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About the Campaign

The Tradition Meets Tomorrow campaign seeks the investment of gifts and grants from individuals, businesses and foundations to renew and strengthen education for students today and for generations of students to come. This investment will fuel Columbia College to provide the advanced teaching tools, technology, facilities, faculty and more required for student success.

The campaign identifies five areas of support:

  • The Sciences (Science; Criminal Justice, including Forensic Science and Human Services; Psychology; Nursing; and Computer and Mathematical Sciences)
  • The Arts and Humanities (Art; Humanities, including English, Music, Speech Communication and English as a Second Language; History and Political Science; and Education)
  • Business (including the Center for Entrepreneurship)
  • Adult Higher Education (AHE – includes all Online, Evening and Nationwide campuses)
  • Athletics (men's and women's basketball, softball, volleyball, men's soccer, plus five new sports: women's soccer, men's and women's golf, and men's and women's cross-country)

Philanthropists may choose to direct their gifts among many opportunities for support, including the following:

  • Facilities on the main campus: Science Building, Center for Entrepreneurship (Business), Practice Hall (Music), Larson Gallery (Art), Koepke Fitness Center (Athletics) and others.
  • AHE facilities that are currently undergoing new property acquisition or renovation: Columbia College-Rolla (Morris Hall), Columbia College-Syracuse, Columbia College-Springfield, Columbia College-Denver and Columbia College-St. Louis.

In addition, Columbia College welcomes philanthropic gifts that support and initiate student scholarships, faculty chairs, professorships, faculty enhancement, equipment and more.

How can your gifts impact the campaign?

Sciences: Supporting the sciences inspires students to set big goals

Student Government Association President Avery Bourne, Cougar athlete Julie Teeple, and Mackenzie Booth in downtown Columbia, Mo. Booth received the James and Betty Allen Braham ’42 Science Scholarship in 2012
Student Government Association President Avery Bourne, Cougar athlete Julie Teeple, and Mackenzie Booth in downtown Columbia, Mo. Booth received the James and Betty Allen Braham ’42 Science Scholarship in 2012

Columbia College's state-of-the-art science building will be dedicated fall 2013. The building will facilitate learning for students majoring in biology, chemistry, environmental science or forensic science.

The laboratories will boast the latest in science teaching tools and safety features. These large open spaces will allow plenty of work area and storage space for experiments. The labs will offer digital access for tracking experiments, offer 100 percent air turnaround circulation for safety and plentiful windows to make lab that much more enjoyable.

The building also features a 126-seat auditorium built to suit a variety of group needs, while a lower–level atrium functions as a more intimate space with furniture to accommodate faculty and students studying, gathering or just hanging out.

"My professors could not be better if I was studying at Yale," says junior Mackenzie Booth '14, a science scholarship recipient who is studying chemistry and plans to be a pediatrician after med school. "I'm a pre-med student and my research showed that chemistry is a huge part of the MCAT. I'm lucky enough to put myself ahead for that test while studying something that I enjoy." Make an impact on the sciences Give Today

Business: A gift to the business department boots entrepreneurial spirit

The inaugural Fishman Entrepreneurs, Brynne and Bailye Stansberry ’12, were named at the May 4, 2012, Columbia College Board of Trustees meeting.
The inaugural Fishman Entrepreneurs, Brynne and Bailye Stansberry ’12, were named at the May 4, 2012, Columbia College Board of Trustees meeting.

The inaugural Fishman Entrepreneurs, Brynne and Bailye Stansberry '12, were named at the May 4, 2012, Columbia College Board of Trustees meeting. The $5,000 Big Lots CEO Steve Fishman '73 gifted to each twin helped their longtime business plan become reality.

While in high school, the Stansberrys developed a product: clear rain boots with fashionable, interchangeable liners. While attending Columbia College in 2009, the girls were introduced to Dr. Sean Siebert, assistant professor of business administration. "I was impressed that they already had a patent pending on their idea, and I wanted to help them take it to the next level," Siebert says.

Siebert and the twins attended the 2011 Mid-Mo Entrepreneurial Summit's Idea Bounce Competition where the twins and other competitors had the chance to present product ideas to potential investors. The twins won first prize and $1,000.

Currently, the twins are in the process of raising capital to enable production of the rain boots and are actively looking for investors. Along the way, they've received consultation and support from Columbia College business administration faculty and alumni. Make an impact on business Give Today

Online Education: Support online students through an e-Scholarship

Chris Crowther, an e-Scholarship recipient, with wife, Amy and their two sons, Broderick in front and two year old Devan on Chris’ shoulders.
Chris Crowther, an e-Scholarship recipient, with wife, Amy and their two sons, Broderick in front and two year old Devan on Chris’ shoulders.

When Christopher Crowther committed to going back to school in 2005, he vowed to give it his all. "I made the decision that I would not accept subpar performance and would devote myself to my education," he says. "My priorities are still split between my career as a military officer, my wife and two sons, and my education, but I have been able to maintain this balance while still devoting myself to my college studies."

Crowther's attitude and work ethic made him an ideal candidate for a $1,000 e-Scholarship to help fund his education. The scholarship, which can be applied to tuition, books and fees, is designed to reward outstanding achievement in online study at Columbia College. Consideration is given to those applicants who, in addition to meeting the minimum criteria, demonstrate a history of academic excellence and personal growth as a result of taking courses online.

"Being able to effectively communicate and write has been the cornerstone to the success of my online education through Columbia College," Crowther says, giving credit to an English composition class he took online. "Although I have the least formal education on my campus, I am able to seamlessly communicate and blend in with my colleagues, some of whom have multiple advanced degrees. The ability to correspond professionally has paid off in dividends, earning respect and credibility among my peers." Make an impact on distance education Give Today

Adult Higher Education: Help fund a scholarship to further Adult Higher Education

Frank Westling, center at the main campus in Columbia, Mo. during the 1980s.
Frank Westling, center at the main campus in Columbia, Mo. during the 1980s.

Each year Columbia College awards a $500 scholarship to as many as 35 students in honor of Frank S. Westling. Westling was a highly decorated infantry officer and former dean of the college's Extended Studies Division, now Adult Higher Education. The scholarship, which can be applied to tuition and book fees, is non-renewable and awarded to new students each year.

"Columbia College is proud to offer this scholarship to students at our extended campuses," said Mike Randerson, vice president for Adult Higher Education. "Frank Westling was instrumental in establishing the Extended Studies Division to serve working adults and military personnel, and he would be pleased to know the scholarship is helping fulfill the educational goals of students around the country."

Before joining the college, Westling served in the U.S. Army for 31 years, fighting in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. He was awarded the Purple Heart, Bronze Star and Silver Star medals and earned parachutist and glider badges. During the Vietnam War, he commanded the Army's 4th Psychological Operations Group in Saigon and retired as a colonel. Make an impact on adult education Give Today