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Online classes

Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

HUMS 390: Child Welfare

Course Description

This course begins with an historical overview of child welfare services in American society, establishes a framework for both policy and practice, and examines current trends in the field of child welfare. Special emphasis is placed on evaluating the needs of high risk populations of children/youth and families.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

Proctored Exams: None



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Crosson-Tower, C. (2018). Exploring Child Welfare – A Practice Perspective (7th). New York, NY: Pearson.
    • [ISBN-978-0134547923]

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

This course is designed to help future practitioners navigate the maze of children’s services and to use these services in a variety of fields. This is an upper-level course that will require you to be motivated and willing to spend the time needed to master the material and benefit from the course. If you are planning a career in human services or social work, this course will be a wise investment of your time because, regardless of your chosen area of concentration, you will frequently cross paths with child welfare issues.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • Explore the history and current trends of child welfare services in American society.
  • Explore the structure of policies, programs, and services in the field of child welfare.
  • Understand the process of intake, investigation, and risk assessment in child welfare.
  • Understand family-centered services and various treatment options.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Describe historical and contemporary trends in child welfare services.
  • Identify major federal legislation that shapes child welfare policy.
  • Discuss the roles, responsibilities and expectations of family.
  • Define and discuss various types of child maltreatment and neglect.
  • Identify and discuss factors related to the causes of child maltreatment and neglect.
  • Discuss the effects of abuse and neglect.
  • Assess risk of child maltreatment and neglect.
  • Explain developmental and familial considerations in assessing children-at-risk.
  • Explain the conceptual framework for family-centered services.
  • Describe and evaluate community social service systems providing services to children in need of protective services.
  • Explain the role and functions of juvenile and family court systems.

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 459-510 90-100%
B 408-458 80-89%
C 357-407 70-79%
D 306-356 60-69%
F 0-305 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (16) 160 31%
Essays (2) 150 29%
Exams (2) 200 39%
Total 510 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 10 Thurs/Sat
Discussion 2 10
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 10 Wed/Sat
Discussion 4 10
Essay 1 50 Sun
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 10 Wed/Sat
Discussion 6 10
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 10 Wed/Sat
Discussion 8 10
Midterm Exam 100 Sun
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 10 Wed/Sat
Discussion 10 10
Essay 2 100 Sun
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 10 Wed/Sat
Discussion 12 10
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13 10 Wed/Sat
Discussion 14 10
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15 10 Wed/Sat
Discussion 16 10
Final Exam 100 Sat
Total Points 510

Assignment Overview

Discussions

Each week’s discussion will take place from Monday to Saturday. During Week 1 only, your initial post is due by 11:59 PM Central Time (CT) on Thursday. For Weeks 2 – 8, your initial posts are due by 11:59 pm Central Time (CT) on Wednesday and 2 responses to classmates due by 11:59 pm CT on Saturday.

Initial posts should refer back to the reading assignment for the week, be substantive, and answer the question fully. Typical posts are 2 well-developed paragraphs. Any assertions that are made should be backed up with APA formatted scholarly, peer-reviewed citations. Grammar and punctuation will be considered when grading posts. All discussions must take place in the Discussions area, meaning that uploading an attachment as your post will not count. After Week 1, initial discussion posts received after the Wednesday they are due will earn no credit.

Your responses to others’ posts should also be well developed, fully explaining your response to the classmates’ posts. Make responses that add to the conversation and take it further; simply posting “I agree” or “good job” does not help develop ideas. For maximum learning and point benefits, respond to at least 2 students’ posts. Responses to peers' posts received after Saturday at midnight will not earn credit. Please do not post after Saturday at midnight.


Essays

Essay 1

In the second discussion question for Week 2, you are asked to identify a program in your area helping children and families experiencing poverty and provide a link to their website in your discussion post. Essay 1 asks you to familiarize yourself with this agency. Describe the mission of the agency, the population it serves, and the impact this this agency has on its community. You can directly quote the mission statement from the website or reading materials, but please do not use any other direct quotes. The purpose of this essay is to get you thinking about the services available in your area so you can utilize them when you are working as a professional.

Your essay must begin at the top of the page 1. Do not provide a title page or any lines of identifying information at the top of the first page, such as your name, date, professor name, class, etc. The essay should be 500 words, which is 2 pages, double spaced. Formatting of this paper must have 12-point Times New Roman font, 1” margins. Use APA format if you have any citations and a reference page.

Essay 1 must be submitted to the Dropbox by 11:59 pm CT Sunday of Week 2. No late essays will be accepted.

Essay 2

Essay 2 asks for your informed opinion about juveniles being tried as adults. After viewing the video, “Juvenile Justice,” and based on information you find in 2 scholarly, peer-reviewed journal articles, what are your thoughts? You might write about the consequences being different for adults and juveniles, the rehabilitation potential, the moral and ethical arguments, etc. Your content will not be graded on your opinion; it will be graded on how well you support your argument with the literature.

Your essay must begin at the top of the page 1 with a title on the first line. Do not provide a title page, abstract, or any lines of identifying information at the top of the first page, such as your name, date, professor name, class, etc. The essay should be 1000 words, which is 4 pages, double spaced. Formatting of this paper must have 12-point Times New Roman font, 1” margins. Make sure to cite the video and 2 peer-reviewed, scholarly journal articles in your essay. You are also to have 1 additional reference page. Your reference page must include links to the articles you cited within your paper. You are required to use APA format for your citations and reference page.

Essay 2 must be submitted to the Dropbox by 11:59 pm CT Sunday of Week 5. No late essays will be accepted.


Exams

The 2 exams for this course are not proctored. There is a Midterm during Week 4, and a Final during Week 8. Material for the Midterm is based on the book chapters from Weeks 1-4. The Final is not comprehensive, and is based on the book chapters from Weeks 5-8. There are 50 questions on each exam, and you will have 60 minutes to complete them.

The exams open on Wednesday at 8:00 am CT of weeks 4 and 8 and close on Sunday at 11:59 pm CT of Week 4 and Saturday at 11:59 pm CT of Week 8. Failure to take the exam during the assigned period will result in a “zero” on the exam.



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Children and Families: Then and Now
Readings
  • Textbook:  Chapters 1 and 2
  • Instructional materials located in the Content area of the course
Discussion 1

Please introduce yourself to the class. Let us know where you are from, and whatever else you are comfortable sharing. Also describe one of the Acts under the Advocacy in the Provision of Children’s Services in Chapter 1 of your text that particularly speaks to you. How does this legislation affect child welfare practices today?

Discussion 2

Your textbook describes the functions of family. Pick one function described in the textbook and expand on the idea. How can this function affect a child’s worldview? What cultural differences might a human service provider need to be aware of, in terms of family functions?

Week 2: Poverty
Readings
  • Textbook:  Chapter 3
  • Instructional materials located in the Content area of the course
Discussion 3

Describe the concept of food insecurity. Explain how it affects children. What developmental concerns are there for children who are not receiving proper nourishment? Describe what can be done about food insecurity.

Discussion 4

Describe the effects of poverty besides hunger. Identify a program in your area helping children and families experiencing poverty and provide a link to their website in your discussion post.

Essay 1

Describe the program you identified in the second discussion of this week in detail. How many people do they serve, what are the eligibility criteria, and what populations do they serve? Please provide the link to the agency website and reference your sources of information about this agency. Essay 1 must be submitted to the Dropbox by 11:59 pm CT Sunday. No late essays will be accepted.

Week 3: Violence and Addiction and the Effects on Children and Families
Readings
  • Textbook:  Chapter 4
  • Instructional materials located in the Content area of the course.
  • Katz, E. (2016). Beyond the physical incident model: how children living with domestic violence are harmed by and resist regimes of coercive control. Child Abuse Review, Vol.25:46-59.
Discussion 5

A human services professional is a mandatory reporter. She/he has information that a husband is physically abusing his wife. 3 children live in the home. Is the information about the physical abuse something the professional is required to report? Why or why not? Refer to the article provided and your textbook.

Discussion 6

Pick one type of gang and describe how a child might be initiated, and why gang membership might be appealing to a child. What protections are in place to prevent gang activity in your area?

Week 4: Child Abuse and Neglect
Readings
  • Textbook:  Chapters 7 and 8
  • Instructional materials located in the Content area of the course
Discussion 7

Describe some of the reasons people abuse children, according to your textbook and the videos for this week. How can knowledge about contributing factors of abuse help a human services professional work with someone who has been convicted of child abuse/neglect?

Discussion 8

Family preservation is the current model of child welfare services. According to your textbook, when is it in the child’s best interests to stay in the home, and when is it in the best interests of the child to place them outside the home? The Family Preservation has its pros and cons. Describe your thoughts about the family preservation philosophy.

Midterm Exam

This nonproctored exam is based on the book chapters from Weeks 1-4. There are 50 questions on this exam, and you will have 60 minutes to complete them. The exam opens on Wednesday at 8:00 am CT and closes on Sunday at 11:59 pm CT. Failure to take the exam during the assigned period will result in a “zero” on the exam.

Week 5: Children and the Juvenile Justice System
Readings
  • Textbook:  Chapter 9
  • Instructional materials located in the Content area of the course
Multimedia

Video:  "Juvenile Justice"

Discussion 9

What can a human services professional do to reduce the trauma of a juvenile court case? Write about two strategies for reducing trauma in the courtroom.

Discussion 10

This example is provided in your textbook:

“Jane, 14, is in 8th grade and lives with her mom, Mary, who is a disabled veteran, and her father, Frank, who is also disabled. They live in a trailer in the woods, which has electricity, water, and plumbing but is just barely habitable. Jane’s school filed a truancy petition because she has already missed 8 days of school and it is only November. When asked why Jane missed school, she replied that she needed to stay with her mother, who had suffered a recent stroke, while her father was undergoing chemotherapy. Jane said there was no one else who could take care of her mother.”

Describe what you would do if you were the human services professional in charge of this case.

Essay 2

After watching the video “Juvenile Justice,” write an essay about your opinion as to whether or not children (under 18) should be tried as adults in some circumstances. Essay 2 must be submitted to the Dropbox by 11:59 pm CT Sunday. No late essays will be accepted.

Week 6: Teen Pregnancy and Parenting
Readings
  • Textbook:  Chapter 10
  • Instructional materials located in the Content area of the course
Discussion 11

How does teen pregnancy differ for the mother and the father? Are societal expectations different now, as opposed to the 1940s? Explain your answer, using information from your textbook.

Discussion 12

Max, 17, and Jill, 16, have a baby. What services do you think they might need? What resources are available in your area for this family? Offer links to websites of agencies you find in your area that might help this family.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Adoption and Family Foster Care
Readings
  • Textbook:  Chapters 11 and 12
  • Instructional materials located in the Content area of the course
Discussion 13

It is 5:00 on a Friday night. You have been assigned a case where it has been determined that the children need to be moved into foster care immediately. Write about possible circumstances that would necessitate an out-of-home placement. What are the immediate and continuing responsibilities you have to the children, the birth parents, and to the potential foster parents while the children are in the foster care system?

Discussion 14

For this discussion question, we will discuss the rights of children in the adoption process. How has adoption changed from the 1800’s to now, in terms of the adoptee’s rights? Consider writing about open adoption, sealed adoptions, etc. What are your thoughts about the privacy rights of the parent/s who makes an adoption plan vs the child who is adopted and wants to know the identities of the birth parents?

Week 8: Residential Settings
Readings
  • Textbook:  Chapter 13
  • Instructional materials located in the Content area of the course
Discussion 15

Describe the history of residential treatment for minors and how current practices differ. What do you think has been a positive change?

Discussion 16

Consider this case from your textbook (p. 344)

“Harvey was a 15 year old with a long history of delinquent acts. He had been in and out of the court system since he was 10. When he pulled a knife on another student at school, he was arrested and again referred to the court. Harvey became out of control in the courtroom and threatened to “get that lousy kid who sent me here’ (the child on whom he had pulled the knife). Thinking Harvey was a safety risk, the judge sent him to a secure detention center until further plans could be made. From there Harvey was placed in a locked setting for delinquent boys.”

From what you have learned from this class, how might you intervene with Harvey? What are possible reasons a 10 year old acts out? Are there interventions that might prevent Harvey from continuing to break the law or is prison inevitable? Include citations from your textbook.

Final Exam

This nonproctored exam is based on the book chapters from Weeks 5-8. There are 50 questions on this exam, and you will have 60 minutes to complete them. The exam opens on Wednesday at 8:00 am CT and closes on Saturday at 11:59 pm CT. Failure to take the exam during the assigned period will result in a “zero” on the exam.



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late assignments accepted without prior permission from the instructor. Initial discussion posts received after the Wed they are due (after the first week) will earn no credit. No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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