Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

ENGL 242: American Literature II

Back to Top

  Course Description

 Survey of American literature from 1865 to the contemporary period.

Prerequisite: ENGL 112

Proctored Exams: Final



  Textbooks

As part of TruitionSM, students will receive their course materials automatically as described below.

Required

  •  Levine, R., ed.. The Norton Anthology of American Literature. Package 2: Volumes C, D, and E. 9th, New York: Norton, 2017.  eText

Bookstore Information

Visit https://www.ccis.edu/bookstore.aspx for details.

eText Information

If a course uses an eText, (see Textbook information above) the book will be available directly in Desire2Learn (D2L) and through the VitalSource eText reader the Friday before the session begins, if registered for courses prior to that date.  Students will have a VitalSource account created for them using their CougarMail email address. Upon first login to VitalSource, students may need to verify their account and update their VitalSource password.  More information about how to use the VitalSource platform, including offline access to eTexts, can be found in D2L.  Students that would like to order an optional print-on-demand copy of eligible eTexts can do so through the VitalSource bookshelf at an additional cost.  Once orders are placed, it can take approximately five to seven business days for students to receive their print-on-demand books.

Physical Course Materials Information

Students enrolled in courses that require physical materials will receive these materials automatically at the address on file with Columbia College.  Delivery date of physical materials is dependent on registration date and shipping location.  Please refer to confirmation emails sent from Ed Map for more details on shipping status.

Returns: Students who drop a course with physical course materials will be responsible for returning those items to Ed Map within 30 days of receipt of the order.  More specific information on how to do so will be included in the package received from Ed Map.  See here for Ed Map's return policy. Failure to return physical items from a dropped course will result in a charge to the student account for all unreturned items.

Note: Students who opt-out of having their books provided as part of TruitionSM are responsible for purchasing their own course materials.

  Course Overview

The objective of this course is to introduce you to “the second half” of American literature. You will gain an increased knowledge and comprehension of the genres, themes, and values that make up the literary part of the American cultural heritage, from the age of Realism, through the rise of modernism, up to and including the contemporary period in American writing. Readings will be drawn from a variety of forms and genres, including poetry, fiction, essays, and drama. In addition to reading works by major authors, we will also focus on the historical and cultural contexts of these works. Showcasing the diversity of American writing, the course features a rich introduction to major ethnic traditions in American writing, including African American, Chicano/Chicana, Jewish American, Native American, and Asian American literature.

  Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.

  Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify the periods of American literary history from Realism through the contemporary period.
  2. Identify major and some minor authors of these periods.
  3. Explain historical and cultural contexts of literary works.
  4. Write argumentatively about literary works.
  5. Apply the terminology of literary study to interpret works in multiple genres.

  Grading

Grading Scale

Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%

Grade Weights

Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (17) 250 25%
Literary Analysis Essays (3) 450 45%
Midterm Exam 150 15%
Final Exam 150 15%
Total 1000 100%

  Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1

Assignment Points Due
Introduction Discussion 10 Wednesday/Sunday
Discussion 1 15 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 2 15

Week 2

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 15 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 4 15
Literary Analysis Essay 1 150 Sunday
Proctor Information N/A

Week 3

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 15 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 6 15

Week 4

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 15 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 8 15
Midterm Exam 150 Sunday

Week 5

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 9 15 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 10 15
Literary Analysis Essay 2 150 Sunday

Week 6

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 11 15 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 12 15

Week 7

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 13 15 Thursday/Sunday
Discussion 14 15
Literary Analysis Essay 3 150 Sunday

Week 8

Assignment Points Due
Discussion 15 15 Thursday/Saturday
Discussion 16 15
Final Exam 150 Saturday
Total Points: 1000

  Assignment Overview

Discussions

There is a graded Introduction Discussion (10 points) in Week 1; initial post is due on Wednesday by 11:59 p.m. and two (2) responses to other students’ posts by 11:59 p.m. CT.  Besides the Introduction Discussion, there are sixteen (16) weekly discussions worth 15 points each. Each week you are asked to post an answer to the assigned discussion question(s), and post two (2) responses to other students’ postings in the appropriate forum found in the Discussions area of the course room. Discussion postings should be completed by 11:59 p.m. CT, Thursday and responses should be posted by 11:59 p.m. CT, Sunday of each week except Week 8 when the responses are due on Saturday, 11.59 p.m. CT. Your initial post should have at least 250 words and be in MLA style. It should reflect your engagement with the readings by including evidence from the texts in the form of quotations and paraphrases to illustrate your ideas. Your responses to posts by your peers should be substantial, at least 100 words each, and in MLA style. Also, include specific examples from the readings.

Literary Analysis Essays

In Weeks 2, 5, and 7 you will write literary analysis essays, advancing interpretative arguments about the readings of the course. The papers are due on Sunday, 11:59 p.m. CT of Weeks 2, 5, and 7. Each essay is worth 150 points and is 15% of your grade.

Requirements for all papers:

  • 3-4 pages in length approximately (1000 words).
  • in MLA format
  • Double-spaced
  • Times New Roman 12-point font and 1-inch margins

All papers must also be written specifically for this course in this session. Essays should not reference secondary sources. Present your own critical analysis of the readings in the course.

Exams

There is one (1) non-proctored Midterm Exam and one (1) proctored Final Exam in the course. Each exam is worth 150 points. The Midterm exam opens 12.01 a.m. CT, Monday and closes at 11.59 p.m. CT, Sunday of Week 4. The Final exam opens 12.01 a.m. CT, Monday and closes at 11.59 p.m. CT, Saturday of Week 8. The Midterm exam is based on the topics covered in Weeks 1 through 4 and you may have access to books and notes during the exam. The Final exam is based on the topics covered in weeks 5 through 8 and you will not have access to books and notes during the exam.  Each exam comprises 6 questions, including 4 passage identifications from the readings, 1 short answer question, and 1 short essay question.  You will have 120 minutes (2 hours) and only one (1) attempt to complete the exams.  You must submit the “Student Proctor Information Submission Form” to the Proctor Information Dropbox by the end of Week 2. This form and additional information about Proctoring is located in the Content area of the course. Each Columbia College site has its own hours and methods for handling proctoring.

  Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Readings

Levine, Norton, Volume C:

  • Introduction (1-16)
  • Mark Twain, “The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” “Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offences” (115-119, 331-340)
  • Henry James, “The Real Thing,” “From The Art of Fiction” (450-467, 961-963)
  • Sui Sin Far, “Mrs. Spring Fragrance” (909-918)
  • John Oskison, “The Problem of Old Harjo” (1102-1107)
Introduction Discussion

Please get to know each other here. Say a bit about yourself, your interests, your goals, hobbies, favorite books, and any other information you think is relevant.

Discussion 1

Realism in fiction: After reading the essays by Twain and James on writing fiction, compare and contrast their short stories as works of realism. Thinking about the perspectives of the characters in each story, is there one character in each story who seems to represent a Realist point of view, and, if so, how?

Discussion 2

Sui Sin Far and John Oskison: How would you describe the “problems” encountered by Old Harjo and Mrs. Spring Fragrance in the two stories you read by Sui Sin Far and John Oskison? What do you think it means to be “Americanized” in the context of each story?

Readings

Levine, Norton, Volume C:

  • Sarah Orne Jewett, “A White Heron” (pp. 516-523)
  • Kate Chopin, “The Storm” (pp. 544-548)
  • Charlotte Perkins Gillman, “The Yellow Wall-paper” (pp. 844-856)
  • Stephen Crane, “The Open Boat” (pp. 1048-1064)
  • Jack London, “To Build a Fire” (pp. 1113-1124)
Discussion 3
Women and Gender: Consider the main female characters in Sarah Orne Jewett’s “A White Heron,” Kate Chopin’s “The Storm” and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wall-paper.” How would you compare the situations of each character, and how would you describe their relationships with the men in each story?
Discussion 4

Nature and Naturalism: Compare the conflicts with nature that you see in “The Open Boat” and “To Build a Fire.” Why do you think all the characters in “The Open Boat” survive (except for one) while the main character of “To Build a Fire” does not? What would you say that nature represents in each text?

Literary Analysis Essay 1

Write an essay on no more than two of the readings from Weeks 1-2. Choose two works from different literary movements (realism, naturalism) and develop an argumentative analysis of how these texts depict any of the themes discussed so far in the course. Possible themes, among others, include:

  • Feminism or gender roles
  • Race, ethnicity and American identity
  • Nature and the individual

Your essay should have an argumentative thesis that clearly and specifically states how the theme you have chosen to focus on is depicted in the texts you are analyzing. Place your thesis statement as the final sentence of your introduction. Make sure you introduce the texts you are writing about in your introduction and use your thesis statement to explain how you interpret them specifically. 

A strong argumentative essay will:

  1. Analyze specific examples from the texts themselves, using quotations from the texts as evidence for your interpretation. Use close reading techniques to analyze the texts in detail, and pay careful attention to the specific genre of the text you are considering.
  2. Focus on a specific theme in your analysis. You cannot analyze every aspect of these texts so choose only the details and examples that allow you to explore your essay’s topic clearly and effectively.
  3. Present a thesis statement and analysis that tell us something significant about these texts that we might not have considered otherwise. Be ambitious in your analysis and tell us something interesting.

MLA style guides and a sample essay can be found under the Writing Resources tab in the content section.

Expectations:

  • The paper is due on Sunday at 11:59 p.m. CT of Week 2. It is worth 150 points and is 15% of your grade.
  • The essay should not reference secondary sources. Present your own critical analysis of the readings in the course.
  • Requirements:
    • 3-4 pages in length approximately (1000 words)
    • in MLA format
    • double-spaced
    • Times New Roman 12-point font and 1 inch margins
    • must be written specifically for this course in this session
Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Readings

Levine, Norton, Volume D:

  • Introduction (pp. 3-22)
  • Edward Arlington Robinson, “Richard Cory,” “Miniver Cheevy” (p. 29)
  • Robert Frost, “Mending Wall” (p. 220), “The Road Not Taken” (p. 230), “`Out, Out--” (p. 232)
  • William Carlos Williams, “The Red Wheelbarrow” (p. 288)
  • Ezra Pound, “In a Station of the Metro” (p. 297)
  • H.D., “Oread” (p. 332)
  • T.S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (pp. 355-358), “The Hollow Men” (p. 378)
  • E. E. Cummings, “in Just-” (p. 609), “Buffalo Bill’s” (p. 611)
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald, “Babylon Revisited” (pp. 646-661)
  • John Steinbeck, “The Chrysanthemums” (pp. 846-853)
Discussion 5

Modern Poetry: Compare and contrast the forms and styles of any TWO poems assigned for this week. The poems must be written by different authors.  How would you describe the differences between the forms of the poems you selected, and how might these forms reflect the themes and images of the poems themselves? What makes these poems different (or not) from traditional poetry?

Discussion 6

Modern Life: How would you compare the motivations of the main characters of Fitzgerald’s “Babylon Revisited” and Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums”? What are Charlie and Elisa really looking for, and why don’t they seem to be able to get what they want? Describe the image of modern life that is portrayed in these stories.

Readings

Levine, Norton, Volume D:

  • Introduction (pp. 3-22)
  • Claude McKay
    • “If We Must Die” (p. 470)
    • “America” (p. 471)
  • Zora Neale Hurston, “Sweat” (pp. 517-525)
  • Langston Hughes
    • “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” (p. 835)
    • “I, Too” (p. 836)
    • “The Weary Blues” (p. 836)
    • “Song for a Dark Girl” (p. 838)
    • “Freedom” (p. 841)
  • Countee Cullen, “Yet Do I Marvel” (p. 854)
  • Richard Wright, “The Man Who Was Almost a Man” (pp. 957-966)
Discussion 7

The Harlem Renaissance: Langston Hughes is usually thought of as the most famous poet of the Harlem Renaissance. Choose one of his poems and compare it with any of the poems by Countee Cullen or Claude McKay. What themes, style or images can you find connecting the poetry of the Harlem Renaissance?

Discussion 8

Hurston and Wright: Consider the two short stories assigned by Hurston and Wright as works of realism, naturalism and/or modernism. What features of the three major literary movements we have studied so far can you identify in each story? How does the use of realist, naturalist, and/or modernist techniques in each story reflect their main themes?

Midterm Exam

The exam consists of 6 questions, including 4 passage identifications from the readings, 1 short answer question, and 1 short essay question. It overs readings on the topics covered in weeks 1 through 4. The exam is worth 150 points. You will have only one (1) attempt and 2 hours to complete it. It is a non-proctored and open book exam. It opens 12.01 a.m. CT, Monday and closes at 11.59 p.m. CT, Sunday of Week 4.

Readings

Levine, Norton, Volume E:

  • Introduction (pp. 3-21)
  • Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman (pp. 218-286)
Discussion 9

The American Dream: Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman is often thought of as a commentary on the “American dream” in the post-war period. What do you think this play has to say about the American dream and its limitations? Describe the dreams of the main characters (Willy, Linda, Biff, Happy, etc.). What do you think they realize about their dreams by the end of the play?

Discussion 10

Watch the television adaptation of Death of a Salesman linked from Films on Demand in the lesson for this week. What choices does the director make in adapting the play, and what alternative choices could have been made? For example: what scenes are emphasized or left out, how is each character portrayed through dialogue or their actions, and how is the setting of the play shown or described to the audience? How might these choices reflect the director’s interpretation of the themes of the play? (In your response, you may decide which of these elements of the adaptation to focus on.)

Literary Analysis Essay 2

Choose one passage or paragraph (approximately 10-20 lines of poetry or 100-300 words of prose) from any one of the readings from Weeks 3-5 of the course. Write a close reading of this passage and develop an argumentative analysis of how you interpret this passage in the context of the work as a whole.

Your essay should have an argumentative thesis that clearly and specifically states how the theme you have chosen to focus on is depicted in the texts you are analyzing. Place your thesis statement as the final sentence of your introduction. Make sure you introduce the texts you are writing about in your introduction and use your thesis statement to explain how you interpret them specifically. 

A strong argumentative essay will:

  1. Analyze specific examples from the texts themselves, using quotations from the texts as evidence for your interpretation. Use close reading techniques to analyze the texts in detail, and pay careful attention to the specific genre of the text you are considering.
  2. Focus on a specific theme in your analysis. You cannot analyze every aspect of these texts so choose only the details and examples that allow you to explore your essay’s topic clearly and effectively.
  3. Present a thesis statement and analysis that tell us something significant about these texts that we might not have considered otherwise. Be ambitious in your analysis and tell us something interesting.

MLA style guides and a sample essay can be found under the Writing Resources tab in the content section.

Expectations:

  • The paper is due on Sunday at 11:59 p.m. CT of Week 5. It is worth 150 points and is 15% of your grade.
  • The essay should not reference secondary sources. Present your own critical analysis of the readings in the course.
  • Requirements:
    • 3-4 pages in length approximately (1000 words)
    • in MLA format
    • double-spaced
    • Times New Roman 12-point font and 1-inch margins
    • must be written specifically for this course in this session
Readings

Levine, Norton, Volume E:

  • Eudora Welty, “Petrified Man” (pp. 45-54)
  • James Baldwin, “Sonny’s Blues” (pp. 404-426)
  • Flannery O’Connor, “A Good Man Is Hard to Find” (pp. 449-460)
  • Phillip K. Dick, “Precious Artifact” (pp. 558-569)
Discussion 11

Post-1945 Fiction: The main characters of “Petrified Man” and “A Good Man is Hard to Find” are both limited by their stereotypes and preconceptions about others. How do you see these stereotypes portrayed in each story, and what do the characters’ preconceptions prevent them from seeing in each case? How are the points of view presented by the characters in each story shaped by issues such as race, ethnicity, class, or gender?

Discussion 12

Jazz and Science Fiction: In Baldwin’s “Sonny’s Blues,” jazz is portrayed as a form of expression closely connected to the history of racism and segregation. How would you compare or contrast what the narrator realizes about Sonny’s music at the end of “Sonny’s Blues” with Milt Biskle’s realization at the end of Dick’s “Precious Artifact”? What do you think each story suggests about the theme of human freedom?

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Readings

Levine, Norton, Volume E:

  • Toni Morrison, “Recitatif” (pp. 607-620)
  • Philip Roth, “Defender of the Faith” (pp. 644-666)
  • Sandra Cisneros, “Woman Hollering Creek” (pp. 1101-1109)
  • Sherman Alexie, “This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona” (pp. 1172-1180)
Discussion 13

Morrison and Roth: Morrison’s “Recitatif” and Roth’s “Defender of the Faith” can both be seen as coming-of-age stories about growing up. How do the main characters in these stories grow up (or not) by the end of the story? Note: Morrison’s “Recitatif” is written deliberately so that readers cannot determine the races of Roberta, Twyla, or Maggie. How does this affect the way that you view them as characters and how they develop in the story?

Discussion 14

Alexie and Cisneros: Cisneros’s “Woman Hollering Creek” and Alexie’s “This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona” are both stories that foreground specific places and the characters’ movements between them. Describe the function of the setting of each story and the roles of specific places for the plot of each story. Examples of specific places: Mexico, Texas, Eastern Washington, the desert, etc. What do these characters find as a result of their movements and migrations?

Literary Analysis Essay 3

Write an essay on one of the short stories assigned in the readings from Weeks 6 and 7 of the course. Use your essay to develop a close analysis of one text focusing on any of the themes and topics of the course.

Your essay should have an argumentative thesis that clearly and specifically states how the theme you have chosen to focus on is depicted in the texts you are analyzing. Place your thesis statement as the final sentence of your introduction. Make sure you introduce the texts you are writing about in your introduction and use your thesis statement to explain how you interpret them specifically. 

A strong argumentative essay will:

  1. Analyze specific examples from the texts themselves, using quotations from the texts as evidence for your interpretation. Use close reading techniques to analyze the texts in detail, and pay careful attention to the specific genre of the text you are considering.
  2. Focus on a specific theme in your analysis. You cannot analyze every aspect of these texts so choose only the details and examples that allow you to explore your essay’s topic clearly and effectively.
  3. Present a thesis statement and analysis that tell us something significant about these texts that we might not have considered otherwise. Be ambitious in your analysis and tell us something interesting.

MLA style guides and a sample essay can be found under the Writing Resources tab in the content section.

Expectations:

  • The paper is due on Sunday at 11:59 p.m. CT of Week 7. It is worth 150 points and is 15% of your grade.
  • The essay should not reference secondary sources. Present your own critical analysis of the readings in the course.
  • Requirements:
    • 3-4 pages in length approximately (1000 words)
    • in MLA format
    • double-spaced
    • Times New Roman 12-point font and 1 inch margins
    • must be written specifically for this course in this session
Readings

Levine, Norton, Volume E:

  • Audre Lorde, “Coal” (p. 685)
  • Michael S. Harper
    • “Dear John, Dear Coltrane” (pp. 769-771)
    • “American History” (p. 771)
    • “Martin’s Blues” (p. 771)
    • “`Bird Lives’: Charlie Parker in St. Louis” (pp. 771-773)
    • “Nightmare Begins Responsibility” (pp. 773-774)
  • Simon J. Ortiz, “Passing through Little Rock” (p. 818)
  • Li-Young Lee
    • “The Gift” (pp. 1122-1123)
    • “Persimmons” (pp. 1123-1125)
    • “Eating Alone” (pp. 1125-1126)
    • “Eating Together” (p. 1126)
    • “This Room and Everything in It” (pp. 1126-1128)

Natasha Trethewey, “Miracle of the Black Leg” (pp. 1189-1190)

Discussion 15

Contemporary Poetry: Compare the work of any of the contemporary poets assigned this week with any of the modernist or Harlem Renaissance poets assigned during Week 3 or Week 4. How do the modernists’ experiments with new poetic forms, styles, and themes continue to live in American poetry today? And how might contemporary poets be responding to the works of poets from the early decades of the 20th century?

Discussion 16

Conclusions: Choose your favorite poem assigned in the readings for this week and write an appreciation of the poem. Explain what you like about it and/or why it might be considered beautiful, using specific examples from the text. Why does this poem appeal to you both as a student of American literature and a person?

Final Exam

The exam consists of 6 questions, including 4 passage identifications from the readings, 1 short answer question, and 1 short essay question. It will cover readings topics covered in Weeks 5 through 8. It is worth 150 points. You will have only one (1) attempt and 2 hours to complete it. It is a proctored and closed book exam. It opens 12.01 a.m. CT, Monday and closes at 11.59 p.m. CT, Saturday of Week 8.

  Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a cumulative process that begins with the first college learning opportunity. Students are responsible for knowing the Academic Integrity policy and procedures and may not use ignorance of either as an excuse for academic misconduct. Columbia College recognizes that the vast majority of students at Columbia College maintain high ethical academic standards; however, failure to abide by the prohibitions listed herein is considered academic misconduct and may result in disciplinary action, a failing grade on the assignment, and/or a grade of "F" for the course.

Additionally, all required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Columbia College is committed to creating a learning environment that meets the needs of its diverse student body. If you anticipate or experience any barriers to learning, communicate your concerns with the instructor. In addition to speaking with the instructor, the following resources are available to ensure an opportunity to learn in an inclusive environment that values mutual respect.

  • For students with disabilities/conditions who are experiencing barriers to learning or assessment, contact the Student Accessibility Resources office at (573) 875-7626 or sar@ccis.edu to discuss a range of options to removing barriers in the course, including accommodations.
  • For students who are experiencing conflict which is impacting their educational environment, contact the Office of Student Conduct at studentconduct@ccis.edu or (573) 875-7877.
  • For students who have concerns related to discrimination or harassment based on sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy or parental status, please contact the Title IX Office at titleixcoordinator@ccis.edu. More information can be found at http://www.ccis.edu/policies/notice-of-non-discrimination-and-equal-opportunity.aspx

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted. Late assignments will normally not be accepted and will receive no credit. You may not submit written assignments late unless you have a health or family emergency and have made an arrangement with me; I reserve the right to request documentation of such emergencies.

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.

  Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Technology Solutions Center, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. If you have technical problems with the VitalSource eText reader, please contact VitalSource. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.