the website serve to heal the wounds of Argentine society?
Midterm Quiz
The midterm quiz is available to take in the Quiz section online between Wednesday and Sunday this week. The quiz covers material from Week One-Five.
Week 6: Culture and Society Through an Artist's Eyes Part One
Readings
Documentary Film: The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo (90 minutes).
Content Section: Cummings, Joe. “Diego, Frida and The Mexican School.”

Conduct research online to gain a better understanding of the artistic movement “Mexicanidad.”
Pomade, Rita. “Mexican muralists: the big three-Orozco, Rivera, Siqueiros."

Helpful Definition for this week’s readings:
Mexicanidad: realignment of national identity with Mexico’s indigenous and ancient heritage rather than its colonial and European past.”
Discussion #6
Post a contribution for this week’s discussion questions and respond to one classmate’s post. Answer at least one question by Wednesday of this week. All questions and a response post must be completed by Sunday at midnight.
1. 
Explain the impact of the Mexican Revolution on 20th century Mexican artists and the Mexicanidad movement. How did artists like Rivera and Kahlo let go of European influence in their art and reach out to the Mexican people?
2. 
Go online to: http://diegorivera.com/murals and/or http://www.fridakahlofans.com/paintingsyear01 and/or http://www.pbs.org/weta/fridakahlo/worksofart to explore paintings and commentary on Rivera’s and Kahlo’s art. What political, religious, cultural, and social references are embedded in their work?
Cultural Exploration #2
Please submit to the Dropbox. Follow formatting instructions, which you’ll fine in the syllabus page six under Writing Assignments.  Write a response to the following questions in a scholarly way, using quotations and paraphrasing (don’t forget to cite the author and page number!).  Be analytical, think of the historical and cultural implications that support your answer and be detailed in your response. Use a transition sentence to bridge your definition of culture with your second paragraph that begins the discussion of your chosen painting.
1. 
Read the definitions of culture in the Content Section. Considering these definitions, define culture in your own words, and place it as the first paragraph of your paper. Do not use an online dictionary or Wikipedia to define culture. I want to know what YOU think.
2.  Choose one painting from the websites listed in question #2 above that demonstrates elements of Mexicanidad. Identify the title, year, and theme of the painting, and paste it into your paper. Describe how Frida or Rivera expresses cultural elements, Mexican heritage and/or political implications in their art? How does it reflect or relate to the “maelstrom of revolution and culture” that encompassed the first half of 20th century Mexico?
Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Culture and Society Through an Artist’s Eyes Part Two
Readings
Course Packet: Deffeback, Nancy. 1992. “Frida Kahlo: Heroism of Private Life.” In Brunk, Samuel and Ben Fallaw, eds. Heroes & Hero Cults in Latin America. University of Texas Press, Austin.

Don’t forget to check out the supplemental information each week in the CONTENT section of the online course.

Discussion #7
Post a contribution for this week’s discussion questions and respond to one classmate’s post. Answer at least one question by Wednesday of this week. All questions and a response post must be completed by Sunday at midnight.
1. 
After the military phase of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) ended, how did Mexico’s government promote cultural renewal and national identity through the visual arts and communicate “the destruction of the old order and the establishment of a new order “ to the illiterate masses?
2.  Frida Kahlo painted during a time when men largely dominated Mexico’s post revolutionary art scene with vast murals depicting masses of people (largely males) “casting average workers, peasants, and soldiers in key roles” (Eds. Brunk & Fallow 173). In what ways did Kahlo’s artwork deviate from this masculine avant-garde esthetic? Why do Brunk & Fallow consider her a heroine?
Week 8: Week 8: North of the Border
Readings
Course Packet Winn, Peter. Americas pgs 584-646.

Don’t forget to check out the supplemental information each week in the CONTENT section of the online course.

Discussion #8
Post a contribution for this week’s discussion questions and respond to one classmate’s post. Answer all questions in the thread by Wednesday for Week 8.
1. 
Do an online search of a reputable news website on a current issue in Latin America. Summarize the article, pointing out cultural, historical, political, and social issues it addresses. Point out any connections the article makes to other cultures, countries, current events etc…or any relevance to what you’ve learned in the course. Be sure to identify the website and paste the link into your post.
2.  From the readings, an online search, or personal experience identify and describe a community in the United States that has been heavily influenced or shaped by Latin Americans. What are some of the cultural similarities or differences between this community and your own?
Research Papers
Long Paper (800-1,000 words), worth 100 points. Students should refer to the section Writing Assignments in the syllabus for instructions on writing your research paper. This information can also be found in the Content section of the online course under Week Eight/Paper Instructions. Papers are due in the Dropbox by Saturday 11:59 p.m. central time. If submitting a late paper, please refer to the Late Assignment Policy section of the syllabus for late penalty information.


Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Students submitting late work will automatically be penalized 20% for each day it is late unless there are extenuating circumstances. Late work is only accepted for dropbox assignments. No late exams will be accepted unless you contact me before hand and are dealing with conditions beyond your control. Extra credit work is not available.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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