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Effective: Late Fall 8-Week, 2018/2019

BIOL 371: *Neuroscience

Course Description

Comprehensive survey of the physiological processes and structures underlying human and animal behavior, including sensation, movement, emotion, learning, memory, sleep, drugs, and abnormal behavior. Cross-listed as BIOL/PSYC 371.

Prerequisite: 6 hours of PSYC courses or 6 hours of BIOL courses

Proctored Exams: Final



Syllabus Contents

Textbooks

Required

  • Kalat, J. W.. (2016). Biological psychology (12th). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.
    • [ISBN-978-1-305-10540-9]

Note: It is strongly recommended that you do not purchase earlier editions of this textbook. Significant revisions and advancements in the study of neuroscience are reflected in the current edition. Also, avoid purchasing “international” versions of this text as several chapters may be omitted.   

Recommended

  • American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.
    • [ISBN-978-1-4338-0561-5]

Note: Be sure to purchase the current edition of the APA Publication Manual. Significant revisions in the use of APA style and format are reflected in this edition, compared with earlier editions.

MBS Information

Textbooks for the course may be ordered from MBS Direct. You can order

For additional information about the bookstore, visit http://www.mbsbooks.com.


Course Overview

Welcome to Neuroscience (BIOL 371/PSYC 371). This course examines one of the most exciting and fastest growing fields in psychology. In recent years, advances in neuroscience have significantly altered long-held assumptions, ideas, and beliefs about the brain and mind; indeed, about the very nature of human nature. In fact, all branches of psychology – and many other fields of scientific inquiry – are being profoundly impacted by neuroscience (also known as biological psychology).  During this course, we will survey the physiological processes that underlie human thoughts, feelings, and behavior. We will learn about human anatomy, the structures of the brain, and the central nervous system. We will study sensation and movement. We will learn about the importance of hormones and neurotransmitters, as well as sleep, hunger, and reproduction. We will explore the neuroscience of emotions. We will study the biopsychology of language, memory, cognition, attention, and how we learn. Finally, we will explore the biology of selected psychological disorders, such as the schizophrenias, bipolar disorders, and substance abuse.



Technology Requirements

Participation in this course will require the basic technology for all online classes at Columbia College:
  • A computer with reliable Internet access
  • A web browser
  • Acrobat Reader
  • Microsoft Office or another word processor such as Open Office

You can find more details about standard technical requirements for our courses on our site.


Course Objectives

  • To identify, define, and explain the physiological correlates of behavior and mental processes.
  • To produce a paper(s) in APA format and style.
  • To identify major brain areas and functions.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the background/history of neuroscience.
  • Identify the cells of the nervous system and their functions.
  • Describe how cells communicate (e.g. action potential, synaptic communication).
  • Identify structures and functions of the nervous system, including those for the major subdivisions (e.g. ANS), brain areas (e.g. hippocampus), and systems (e.g. mesolimbic system).
  • Perform brain dissections (Gross Anatomy) (can be virtual dissections).
  • Describe the biochemistry of neurotransmitters.
  • Describe how psychopharmaceuticals affect neurotransmission, mental processes and behavior.
  • Explain in vivo and in vitro technology used in neuroscience.
  • Explain the concepts and processes associated with at least 7 of the following topics: - Development of the nervous system - Movement - Vision - Audition - Body senses and chemical senses - Sleep and biological rhythms - Reproductive behavior - Emotion - Ingestive behavior - Learning and memory - Human communication - Neurological disorders - Schizophrenia, affective disorders and mood disorders - Substance abuse disorders - Developmental disorders (e.g., mental retardation, autism) - Stress disorders

Grading

Grading Scale
Grade Points Percent
A 900-1000 90-100%
B 800-899 80-89%
C 700-799 70-79%
D 600-699 60-69%
F 0-599 0-59%
Grade Weights
Assignment Category Points Percent
Discussions (7) 140 14%
Discussion Responses (24) 72 7%
Labs (8) 88 9%
Scholarly Paper 200 20%
Quizzes (10) 100 10%
Midterm Exam 200 20%
Final Exam (Proctored) 200 20%
Total 1000 100%


Schedule of Due Dates

Week 1
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 1 20 Wednesday
Lab 1 11 Friday
Discussion Responses 9 Saturday
Personal Introduction - Sunday
Quiz 1 10
Self-Assessment Quiz - Course Syllabus 10 Sunday, Week 4
Self-Assessment Quiz - Scholarship/APA Style 10
Week 2
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 2 20 Wednesday
Lab 2 11 Friday
Discussion Responses 9 Saturday
Quiz 2 10 Sunday
Proctor Information N/A
Week 3
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 3 20 Wednesday
Lab 3 11 Friday
Discussion Responses 9 Saturday
Quiz 3 10 Sunday
Week 4
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 4 20 Wednesday
Lab 4 11 Friday
Discussion Responses 9 Saturday
Quiz 4 10 Sunday
Midterm Exam 200
Week 5
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 5 20 Wednesday
Lab 5 11 Friday
Discussion Responses 9 Saturday
Quiz 5 10 Sunday
Week 6
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 6 20 Wednesday
Lab 6 11 Friday
Scholarly Paper 200
Discussion Responses 9 Saturday
Quiz 6 10 Sunday
Week 7
Assignment Points Due
Discussion 7 20 Wednesday
Lab 7 11 Friday
Discussion Responses 9 Saturday
Quiz 7 10 Sunday
Week 8
Assignment Points Due
Lab 8 11 Friday
Discussion Responses 9 Saturday
Quiz 8 10
Final Exam (Proctored) 200
Total Points 1000

Assignment Overview

Readings

Students are expected to complete each week’s readings and activities on time. Students will be required to read and review additional scholarly materials from sources such as professional journals, relevant books, multimedia sources, and reputable websites.


Discussion Assignments

Students are required to respond to seven Discussion Assignments (one each week, excluding Week 8). These assignments are intended to achieve course learning objectives through critical analysis and evaluation of relevant issues. As such, they require independent study beyond the textbook readings and the scholarly exchange of ideas with fellow students using the online classroom. These weekly assignments involve developing a response to one selected question with the use of theory (logical arguments) and/or research (empirical investigation). Discussion Assignments consist of demonstrating more than basic comprehension of principles, themes, and concepts. They require critical analysis and evaluation and/or advancing a position and defending and critiquing that position in accordance with standards of scholarship. Use of at least one scholarly source other than (or in addition to) the textbook is required. Citation of sources and general preparation of Discussion Assignments should follow general guidelines of the APA style. Students are advised to review the APA style of manuscript preparation at www.apa.org. Grading criteria for Discussion Assignments are provided in the Rubrics area of the course. Submit Discussion Assignments to the Discussion area of this course by Wednesday 11:59 PM, CT of the assigned week. [1 Discussion Assignment per week x 7 weeks x 20 points each = 140 possible points]  

Lab Assignments

Students are required to complete eight Lab Assignments (one each week).  These assignments are intended to achieve course learning objectives through “hands-on” exercises, practical experience, multimedia resources, and the participative exchange of ideas and information with fellow students using the online classroom. These weekly assignments consist of applied learning activities and do not require additional research or citation of references. Students are expected to participate in at least one selected exercise, and then share their ideas, opinions, experiences, thoughts, and reactions with other students. Grading criteria for Lab Assignments are provided in the Rubrics area of the course. Submit Lab Assignments to the Discussion area of this course by Friday 11:59 PM, CT of the assigned week. [1 Lab Assignment per week x 8 weeks x 11 points each = 88 possible points]  

Discussion Responses

Students are required to submit twenty-four Discussion Responses to Discussion Assignments, Lab Assignments, and/or Discussion Responses submitted by other students and/or the instructor. Three Discussion Responses will be graded each week. Students are encouraged to respond to more than three Discussion Responses each week to contribute to and promote ongoing dialogue, consonant with the learning objectives for this course. Students are invited to share their reactions, experiences, thoughts, and opinions, as well as ask follow-up questions that promote critical and/or creative thinking. Note that Students often express strong opinions and counter-opinions in these assignments; accordingly, comments are expected to be expressed ethically, responsibly, respectfully, and defensibly. Grading criteria for Discussion Responses are provided in the Rubrics area for this course. Submit Discussion Responses to the Discussion area of this course by Saturday 11:59 PM CT of the assigned week. [3 Discussion Responses per week x 8 weeks x 3 points each = 72 possible points]

Scholarly Paper

Each student is expected to write an original, Scholarly Paper, addressing a topic relevant to the course. You are encouraged to study and write about neuroscience-related topics and themes that are of interest and/or relevance to you. You are encouraged to discuss your topic ideas with your instructor via CougarMail.

The Scholarly Paper should demonstrate critical thinking skills commensurate with advanced levels of scholarship, such as evaluation, analysis and synthesis. Use of at least ten scholarly sources is required. The Scholarly Paper must follow current APA guidelines (refer to the APA Publication Manual and/or visit the APA website at www.apa.org for further assistance). The paper should be double-spaced, using a 12-point font size and a common font face, such as Times New Roman. The paper should be six pages in length, at a minimum, excluding the title, abstract and reference pages. Grading criteria for the Scholarly Paper are provided in the Rubrics area of the course. Submit the Scholarly Paper to the Dropbox area of this course by Friday 11:59 PM, CT of Week 6. [1 Scholarly Paper x 200 points = 200 possible points]  


Quizzes and Exams

Self-Assessment Quizzes: Students are expected to complete two (2) self-assessment quizzes, each consisting of 20 multiple-choice questions, during the first four weeks of this course. The purpose of these quizzes is to optimize performance by orienting students to (1) essential aspects of the course syllabus, and (2) general standards of scholarship and the use of APA style and format. These two quizzes may be taken an unlimited number of times, at any time during the period from Monday 12:01 AM CT of Week 1 through Sunday 11:59 PM CT of Week 4, using the Quizzes area for this course. [2 self-assessment quizzes x 10 points each = 20 total possible points] 

Quizzes: Students are required to complete a weekly quiz consisting of 20 multiple-choice questions covering the week’s assigned readings. Each week’s quiz may be taken once, at any time during the week but must be submitted no later than by Sunday 11:59 PM CT of the assigned week, using the Quizzes area for this course. Answers to chapter quizzes will be made available on the following Monday. [1 weekly quiz x 8 weeks x 10 points each = 80 possible points] 

Midterm Exam: Students are required to complete a midterm examination consisting of 50 multiple-choice questions, covering all course readings to date. The midterm examination is not proctored; you may use books and other resources. However, it is a two-hour timed test taken online, so you will not have much time to look up information. Moreover, the midterm examination may be attempted only one time and at one sitting; that is, once you start the midterm examination, you will have 120 consecutive minutes to submit your answers. This means that once you begin, you cannot stop, save and re-enter the exam at a later time. The midterm examination may be completed at any time during the period from Tuesday 12:01 AM CT through Sunday 11:59 PM CT of Week 4, using the Quizzes area for this course. [50 questions x 4 points each = 200 possible points] 

Final Exam: Students are required to complete a final examination consisting of 50 multiple-choice questions, covering all course readings since the midterm examination (that is, the final examination is not comprehensive). The final examination is a proctored exam. You will not be able to consult your notes, textbook, outside websites, flash drives, or other resources during the exam. Moreover, the final examination may be attempted only one time and at one sitting; that is, once you start the Final Examination, you will have 120 consecutive minutes to submit your answers. This means that once you begin, you cannot stop, save and re-enter the exam at a later time. The final examination is completed under supervision of an approved proctor, at any time during the period from Tuesday 12:01 AM CT through Saturday 11:59 PM CT of Week 8, using the Quizzes area for this course. [50 questions x 4 points each = 200 possible points]


Please Note: Work submitted for this class must not have been used previously by you or another individual. If you are retaking this course, you must submit all new and original work. Be sure to review the Plagiarism Tutorial located in the Content area of this course. (Note that the examples in this tutorial are based on MLA style. Psychology courses, such as this one, use APA publication style.)  



Course Outline

Click on each week to view details about the activities scheduled for that week.

Week 1: Introduction to Neuroscience
Readings

Kalat’s Biological Psychology

  • Introduction: Overview and Major Issues
  • Chapter 1: Nerve Cells and Nerve Impulses  
Discussion 1

Select one of this week’s Discussion assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Wednesday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Describe four biological explanations of behavior and give an example of each. Then, discuss the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, state which explanation you agree with the most. Be sure to defend your position with logical arguments and/or empirical evidence.
  • Discuss the ethical debate concerning the use of animals in research. Advance the position you agree with the most. Be sure to defend your position using ethical, moral, logical, philosophical and/or empirical evidence arguments.
  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of the blood-brain barrier. Then, discuss some of the current research on the blood-brain barrier and how new advances in our understanding may be helpful or harmful to society.
Lab 1

Select one of this week’s Lab assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Friday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Sophisticated genetic testing is on the verge of making it possible to manipulate the genes of a human fetus to determine traits such as height, weight, and body shape.  Discuss how this type of designer genetics is likely to impact human evolution. Consider whether you believe this will have a positive, negative or any impact on our evolution.
  • Discuss what you might say or do to try to convince a solipsist that you are conscious.
  • Suggest any human behaviors that have a heritability of 0. Then, suggest any that have an environmental influence of 0. Discuss what this tells us about the interaction between nature and nurture.  
Discussion Responses

Submit three discussion responses anytime up to Saturday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using this week’s Discussion 1 or Lab 1 topics. 

Personal Introduction

Use the “Personal Introduction” topic to introduce yourself. In addition to your name, you may wish to include information about your present profession, hobbies, interest in psychology and/or sociology, professional aspirations, and any other information that can help us get to know you. Submit your personal introduction anytime up to Sunday, 11:59 PM CT of this week using the designated discussion topic in the Discussion area.  

Quiz 1

Take your multiple-choice, open-book quiz anytime up to Sunday, 11:59 PM, CT of this week.

Self-Assessment Quiz - Course Syllabus

Take your multiple choice quiz anytime up to Sunday, 11:59 PM, CT of Week 4, using the designated quiz in the Quizzes area.  

Self-Assessment Quiz - Scholarship/APA Style

Take your multiple choice quiz anytime up to Sunday, 11:59 PM, CT of Week 4, using the designated quiz in the Quizzes area.  

Week 2: Synapses and Anatomy of the Nervous System
Readings

Kalat’s Biological Psychology

  • Chapter 2: Synapses
  • Chapter 3: Anatomy and Research Methods
Discussion 2

Select one of this week’s Discussion assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Wednesday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Describe the role of diet in the synthesis of neurotransmitters. Then, discuss what implications this may have in terms of nutritional recommendations for healthy growth and development.
  • Discuss the different ways of increasing dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens used by nicotine, opiates, and marijuana. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
  • Identify the main structures and functions of the diencephalon, the limbic system, the basal ganglia, and the basal forebrain. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
Lab 2

Select one of this week’s Lab assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Friday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Pretend a new chemical named Bliss (from a Dr. Who episode) has been found in the central nervous system. Moreover, protein receptors have also been located that interact with this chemical. Discuss whether this chemical would qualify as a neurotransmitter. Consider what additional evidence would be necessary before Bliss can be declared a neurotransmitter.
  • Neuron X has a synapse onto neuron Y, and Y has a synapse onto Z. Presume here that no other neurons or synapses are present. An experimenter finds that excitation of neuron X causes an action potential in neuron Z after a short delay. However, she determines that the synapse of X onto Y is inhibitory. Explain how the stimulation of X might produce excitation of Z.
  • When monkeys with Klüver-Bucy syndrome pick up lighted matches and snakes, we do not know whether they are displaying an emotional deficit or a difficulty identifying the object. Suggest an experiment that might help answer this question.
Discussion Responses

Submit three discussion responses anytime up to Saturday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using this week’s Discussion 2 or Lab 2 topics. 

Quiz 2

Take your multiple-choice, open-book quiz anytime up to Sunday, 11:59 PM, CT of this week.

Proctor Information
Submit your proctor form to the appropriate Dropbox folder by the end of the week. Remember to “Save” the form before placing it in Dropbox. See the Content area for more information.
Week 3: Brain Plasticity and Vision
Readings

Kalat’s Biological Psychology

  • Chapter 4: Genetics, Evolution, Development, and Plasticity
  • Chapter 5: Vision
Discussion 3

Select one of this week’s Discussion assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Wednesday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Explain why there is initial overproduction of neurons. Describe how axons follow chemical paths to their destinations and make functional connections. Then, discuss how this process allows them to survive. Finally, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
  • Discuss the trade-off between acuity for detail and sensitivity to dim light. Consider the pros and cons of one of these sensory perceptions, and discuss the implications on the way humans make sense of their visual environment.
  • Describe the brain areas that process color and motion. Then, discuss why humans may have developed these brain areas and how humans might experience life without the ability to process color. Consider the available literature to support your response.
Lab 3

Select one of this week’s Lab assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Friday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • The human brain is able to increase synaptic connections in response to early environmental stimulation. Discuss how this knowledge could be used to improve our educational system and improve academic performance. 
  • The majority of infant crib toys are produced in pastel shades such as light blue or pink. Based on research on the visual abilities of newborns, discuss the colors and designs for toys that would stimulate the infant visual system.
  • A rabbit has eyes on the sides of its head instead of in front. Discuss whether you would expect rabbits to have many cells with binocular receptive fields--that is, cells that respond to both eyes. Then, discuss whether you would expect the cortical cells of a rabbit to be just as sensitive to the effects of experience as are the cells of cats and primates. Explain your answers.
Discussion Responses

Submit three discussion responses anytime up to Saturday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using this week’s Discussion 3 or Lab 3 topics. 

Quiz 3

Take your multiple-choice, open-book quiz anytime up to Sunday, 11:59 PM, CT of this week.

Week 4: Other Sensory Systems and Movement
Readings

Kalat’s Biological Psychology

  • Chapter 6: Other Sensory Systems
  • Chapter 7: Movement  
Discussion 4

Select one of this week’s Discussion assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Wednesday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Describe some of the common types of hearing loss and the conditions that can cause them. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
  • Describe the roles of the various neurotransmitters in the production of pain. Then, discuss the alleviation of pain. Finally, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
  • Discuss some of the genetic and environmental causes of Parkinson’s disease. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
Lab 4

Select one of this week’s Lab assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Friday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Cochlear implants remain a controversial treatment for people suffering from nerve deafness. Many deaf advocates believe that the treatment is an affront to the deaf community. Discuss the research regarding how implants work to restore hearing. Consider why some in the deaf community oppose this treatment.
  • Science has debunked claims that subliminal messages can create an irresistible urge to engage in a particular behavior. However, there are numerous self-help tapes sold with the premise of changing behavior through subliminal perception. Investigate how these tapes are supposed to work. Discuss the research that would refute or support these claims.
  • Discuss whether you would expect jaguars, cheetahs, and other great cats to have mostly slow-twitch, non-fatiguing muscles in their legs or mostly fast-twitch, quickly fatiguing muscles. Explain your answer. Consider what kinds of animals might have mostly the opposite kind of muscles.
Discussion Responses

Submit three discussion responses anytime up to Saturday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using this week’s Discussion 4 or Lab 4 topics. 

Quiz 4

Take your multiple-choice, open-book quiz anytime up to Sunday, 11:59 PM, CT of this week.

Midterm Exam

The midterm examination consists of 50 multiple-choice questions, covering course material from Chapters 1 through 7. The midterm examination is a non-proctored exam. You may use your book and other resources for this exam. However, the 2-hour time for the computerized exam will limit your ability to look up answers. Note that once you start the midterm examination, you will have exactly 120 consecutive minutes to submit your answers. This means that once you begin, you cannot stop, save and re-enter the exam at a later time. The midterm examination may be taken any time during the period from Tuesday, 12:01 AM, CT, through Sunday, 11:59 PM, CT, of this week, using the designated exam in the Quizzes area. A student who does not submit the midterm examination by Sunday of Week 4 will earn zero points for this requirement.  

Week 5: Wakefulness, Sleep and Internal Regulation
Readings

Kalat’s Biological Psychology

  • Chapter 8: Wakefulness and Sleep
  • Chapter 9: Internal Regulation  
Discussion 5

Select one of this week’s Discussion assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Wednesday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Describe the brain areas and neurotransmitters that promote wakefulness, slow-wave sleep and REM sleep. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
  • Discuss the advantage of moderate fevers and the physiological mechanisms that produce fever. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
  • Describe the functions, neurotransmitters, and outputs of the hunger- and satiety-sensitive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
Lab 5

Select one of this week’s Lab assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Friday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • There is a large amount of research supporting the hypothesis that workers on the night shift have significantly more accidents and make more errors than workers on other time shifts. Discuss ways to improve the safety of workers on night shift. Also suggest schedules of work that would allow the night hours to be covered, but may be better suited for human circadian rhythms.
  • Consider that you travel across several time zones to the east and want to use melatonin to help reset your circadian rhythm. Suggest at what time of day you should you take the melatonin. Now consider that you are traveling west. Suggest the optimal time of day to take melatonin. Explain your answers.
  • Sport drinks have become very popular and many people drink them in lieu of water. Research the contents of these drinks and discuss whether these drinks are really of benefit to most people. Consider whether, beneficial or not, if the extra calories and high salt content make these drinks a health hazard.
Discussion Responses

Submit three discussion responses anytime up to Saturday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using this week’s Discussion 5 or Lab 5 topics. 

Quiz 5

Take your multiple-choice, open-book quiz anytime up to Sunday, 11:59 PM, CT of this week.

Week 6: Reproduction and Emotions
Readings

Kalat’s Biological Psychology

  • Chapter 10: Reproductive Behaviors
  • Chapter 11: Emotional Behaviors 
Discussion 6

Select one of this week’s Discussion assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Wednesday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Discuss the activating roles of hormones on reproductive behaviors and neurotransmitters in certain brain areas. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
  • Discuss the ways in which the amygdala promotes fear and anxiety. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
  • Describe the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Then, discuss the relation between size of hippocampus, cortisol levels, and vulnerability to PTSD. Finally, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
Lab 6

Select one of this week’s Lab assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Friday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Develop a list of behaviors that are predominately and/or stereotypically female and male. Then, consider if these behaviors are based on gender or sex differences. Finally, explain the criteria you used to differentiate between gender and sex.
  • In all human cultures, men prefer to mate with attractive young women and women prefer men who are wealthy and successful (as well as attractive, if possible). It was remarked in the text that the similarity across cultures is not sufficient evidence to demonstrate that these preferences depend on genetics. Suggest more convincing evidence for this observation.
  • The television and movie character from the Star Trek series, Mr. Spock, was most notable for his lack of emotion. His lack of emotion was demonstrated primarily by his lack of behavioral responses to stimuli and situations that induced emotional responses from the characters surrounding him. Based on the definition of emotion discussed in the text, discuss whether Mr. Spock truly lacked emotions. Consider other criteria that might be necessary to make this determination.
Scholarly Paper

Scholarly Paper: The Scholarly Paper is due this week. Remember that a scholarly paper should demonstrate a standard of critical thinking at levels of analysis, evaluation, and synthesis. Be sure to use and cite references that meet the standard for scholarship. Proof your paper for spelling, clarity and organization. Format your paper in accordance with current APA style (refer to www.apa.org for further assistance). Refer to the Scholarly Paper rubric in the course to understand the grading criteria. Submit your paper by Friday, 11:59 PM, CT, of this week using the Dropbox area. A paper that is submitted after the due date/time will receive a two-point per day deduction, through Wednesday of Week 8, after which no paper will be accepted for credit.  

Discussion Responses

Submit three discussion responses anytime up to Saturday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using this week’s Discussion 6 or Lab 6 topics. 

Quiz 6

Take your multiple-choice, open-book quiz anytime up to Sunday, 11:59 PM, CT of this week.

Course Evaluation
Please evaluate the course. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link sent to your CougarMail will allow you to access the evaluation. Please note that these evaluations are provided so that I can improve the course, find out what students perceive to be its strengths and weaknesses, and in general assess the success of the course. Please do take the time to fill this out.
Week 7: Learning, Memory and Cognition
Readings

Kalat’s Biological Psychology

  • Chapter 12: The Biology of Learning and Memory
  • Chapter 13: Cognitive Functions
Discussion 7

Select one of this week’s Discussion assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Wednesday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Describe the theories that explain the function of the hippocampus in declarative memory, spatial memory, configural learning, and consolidation. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
  • Describe the factors that affect recovery of speech after brain damage. Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
  • Describe the symptoms, possible brain correlates, and treatments of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Then, review the available relevant literature to discuss something of interest, something we are currently learning, and/or something new about this topic.
Lab 7

Select one of this week’s Lab assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Friday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Research in animals has demonstrated that early sensory stimulation increases the number of synaptic connections and improves performance on many cognitive tasks. Discuss possible mechanisms involved in this task improvement. Consider the possible relevance of this research to humans.
  • Boys are over represented in the population of children with reading disorders. Discuss whether differences in lateralization account for the greater amount of language disability. Be sure to consider whether boys have some advantages due to the greater lateralization.
  • ADHD is diagnosed far more commonly in the United States today than in the past, and far more in the United States than in Europe. Suggest several possible explanations. Consider how these hypotheses might be testable.
Discussion Responses

Submit three discussion responses anytime up to Saturday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using this week’s Discussion 7 or Lab 7 topics. 

Quiz 7

Take your multiple-choice, open-book quiz anytime up to Sunday, 11:59 PM, CT of this week.

Week 8: Psychological Disorders
Readings

Kalat’s Biological Psychology

  • Chapter 14: Psychological Disorders
Lab 8

Select one of this week’s Lab assignments to answer. Submit your assignment anytime up to Friday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using the corresponding Discussion topic. The following questions represent a sample of the range of question options for this week's assignment.

  • Research the addictive properties and the health consequences of using nicotine. Then, discuss whether nicotine should continue to be legal.
  • Bipolar depression is a particularly difficult disorder to recognize because most people do not realize they periodically exhibit mania. In fact, since increased confidence and elevated mood are symptoms of this phase, it is rare for a person to seek care when manic. Discuss how psychologists might screen potential sufferers of this disorder.
  • Consider why it can be difficult to find effective drugs for someone who suffers from both depression and schizophrenia.
Discussion Responses

Submit three discussion responses anytime up to Saturday, 11:59 PM CT of this week, using this week’s Lab 8 topics. 

Quiz 8

Take your multiple-choice, open-book quiz anytime up to Saturday, 11:59 PM, CT of this week.

Final Exam (Proctored)

The final examination consists of 50 multiple-choice questions, covering course material from Chapters 8 through 14. The final examination is a proctored closed book exam. See the proctor policy below. Note that once you start the final examination, you will have exactly 120 consecutive minutes to submit your answers. This means that once you begin, you cannot stop, save and re-enter the exam at a later time. The final examination is completed as scheduled with your proctor during the period from Tuesday, 12:01 AM, CT through Saturday, 11:59 PM, CT of this week, using the designated exam in the Quizzes area.  



Course Policies

Student Conduct

All Columbia College students, whether enrolled in a land-based or online course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Columbia College's Student Conduct Code and Acceptable Use Policy. Students violating these policies will be referred to the office of Student Affairs and/or the office of Academic Affairs for possible disciplinary action. The Student Code of Conduct and the Computer Use Policy for students can be found in the Columbia College Student Handbook. The Handbook is available online; you can also obtain a copy by calling the Student Affairs office (Campus Life) at 573-875-7400. The teacher maintains the right to manage a positive learning environment, and all students must adhere to the conventions of online etiquette.

Plagiarism

Your grade will be based in large part on the originality of your ideas and your written presentation of these ideas. Presenting the words, ideas, or expression of another in any form as your own is plagiarism. Students who fail to properly give credit for information contained in their written work (papers, journals, exams, etc.) are violating the intellectual property rights of the original author. For proper citation of the original authors, you should reference the appropriate publication manual for your degree program or course (APA, MLA, etc.). Violations are taken seriously in higher education and may result in a failing grade on the assignment, a grade of "F" for the course, or dismissal from the College.

Collaboration conducted between students without prior permission from the instructor is considered plagiarism and will be treated as such. Spouses and roommates taking the same course should be particularly careful.

All required papers may be submitted for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers may be included in the Turnitin.com reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. This service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Non-Discrimination

There will be no discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, ideology, political affiliation, veteran status, age, physical handicap, or marital status.

Student Accessibility Resources

Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the office of Student Accessibility Resources. Until the student has been cleared through this office, accommodations do not have to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus as soon as possible. The structure or the content of the course may make an accommodation not feasible. Student Accessibility Resources is located in Student Affairs in AHSC 215 and can be reached by phone at (573) 875-7626 or email at sar@ccis.edu.

Online Participation

You are expected to read the assigned texts and participate in the discussions and other course activities each week. Assignments should be posted by the due dates stated on the grading schedule in your syllabus. If an emergency arises that prevents you from participating in class, please let your instructor know as soon as possible.

Attendance Policy

Attendance for a week will be counted as having submitted any assigned activity for which points are earned. Attendance for the week is based upon the date work is submitted. A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday (except for week 8, when the work and the course will end on Saturday at midnight.) The course and system deadlines are based on the Central Time Zone.

Cougar Email

All students are provided a CougarMail account when they enroll in classes at Columbia College. You are responsible for monitoring email from that account for important messages from the College and from your instructor. You may forward your Cougar email account to another account; however, the College cannot be held responsible for breaches in security or service interruptions with other email providers.

Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. The class discussions are for public messages so the class members can each see what others have to say about any given topic and respond.

Late Assignment Policy

An online class requires regular participation and a commitment to your instructor and your classmates to regularly engage in the reading, discussion and writing assignments. Although most of the online communication for this course is asynchronous, you must be able to commit to the schedule of work for the class for the next eight weeks. You must keep up with the schedule of reading and writing to successfully complete the class.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Any Discussion Assignment, Lab Assignment, Discussion Response, Quiz, or Exam that is submitted after its due date/time will earn zero (0) points. A paper that is submitted after its due date/time will receive a deduction of two points per day past due, up to Week 8 Wednesday 11:59 PM CT after which it will earn zero (0) points. Emergencies (unforeseen events that occur outside the control of the student) will be evaluated for authorized short-term extensions (usually a few days) by the instructor on a case-by-case basis. Documentation of the emergency may be required.  

Course Evaluation

You will have an opportunity to evaluate the course near the end of the session. A link will be sent to your CougarMail that will allow you to access the evaluation. Be assured that the evaluations are anonymous and that your instructor will not be able to see them until after final grades are submitted.

Proctor Policy

Students taking courses that require proctored exams must submit their completed proctor request forms to their instructors by the end of the second week of the session. Proctors located at Columbia College campuses are automatically approved. The use of ProctorU services is also automatically approved. The instructor of each course will consider any other choice of proctor for approval or denial. Additional proctor choices the instructor will consider include: public librarians, high school or college instructors, high school or college counseling services, commanding officers, education service officers, and other proctoring services. Personal friends, family members, athletic coaches and direct supervisors are not acceptable.


Additional Resources

Orientation for New Students

This course is offered online, using course management software provided by Desire2Learn and Columbia College. The course user guide provides details about taking an online course at Columbia College. You may also want to visit the course demonstration to view a sample course before this one opens.

Technical Support

If you have problems accessing the course or posting your assignments, contact your instructor, the Columbia College Helpdesk, or the D2L Helpdesk for assistance. Contact information is also available within the online course environment.

Online Tutoring

Smarthinking is a free online tutoring service available to all Columbia College students. Smarthinking provides real-time online tutoring and homework help for Math, English, and Writing. Smarthinking also provides access to live tutorials in writing and math, as well as a full range of study resources, including writing manuals, sample problems, and study skills manuals. You can access the service from wherever you have a connection to the Internet. I encourage you to take advantage of this free service provided by the college.

Access Smarthinking through CougarTrack under Students -> Academics -> Academic Resources.


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